M. Amering, Austria

Medical University of Vienna Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy
Michaela Amering is Professor of Psychiatry at the Medical University of Vienna, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Clinical Division of Social Psychiatry, with a focus of interest on psychosis and the development of the families` and the users` movements. She is a board member of the Austrian Association of Social Psychiatry and an Honorary Fellow of the European Society of Social Psychiatry. Her experience includes work in research and community psychiatry in the USA, UK, Germany and Ireland as well as engagement in international organisations such as EPA, WASP, WAPR and WPA, where she enjoys Honorary Membership as a Fellow.

Moderator Of 1 Session

Clinical/Therapeutic
Date
Sun, 11.04.2021
Session Time
10:00 - 11:30
Room
Channel 2
Session Description
The good management of mental disorders during pregnancy and lactation is a challenge for many psychiatrists. On the one hand, it is necessary to offer effective treatment options, while on the other hand to ensure the safety of the child before and after the delivery. The most up-to-date knowledge of what therapeutic interventions are available in this period, and in what clinical scenarios to apply them, is essential. The progress of evidence particularly for pharmacotherapy and its contraindications during pregnancy is constantly developing. During the Perinatal Psychiatry session at EPA Congress 2021, the topics such as parenting assessment in psychiatric mother and baby units, parents with mental and substance use disorders, and the role of perinatal care in early life trauma prevention will be presented and discussed, among others.
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Live, ECP Session

Presenter Of 5 Presentations

LIVE - ECP Symposium: Perinatal Psychiatry: Is it All About the Mother? (ID 839) No Topic Needed

Live Q&A

Tuesday, 13 April: Midday Roundup (ID 1166) No Topic Needed

Midday Roundup

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Live TV
Date
Tue, 13.04.2021
Session Time
13:00 - 13:30
Room
EPA TV
Lecture Time
13:00 - 13:30
LIVE - Opening Ceremony (ID 1176) No Topic Needed

Opening Ceremony

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Live
Date
Sat, 10.04.2021
Session Time
12:00 - 13:00
Room
Plenary
Lecture Time
12:00 - 13:00
Symposium with the European Institute for Women's Health: Mental Health of Women: What Can we do to Improve it? (ID 217) No Topic Needed

Live Q&A

Symposium with the European Institute for Women's Health: Mental Health of Women: What Can we do to Improve it? (ID 217) No Topic Needed

JS0001 - Mental Health and Human Rights of Women

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Pre-Recorded with Live Q&A
Date
Tue, 13.04.2021
Session Time
08:00 - 09:30
Room
Channel 5
Lecture Time
08:00 - 08:17

ABSTRACT

Abstract Body

Introduction: Mental health stigma and discrimination interact with gender inequality and the discrimination of women and girls to their mental health detriment.

Objectives: Present and discuss the challenges and opportunities of a human rights based approach to womens’ mental health.

Methods: Non-systematic review of policy and practice of human rights based interventions for womens’ mental health.

Results: Current mental health as well as gender equality legislation converge towards the realization of longstanding demands of equality for women as well as for persons with mental health problems: removal of barriers, respect and enablement of autonomy, renewed efforts toward effective inclusion in all spheres of life. Essential changes through non-discrimination laws concern key areas, including family planning, marriage and parenthood, employment, housing, education, health, standards of living and social, political and cultural participation, along with the right to be free from exploitation, violence and abuse. Because of the cumulation and the interaction of gender-based and other forms of discrimination, legislations such as the UN-Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UN-CRPD) include a focus on gender-specific human rights needs of women and girls. Family advocacy in mental health is prominently supported by female activists as is the user movement.

Conclusions: The opportunities of a successful development towards non-discrimination and gender equality in mental health care are dependent on a viable understanding of these concepts within the mental health community as well as updated expertise concerning tools for implementation of support systems sensitive to the human rights needs of women and girls.

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