T. Kurimay, Hungary

North-Central Buda Center, New Saint John Hospital and Outpatient Clinic Buda Family Centred Mental Health Centre, Psychiatry and Psychiatric Rehabilitation, Teaching Department of Semmelweis University
He graduated at Semmelweis University Budapest. He has got postgraduate specialty in psychiatry, psychotherapy, addictionology, and rehabilitation also in supervision. He works in one of the largest regional hospital in Budapest, North-Central Buda Center, New Saint John Hospital and Outpatient Clinic, as the head of Buda Family Centred Mental Health Centre, Teaching Department of Semmelweis University. He initiated a family-oriented psychiatric approach, as well as the first Hungarian Baby-Mother – Father Unit into the hospital setting. He is dedicated to develop this programme further, to enhance the availability of perinatal services in Hungary and in the region. He is affiliated, and teacher at Eötvös Lóránd University and Semmelweis University. He is a past-president of the Hungarian Psychiatric Association, currently chair of HPA Committee of Foreign Affairs. Board member of the European Psychiatric Association (EPA), co-chair of the EPA WGMH Section. He is the counter part on Mental Health of Hungary for WHO. In research, his main interests are how to utilize and influence the bio-psycho-social systems, sports-related topics, and perinatal psychiatry, networks including families. He published over 80 articles in scientific journals, author and co-author of 25 books and chapters, presented more than 300 lectures in national and international conferences.

Moderator Of 1 Session

Clinical/Therapeutic
Date
Sun, 11.04.2021
Session Time
15:30 - 17:00
Room
Channel 1
Session Description
There is a growing number of evidence that beside the importance of the baby-mother relationship there are several other psycho-social factors which have importance in the healthy development of the infant, as well as on the mother suffering perinatal mental disorder. Although, the extended family and important others are concerned during perinatal period, the focus of the non-pharmacological interventions mainly on the mother. The symposium highlights the effectiveness and importance of family-based interventions in clinical practice, evidences in different methods, like video-feedback, integrated and graduated perinatal care, psychoeducation for perinatal depression and the contextual, relational ethics among family members usually guiding these interventions.
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Live

Presenter Of 7 Presentations

How to Organize MH Service to Support New Mothers (ID 1132) No Topic Needed

How to Organize MH Service to Support New Mothers

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Live, Ask the Expert
Date
Sun, 11.04.2021
Session Time
17:30 - 18:30
Room
Ask the Expert A
Lecture Time
17:30 - 18:30
Sunday, 11 April: Midday Roundup (ID 1164) No Topic Needed

Midday Roundup

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Live TV
Date
Sun, 11.04.2021
Session Time
13:00 - 13:30
Room
EPA TV
Lecture Time
13:00 - 13:30
Tuesday, 13 April: Highlights of the Day (ID 1172) No Topic Needed

Highlights of the Day

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Live TV
Date
Tue, 13.04.2021
Session Time
17:00 - 17:30
Room
EPA TV
Lecture Time
17:00 - 17:30
LIVE - ECP Symposium: Perinatal Psychiatry: Is it All About the Mother? (ID 839) No Topic Needed

Live Q&A

LIVE - Symposium: Evidence-Based Family Interventions in Perinatal Psychiatry (ID 634) No Topic Needed

Live Q&A

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Live
Date
Sun, 11.04.2021
Session Time
15:30 - 17:00
Room
Channel 1
Lecture Time
16:38 - 16:58
LIVE - ECP Symposium: Perinatal Psychiatry: Is it All About the Mother? (ID 839) No Topic Needed

ECP0003 - The Role of Perinatal Care in Early Life Trauma Prevention

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Live, ECP Session
Date
Sun, 11.04.2021
Session Time
10:00 - 11:30
Room
Channel 2
Lecture Time
10:34 - 10:51

ABSTRACT

Abstract Body

Mental health support for parents, infants and children as an interdisciplinary, cross-sectoral task has existed for decades in many European countries. A highlighted goal of integrated services (medical, social and educational) is to support competent parenting and the positive parent-child relationship, for the optimal development including mental health of infants and children.

In clinical practice, the role of psychiatrists is often linked to healing and rehabilitation, even though we also have an important role in prevention.

The mental support, treatment and prevention of psychiatric disorders during the pre-, peri- and postnatal period are often not considered being preventive measures.

The perinatal period is the most sensitive and at the same time one of the most important stages of our lives. The traumas suffered during this period affect both the mother and the newborn, in fact it affects the family as a whole.

Models for the prevention of early trauma appear at the level of social community and, inter alia, health and social care.

Traumas are closely linked to social determinants of health.

Gene environment interactions also allow for the transgenerational transmission of trauma.

The presentation introduces individual and family levels of interdisciplinary care, good practices and programs the knowledge of which may be important to psychiatrists. How the practicing psychiatrist can contribute to trauma prevention and how to understand the development of resilience.

The presenter will detail good practices, and highlight the possibilities for all clinicians on ways to work in their respective field with a trauma preventive approach.

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LIVE - Symposium: Evidence-Based Family Interventions in Perinatal Psychiatry (ID 634) No Topic Needed

S0052 - Family Healing: Contextual Interventions in Perinatal Clinical Practice

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Live
Date
Sun, 11.04.2021
Session Time
15:30 - 17:00
Room
Channel 1
Lecture Time
16:21 - 16:38

ABSTRACT

Abstract Body

In perinatal clinical practice (PCP), the focus of care has shifted from the mother and then the baby-mother dyad to the emphasis on the role of fathers. Individual and therapeutic interventions are multimodal, and in almost all cases interdisciplinary cooperation is assumed. The preferred therapeutic methods for perinatal mental disorders are psychological and psychotherapeutic interventions. Through the life-course model, the central, therapeutic-conceptual role of the family can be understood, which - in clinical practice - reflects the need for “think-family” in psychiatric care.

Hence there is a growing need for evidence-based family-interventions.

Parental mental health disorders may have an impact on family functioning and partner relationship, as well as parent-child interactions, the quality of attachment and relationship with the child.

Even though we have an increasing number of evidence regarding the aims and effectiveness of family interventions, additional evidence is needed to determine what interventions and modalities are effective in the perinatal period. And we also need information when these interventions are contraindicated and regarding their risk.

It is conceivable that there is not much difference between the efficacy of family intervention methods used in other indications and the perinatal application of the same methods.

We have gathered evidence primarily on perinatal depression, which opens the path of family interventions in other disorders.

When thinking in the family as a general framework, it should be filled with evidence-based quantitative and qualitative anchors.

The conceptual framework can be based on systems- and network theory.

The presentation is illustrated with clinical vignettes.

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