A. Fiorillo, Italy

University of Campania Department of Psychiatry

Moderator Of 10 Sessions

Educational
Date
Mon, 12.04.2021
Session Time
19:30 - 21:00
Room
Channel 5
Session Description
The Live Q&A of this session will take place in the Live Sessions auditorium. Please refer to the interactive programme for the exact time and channel.

Bipolar disorder is a severe mental disorder associated with high levels of personal and societal burden. Although several pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions have been developed and are currently available in the routine the long-term treatment of bipolar patients, the rate of functional recovery is not very satisfying yet. Many unmet needs are still present in the optimal management of bipolar patients, including diagnostic, clinical and therapeutic challenges.  New perspectives are emerging for improving the clinical and functional outcomes of patients suffering from bipolar disorder. In particular, it has been recently argued that the optimal management of bipolar patients requires the evaluation of patient’s personal history according to a longitudinal perspective. In this conceptual framework, the construct of predominant polarity has been proposed by Colom for describing the predominant type of affective episodes according to a lifetime perspective. The predominant polarity has several therapeutic and prognostic implications for the long-term management of bipolar patients. Furthermore, neuroimaging correlates have recently confirmed the prognostic role of predominant polarity, highlighting the relevance of such index from a clinical perspective. In this symposium, the role of neuroimaging correlates of predominant polarity will be presented. Moreover, further new perspectives in the field of research in bipolar disorder are recently focusing on the role of childhood maltreatment and expression of symptoms during childhood as relevant predictors of long-term outcome. There is the need to translate the model of early interventions to the context of affective disorders, in order to significantly improve the long-term outcome of bipolar patients.

Session Icon
Pre-Recorded with Live Q&A
Educational
Date
Mon, 12.04.2021
Session Time
08:00 - 09:30
Room
Channel 5
Session Description
The Live Q&A of this session will take place in the Live Sessions auditorium. Please refer to the interactive programme for the exact time and channel.

The symposium will present four scenarios for the future of psychiatry – seen by psychiatrists with predominantly national experience at the beginning, middle and  top of their career and by a psychiatrist with nearly fifty years of work on international mental health and psychiatry issues. The perspectives will differ and it is expected that taken jointly they will present a more realistic estimate of psychiatry in the future than those usually forecast. The presentations will address issues of diagnosis and treatment of mental disorders as well as those of training for psychiatry and its role in public health efforts. The presentations will also touch upon matters such as the impact of new digital technology and trends of telemedicine,  advances in the management of comorbidity of mental and physical disorders, and the role of psychiatry in future global crises such as those caused by pandemics and pollution and climate change.

Session Icon
Pre-Recorded with Live Q&A
Educational
Date
Mon, 12.04.2021
Session Time
17:30 - 19:00
Room
Channel 5
Session Description
The Live Q&A of this session will take place in the Live Sessions auditorium. Please refer to the interactive programme for the exact time and channel.

The current diagnostic systems are subjected to continuing revision processes in order to adequately describe the complexity of mental disorders. During this process, some disorders have been progressively “forgotten” and are understudied by the younger generation of psychiatrists. Among the several reasons behind this process, there is the tendency of modern classification systems to improve the clinical utility of diagnostic categories, although reducing their validity. Furthermore, the reductionistic approach adopted by the modern classification systems has eliminated the capacity of detecting the subtle clinical differences among different patients, even when affected by the same disorder. However, the need for young generation of psychiatrists to re-discover the roots of psychopathology and the classical European tradition has been recently claimed. In this workshop, the speakers will discuss certain classical syndromes which are rarely addressed in the current educational curricula. In particular, de Clerambault, Cotard and Capgras syndromes will be presented, together with kleptomania and pyromania. The relevance of these syndromes for the clinical routine practice as well as the forensic implications will be extensively discussed.

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Pre-Recorded with Live Q&A
Educational
Date
Mon, 12.04.2021
Session Time
10:00 - 11:30
Room
Channel 1
Session Icon
Live
Educational
Date
Tue, 13.04.2021
Session Time
10:00 - 11:30
Room
Channel 1
Session Description
Major depression is a serious, disabling, often chronic or recurrent mental disorder affecting over 350 million people worldwide. Treatment of major depression is now conceptualized as proceeding through three phases: the acute phase, the continuation phase, and the remission phase. Patients not achieving remission after several treatment trials are defined treatment-resistant, but a debate is ongoing regarding how many trials must fail before a patient can be defined as “treatment-resistant”. A new concept of “difficult to treat depression” has been recently proposed, based on the model of other medical disciplines. According to this concept, when a complete control of the disorder is not feasible, the treatment should aim at minimizing the impact of symptoms and the side effects of treatments on patients’ daily lives. Moreover, the concept of difficult to treat depression includes the presence of co-occurring problems/behaviours/disorders/situations, which can worsen the course or management of depression. The management of difficult to treat depression include the optimization of disease management, in terms of symptom control, improvement of daily functioning and of quality of life, rather than aiming to achieve sustained remission. In this symposium, the model of difficult to treat depression will be described and the possible therapeutic implications for clinical practice will be discussed. The dimensional treatment model of depression will be introduced and atypical presentations of major depression will be highlighted in order to increase clinicians’ opportunities to manage major depression.
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Live
Date
Mon, 12.04.2021
Session Time
08:00 - 09:30
Room
Channel 6
Session Description
The Live Q&A of this session will take place in the Live Sessions auditorium. Please refer to the interactive programme for the exact time and channel.

Persons with severe mental disorders frequently experience discrimination and isolation due to the high levels of stigmatizing behaviours and attitudes held by the general population. Furthermore, stigma represents a significant obstacle not only for people suffering from mental disorders, but also for their relatives and their loved ones, who also experience stigma by association. Fighting stigma represents an “old unmet need” in the mental health field and several international and national organizations have promoted interventions for challenging stigma and improving mental health literacy in the general population. It has been clearly demonstrated that the specific cultural background can impact on the development of stigmatized belief, behaviours and attitudes about people with mental disorders. Therefore, in order to overcome stigma effectively it is needed a multicultural social perspective, even for adapting antistigma initiatives to the specific cultural context of each country or region. Although so many efforts have been put forward in fighting stigma and ending discrimination against disadvantaged people, stigma has not been overcome yet. There is the need to develop new effective, multimodal, integrated strategies in order to challenging effectively stigma. In this symposium, national experiences from different European countries will be discussed, with a specific focus on the future perspectives of research in the field of stigma and discrimination.

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Pre-Recorded with Live Q&A
Mental Health Policy
Date
Sun, 11.04.2021
Session Time
10:00 - 11:30
Room
Channel 6
Session Description
The Live Q&A of this session will take place in the Live Sessions auditorium. Please refer to the interactive programme for the exact time and channel.

The COVID-19 pandemic represents a unique traumatic event which has had and is continuing to have an impact on the mental health of the general population worldwide. The pandemic is a new form of threat, different from previous mass disasters such as tsunami or earthquakes, where the threat is well defined and confined in time and space, while this virus can be everywhere and can be carried by everyone. Therefore, the pandemic and its related containment measures are associated with high levels of depressive, anxiety and stress symptoms in the general population, as well as by increasing levels of stigma and discrimination towards the infected people. However, the pandemic is expected to cause a global economic recession, with increasing rates of unemployment and poverty, which will in turn increase social disparities and suicide risk. Therefore, the most disadvantaged people, such as people living with disabilities, elderly people or migrants, are expected to be the most severely affected by the long-term consequences of the pandemic. In this workshop, international renowned speakers will discuss the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic from a social, economic and clinical perspectives, also including experiences from low-resource settings. Furthermore, a specific focus will be given on carers of patients with severe mental disorders, which have been overlooked during the initial phases of the pandemic.

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Pre-Recorded with Live Q&A
EPA Course
Date
Tue, 13.04.2021
Session Time
15:00 - 17:00
Room
Courses Hall A
Session Description
Scientific research is essential in improving care of patients with mental health problems. European Psychiatry is the official journal of the European Psychiatric Association and is published since 1986 with the aim to improve the lives of patients with psychiatric disorders and to promote professional excellence through education and research. The course will provide essential information on how to write and successfully publish a paper in European Psychiatry. The teachers of the course are the two editors of the journal who will actively interact with participants in order to improve their writing skills. In particular, during the course, participants will be invited to discuss their experience with scientific journals and will be provided with practical suggestions on how to write good papers. Participants will be guided through the journey of publication from the hypothesis-based approach to Editor’s expectations until acceptance of manuscripts.
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Live, Ticket Required
Educational
Date
Sun, 11.04.2021
Session Time
08:00 - 09:30
Room
Channel 5
Session Description
The Live Q&A of this session will take place in the Live Sessions auditorium. Please refer to the interactive programme for the exact time and channel.

The rapid urbanization characterizing the modern era determined a relevant impact on global health, acting through different pathways. Anthropogenic actions contributed to exacerbate climate change in urban areas, causing several phenomena influencing urban citizens’ wellbeing. Implications on mental health were established in most recent times, representing a growing field of research. Indeed, the exposure to urban environment has been associated to a higher risk of developing serious mental disorders. The effects of frequently uncontrolled urbanism on mental health are expected to be correlated with several factors, such as higher level of pollutants, light changes, inflammatory mechanisms, unhealthy lifestyle, psychosocial determinants. In this complex scenery, environmental resilience is crucial in order to minimize vulnerabilities and possible risks connected to critical changes. Further interest on urbanization and climate change was also raised by the recent Covid-19 pandemic, since it was demonstrated that pollution may lead to significantly higher rates of death in people infected by the virus spread. In consideration of the implications that the Covid-19 pandemic presented on mental health, the role of environmental resilience as a possible protective factor will be critically analyzed. In addition, a critical reappraisal of the specific effects of climate change and related factors on mental health will be provided. The contribution of recent approaches such as the Ecological Momentary Assesment and the use of Big Data in the analysis of the environmental determinants of mental health will be also overviewed, considering possible future developments of research in this field specifically involving climate change.

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Pre-Recorded with Live Q&A
Date
Tue, 13.04.2021
Session Time
17:30 - 19:00
Room
Channel 4
Session Description
The Live Q&A of this session will take place in the Live Sessions auditorium. Please refer to the interactive programme for the exact time and channel.

Proposed by the EPA section on Neuroimaging -Brain subregional shrinkage is commonly reported in major affective and non -affective psychosis, but its role in the illness is still poorly understood. In particular, it is unclear how clinical and psychosocial variables relate to brain volumes across the life span.  In particular, longitudinal studies have reported a correlation between larger ventricles, decreased prefrontal volumes and worse outcome in psychoses. This would potentially allow to isolate subtypes of schizophrenia patients with a worse prognosis and more evident biological impairments, ultimately helping in designing specific cognitive rehabilitation. This symposium will focus on the correlations between environmental variables and psychotic and affective disorders. Four international recognised speakers in the field will represent countries from Europe, UK and USA. Prof. Kirkbride will describe whether environmental factors (e.g. urbanicity, migrancy, residential stability) may relate to increased risk of affective and non-affective psychosis. Prof. Fiorillo will delineate the impact of adversities during adolescence on the development of psychosocial disability and mental disorders, and how these can influence their long-term trajectory.  Prof. Brambilla will show the impact of disability and social functioning on brain anatomy in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Prof. Frangou will present data from a nationally representative  cohort of 10,000 children aged 9-10 years in the US, quantifying the effect of being raised in a psychosocially disadvantage environment and delineating the separate and cumulative effect of risk and protective factors. It has finally to be noted that this is an official proposal from the  EPA Neuroimaging Section.

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Pre-Recorded with Live Q&A, Section

Presenter Of 19 Presentations

Workshop: The “Forgotten” Psychiatric Syndromes (ID 293) No Topic Needed

Live Q&A

LIVE - Debate: Legalisation of Cannabis: Is it Harmful or is it a Needed Change? (ID 581) No Topic Needed

Live Q&A

Session Icon
Live
Date
Mon, 12.04.2021
Session Time
10:00 - 11:30
Room
Channel 1
Lecture Time
11:10 - 11:30
LIVE - Symposium: Difficult to Treat Depression (ID 270) No Topic Needed

Live Q&A

Session Icon
Live
Date
Tue, 13.04.2021
Session Time
10:00 - 11:30
Room
Channel 1
Lecture Time
11:08 - 11:28
Symposium: Challenging Stigma Attached to Mental Disorders in Different European Countries: Understanding and Doing Something (ID 295) No Topic Needed
LIVE - ECP Debate: Mental Health Care has Radically Changed with the Pandemic (ID 837) No Topic Needed

Live Q&A

Session Icon
Live, ECP Session, Sessions with Voting
Date
Tue, 13.04.2021
Session Time
08:00 - 09:30
Room
Channel 2
Lecture Time
09:00 - 09:20
Workshop: Practical Suggestions on the Clinical, Ethical and Economic Consequences of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Mental Health (ID 271) No Topic Needed
Symposium: Psychosocial Imaging: Disentangling the Interplay Between Environmental Variables and Psychotic Disorders (ID 297) No Topic Needed
Course 18: How to Write a Scientific Paper (ID 296) No Topic Needed

How to Write a Scientific Paper

Session Icon
Live, Ticket Required
Date
Tue, 13.04.2021
Session Time
15:00 - 17:00
Room
Courses Hall A
Lecture Time
15:00 - 17:00
Symposium: Health and Environmental Resilience: Effects of Urbanisation, Climate Change and Environmental Determinants on Mental Health (ID 281) No Topic Needed
Symposium: The Four Views of the Future of Psychiatry (ID 335) No Topic Needed

Live Q&A

Session Icon
Pre-Recorded with Live Q&A
Date
Mon, 12.04.2021
Session Time
08:00 - 09:30
Room
Channel 5
Lecture Time
09:08 - 09:28
Sunday, 11 April: Midday Roundup (ID 1164) No Topic Needed

Midday Roundup

Session Icon
Live TV
Date
Sun, 11.04.2021
Session Time
13:00 - 13:30
Room
EPA TV
Lecture Time
13:00 - 13:30
Symposium: New Perspectives on Bipolar Disorder (ID 291) No Topic Needed

Live Q&A

Session Icon
Pre-Recorded with Live Q&A
Date
Mon, 12.04.2021
Session Time
19:30 - 21:00
Room
Channel 5
Lecture Time
20:38 - 20:58
LIVE - Symposium: Evidence-Based Family Interventions in Perinatal Psychiatry (ID 634) No Topic Needed

Live Q&A

Session Icon
Live
Date
Sun, 11.04.2021
Session Time
15:30 - 17:00
Room
Channel 1
Lecture Time
16:38 - 16:58
LIVE - ECP Debate: Mental Health Care has Radically Changed with the Pandemic (ID 837) No Topic Needed

ECP0022 - Pro Perspective

Session Icon
Live, ECP Session, Sessions with Voting
Date
Tue, 13.04.2021
Session Time
08:00 - 09:30
Room
Channel 2
Lecture Time
08:00 - 08:30
Presenter

ABSTRACT

Abstract Body

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a detrimental impact not only on the ordinary lives of people worldwide, but also on the access to mental health care system. In particular, in the first months of the global health emergency, a drastic reduction in the number of access to healthcare system has been recorded. In the “Phase 1” of the emergency, the fear for the contagion, the strict containment measures and the lack of adequate information regarding the virus have been listed as possible factors contributing to this phenomenon. In the “Phase 2”, mental health care has been completely reorganized in order to compile with requirements for physical distancing and reducing overcrowding. The visits in outpatients’ units have been rescheduled, healthcare professionals have received information regarding the adequate use of protective personal equipment and patients have learnt how to protect themselves. Furthermore, telemental health approaches have been fostered worldwide, although several obstacles still persist such as the lack of adequate training for healthcare professionals for using telemental health instruments, the uncertainties regarding the legal implications of telemental health and the difficulties for older patients to access those systems. During this critical period, mental healthcare systems have been proven to be resilient. The pandemic has speed up the process of transformation of mental health care system and we are learning how to further improve the system in order to sustain these changes in the long-term.

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LIVE - Symposium: Evidence-Based Family Interventions in Perinatal Psychiatry (ID 634) No Topic Needed

S0049 - Development and Efficacy of a Psychoeducational Family Intervention for Perinatal Depression

Session Icon
Live
Date
Sun, 11.04.2021
Session Time
15:30 - 17:00
Room
Channel 1
Lecture Time
15:30 - 15:47
Presenter

ABSTRACT

Abstract Body

The perinatal period represents an at-risk period for mental health consequences, which has been overlooked for long time. Perinatal mental health problems constitute a relevant threat for long-term mental health, not only for the direct impact on the affected women, but also for the considerable foetal/infant morbidity and mortality.

Perinatal mental disorders are associated with negative outcomes in the newborn, including an increased risk of premature delivery and infant mortality, as well as a higher prevalence of mental disorders in the offspring (e.g., attention deficit or anxiety disorders). Depressive disorders represent the most common disorder during the perinatal period. For the adequate, appropriate and complete management of women with perinatal depression, there is the need for integrated interventions, following a comprehensive global assessment of women’s mental health. In particular, the management of depression during perinatal period requires special attention, even considering the problems and limitations in prescribing pharmacological drugs. In this context, psychoeducational interventions are effective in reducing affective symptoms and the levels of stress, with low costs for the mental health department.

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Symposium: The Four Views of the Future of Psychiatry (ID 335) No Topic Needed

S0135 - From Mentee to Mentor: Becoming an Early Career Professor in Psychiatry

Session Icon
Pre-Recorded with Live Q&A
Date
Mon, 12.04.2021
Session Time
08:00 - 09:30
Room
Channel 5
Lecture Time
08:34 - 08:51
Presenter

ABSTRACT

Abstract Body

In the last years several social, economic and scientific changes have occurred, which have had a significant impact on psychiatric clinical practice, research and training.

Some traditional syndromes seem to be disappeared, while new forms of mental health problems are coming to psychiatric consultation. The psychosocial distress caused by the current ongoing crisis due to the COVID-19 or the maladaptive use of the new technologies among the younger generation, are some good examples of psychosocial factors causing new mental health disturbances. Psychiatrists and mental health professionals are not yet well-equipped for managing these, which represent major unmet needs in modern clinical practice. Furthermore, in this evolving social context, the societal role of psychiatrists is completely changed, moving from being “alienist” working in asylums to “mental health care providers” working in the communities. The role of psychiatrists is to improve global mental health and to promote well-being in the general population according to a life-span perspective. Nowadays, early career psychiatrists report several unmet needs that we are not able to manage. In this symposium, I will describe my personal experience of moving from my role of mentee to mentor.

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LIVE - Symposium: Difficult to Treat Depression (ID 270) No Topic Needed

S0152 - Is Treatment Resistant Depression a Different Subtype of Depression?

Session Icon
Live
Date
Tue, 13.04.2021
Session Time
10:00 - 11:30
Room
Channel 1
Lecture Time
10:51 - 11:08
Presenter

ABSTRACT

Abstract Body

Major depression is a serious, disabling, often chronic or recurrent mental disorder affecting over 350 million people worldwide.

Treatment of major depression is now conceptualized as proceeding through three phases: the acute phase, the continuation phase, and the remission phase. Patients not achieving remission after several treatment trials are defined treatment-resistant, but a debate is ongoing regarding how many trials must fail before a patient can be defined as “treatment-resistant”. It must be acknowledged that depression is a heterogeneous disease, and several personal, socio-cultural and clinical factors should be taken into account in order to develop a personalized management plan for patients with major depression.

A new concept of “difficult to treat depression” has been recently proposed. According to this concept, when a complete control of the disorder is not feasible, the treatment should aim at minimizing the impact of symptoms and the side effects of treatments on patients’ daily lives. Moreover, the concept of difficult to treat depression includes the presence of co-occurring problems/ behaviours/ disorders/ situations, which can worsen the course or management of depression.

The management of patients with treatment resistant depression includes the optimization of disease management, in terms of symptom control, improvement of daily functioning and of quality of life. However, an approach aiming to personalize treatment of patients with major depressive disorder and focused on the specific clinical features of each patient can be valuable for optimizing the treatment of patients with resistant depression.

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Symposium: Psychosocial Imaging: Disentangling the Interplay Between Environmental Variables and Psychotic Disorders (ID 297) No Topic Needed

S0176 - The Complexity of Vulnerability to Psychosis

Session Icon
Pre-Recorded with Live Q&A, Section
Date
Tue, 13.04.2021
Session Time
17:30 - 19:00
Room
Channel 4
Lecture Time
18:21 - 18:38
Presenter

ABSTRACT

Abstract Body

Schizophrenia is a complex mental disorder, which has been recently conceptualized as a neurodevelopmental disease. This conceptualization has changed the psychopathological approach to schizophrenia, which is now described as lying on a continuum from mild psychotic experiences to frank psychotic episodes. According to this theory, the presence of psychotic symptoms would represent the final pathway of a complex dysregulation and interaction of different genetic and environmental risk factors.

As regards genetic liability, recent genome-wide association studies have identified a total of 108 loci containing common risk alleles, and which meet genome-wide significance. As regards environmental factors, higher rates of schizophrenia have been found in ethnic minority groups, in persons who are heavy cannabis smokers, in those who suffered from severe childhood traumas, in persons who have been reared in highly deprived settings. The identification of risk factors associated with vulnerability to psychosis is essential for improving our understanding and early detection of vulnerable individuals, and to propose tailored and timely interventions for sufferers. There is the need for an interdisciplinary approach to schizophrenia which includes screening procedures for individuals reporting specific vulnerabilities and treatment strategies tailored on patients’ needs.

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Workshop: Practical Suggestions on the Clinical, Ethical and Economic Consequences of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Mental Health (ID 271) No Topic Needed

W0014 - The Impact of Lockdown Measures on the Mental Health of the General Population: Results from a National Multicentric Study

Session Icon
Pre-Recorded with Live Q&A
Date
Sun, 11.04.2021
Session Time
10:00 - 11:30
Room
Channel 6
Lecture Time
10:55 - 11:06
Presenter

ABSTRACT

Abstract Body

The COVID-19 pandemic and the related containment measures, such as lockdown, are affecting mental health of the general population worldwide. This is an unprecedented event, which is influencing the health care, political, economic, and social welfare systems. Among Western countries, Italy has been one of the first severely hit by the pandemic in terms of number of cases and mortality rates. On March 8, 2020, the Italian Prime Minister issued restrictive measures in order to limit the spread of the disease. During this period known as “Phase one” of the national health emergency, all not necessary activities have been closed, more than 29,000 people have died and almost 100,000 people have been home-isolated, with strict lockdown measures.

The COvid Mental hEalth Trial (COMET) network, including ten university Italian sites and the National Institute of Health, has promoted a national online survey in order to evaluate the impact of lockdown measures on the mental health of the Italian general population. The COMET survey reports data from a large sample of more than 20.000 people from Italian general population, showing that lockdown has had a detrimental impact on mental health, in terms of worsening of anxiety, depressive and stress symptoms. Findings from this study can be useful to inform national and international associations, policy makers and stakeholders on the importance to provide adequate support to the mental health of the general population.

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