A. Sutter-Dallay, France

Bordeaux University and Charles Perrens Hospital Univ. Bordeaux, INSERM, BPH, U1219, F-33000 Bordeaux, France and Perinatal Psychiatry network-University department of child and adolescent psychiatry

Presenter Of 6 Presentations

Workshop: The Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Women’s Mental Health and Service Delivery: What Have we Learnt? (ID 200) No Topic Needed
LIVE - ECP Symposium: Perinatal Psychiatry: Is it All About the Mother? (ID 839) No Topic Needed

Live Q&A

LIVE - Symposium: Evidence-Based Family Interventions in Perinatal Psychiatry (ID 634) No Topic Needed

Live Q&A

Session Icon
Live
Date
Sun, 11.04.2021
Session Time
15:30 - 17:00
Room
Channel 1
Lecture Time
16:38 - 16:58
LIVE - ECP Symposium: Perinatal Psychiatry: Is it All About the Mother? (ID 839) No Topic Needed

ECP0002 - Joint Care of Parents and Infants in Perinatal Psychiatry

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Live, ECP Session
Date
Sun, 11.04.2021
Session Time
10:00 - 11:30
Room
Channel 2
Lecture Time
10:17 - 10:34

ABSTRACT

Abstract Body

In the perinatal period, about 15-20 % of women will present a mental health disorder. These disorders, as with all sources of psychological and physical stress in early childhood, especially the poor quality of parent-child relationships, are widely involved in predicting poor mental health in adulthood. The economic cost of perinatal mental health, corollary of this human cost, evaluated in 2014 would amount to £GBP 8.1 billion per annual birth cohort according to a UK report. This report highlights another fundamental element: 3/4 of the costs are associated with the deleterious consequences of parental psychological disorders on child development. The mechanisms involved in the relationship between parental psychiatric disorders and child development are complex. On the other hand, the influence of parental characteristics on the future of children can vary depending on social determinants such as familial income level.
During the perinatal period, parental mental health represents one of the keys to the infant development. Perinatal psychiatry allows a dual approach essential to deal with the complexity of perinatal psychiatry care, combining a curative aim (care of the parent) and a preventive one (preventing the risk of dysfunction in the process of becoming parents, in parent-child relationships and of impaired child developement). This intervention wil discuss how this interactive circle must be supported by perinatal mental health policies, of which the joint care of parents and infants (from parent-child psychotherapy to joint mother-baby hospitalisation) in perinatal psychiatry is a pivotal element.

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LIVE - Symposium: Evidence-Based Family Interventions in Perinatal Psychiatry (ID 634) No Topic Needed

S0050 - Perinatal Psychiatry and Families’ Mental Health: Evidence from some French Graduated and Integrated Practices

Session Icon
Live
Date
Sun, 11.04.2021
Session Time
15:30 - 17:00
Room
Channel 1
Lecture Time
15:47 - 16:04

ABSTRACT

Abstract Body

The first years of life represent a crucial period for psycho-affective development - the critical first 1000 days - because the events that happen to infants and babies during this period have psychosocial as well as epigenetic repercussions, with potential consequences throughout life and even for generations to come.

The interactive circle that will develop between the skills (and/or vulnerabilities) of infants and parents and the interactive features arising from each triad, must be supported by perinatal mental health policies, of which the joint care of parents and infants in perinatal psychiatry is a pivotal element. It is necessary to develop care pathways, with systems integrated into "usual" care that take into account families from the prenatal or even pre-conceptual period to the postnatal period,
Joint care must also be scalable and thus encompass everything from parent-child psychotherapy to joint mother-baby hospitalisation.

This intervention will present and discuss an example of a graduated, integrated and coordinated system of care, and will open up the perspective that perinatal clinicians must bear in mind that joint care is above all "a way of doing things", based on the notions of multidisciplinarity and prevention.

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Workshop: The Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Women’s Mental Health and Service Delivery: What Have we Learnt? (ID 200) No Topic Needed

W0037 - Treating Pregnant and Postnatal Women with Severe Mental Illness and Their Infants on a Specialised Inpatient Unit During a Pandemic: What Are the Challenges and Lessons Learnt?

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Pre-Recorded with Live Q&A, Section
Date
Mon, 12.04.2021
Session Time
10:00 - 11:30
Room
Channel 5
Lecture Time
10:28 - 10:42

ABSTRACT

Abstract Body

From the beginning of the pandemic, pregnant or postpartum women were considered particularly vulnerable.
In France, the vast majority of joint care for parents and infants facilities have seen their services closed or the number of people cared for greatly reduced to allow for social distancing to be respected.
This notion of social distancing is the antithesis of joint care work, the main objective of which is to support and care for the parent-infant bond by favoring social links
Services have had to take ownership of this new situation within a few days and develop new approaches, inventing ways of supporting and linking up at a distance.
This presentation will deal in detail with these changes and the solutions proposed, especially kind of home hospitalisations based on discussion groups, the development of programmes to support remote interactions, and also the development of work with fathers, who have been much more present than they usually are, due to the generalisation of teleworking.

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