J. Barlow, United Kingdom

University of Oxford Department of Social Policy and Intervention
Jane is Professor of Evidence Based Intervention and Policy Evaluation at the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, University of Oxford. Her main research interest is the role of early parenting in the aetiology of mental health problems, and the evaluation of interventions aimed at improving parenting practices during pregnancy and the postnatal period. She also undertakes research to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions aimed at preventing child abuse. She is currently President of AIMH UK, Affiliate Council Representative of the Executive Board of WAIMH, an Associate Editor for the Infant Mental Health Journal, and was a member of PreVAiL (Preventing Violence Across the Lifespan).

Presenter Of 3 Presentations

Good Parenting: How to Prevent MH Disorders Early (ID 1133) No Topic Needed

Good Parenting: How to Prevent MH Disorders Early

Session Icon
Live, Ask the Expert
Date
Sun, 11.04.2021
Session Time
17:30 - 18:30
Room
Ask the Expert B
Lecture Time
17:30 - 18:30
LIVE - Symposium: Evidence-Based Family Interventions in Perinatal Psychiatry (ID 634) No Topic Needed

Live Q&A

Session Icon
Live
Date
Sun, 11.04.2021
Session Time
15:30 - 17:00
Room
Channel 1
Lecture Time
16:38 - 16:58
LIVE - Symposium: Evidence-Based Family Interventions in Perinatal Psychiatry (ID 634) No Topic Needed

S0051 - What Is the Role of Video Feedback in Supporting Parents Experiencing Mental Health Problems?

Session Icon
Live
Date
Sun, 11.04.2021
Session Time
15:30 - 17:00
Room
Channel 1
Lecture Time
16:04 - 16:21

ABSTRACT

Abstract Body

Parental mental health problems have been found to have a significant impact on a range of aspects of parental caregiving during the postnatal period, with significant implications in terms of key aspects of the child’s development. Video feedback is a generic term that refers to the use of videotaped interactions of the parent and child to promote parental sensitivity, and a recent meta‐analysis of 20 studies (1757 parent‐child dyads) found that video feedback can improve parental sensitivity compared with a control or no intervention up to six months' follow‐up. This paper will examine the ways in which video feedback might contribute to the ability of parents with mental health problems to provide the type of caregiving that will promote the development of a secure attachment in the infant.

Hide