D. Grande (Manhasset, US)

Northwell Health North Shore-Long Island
Daniel Grande is associate investigator and director of orthopaedic research at the Feinstein Institute for Medical research. He is also associate professor at the newly accredited Hofstra School of Medicine. He completed his PhD at New York University and his post-doctoral fellowship ion biomechanics at the Hospital for Special Surgery. He has worked extensively in the area of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. His early work developed the first use of cell based therapy for cartilage repair; currently known as autologus chondrocyte transplantation. He has served on committees with the Orthopaedic Research Society as spine topic chair and the basic science committee. Dr. Grande is significantly involved in mentoring and teaching of orthopaedic residents for his department. He has been a reviewer for a number of journals including: Journal of Orthopaedic Research; Clinical Orthopaedics; Osteoarthritis and Cartilage; American Journal of Sports Medicine; Nature Reviews Rheumatology and Applied Biomaterials. He has been awarded eight patents and helped found two companies in the orthopaedic surgery field of use. He has served as a member of several companies scientific advisory boards. He completed a five year rotation with OREF to assist in grant reviews. He also regularly serves on NIH study sections for RO1; R21; and SBIR/STTR grants specific to musculoskeletal applications.

Presenter Of 3 Presentations

Extended Abstract (for invited Faculty only) Please select your topic

1.2.3 - Exosomes for the Treatment of Post-Traumatic Osteoarthritis and Cartilage Injury of the Knee

Presentation Topic
Please select your topic
Date
12.04.2022
Lecture Time
12:30 - 12:45
Room
Potsdam 3
Session Type
Special Session
Extended Abstract (for invited Faculty only) Please select your topic

15.2.1 - Gene Therapy

Presentation Topic
Please select your topic
Date
14.04.2022
Lecture Time
09:45 - 10:00
Room
Bellevue
Session Type
Special Session
Poster Biomaterials and Scaffolds

P040 - Influence of Type I Collagen-Based Meniscus Scaffold and PRP on Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Differentiation Under Static Culture Condition

Presentation Topic
Biomaterials and Scaffolds
Date
13.04.2022
Lecture Time
09:30 - 09:30
Room
Exhibition Foyer
Session Name
7.3 - Poster Viewing / Coffee Break / Exhibition
Session Type
Poster Session
Disclosure
No Significant Commercial Relationship

Abstract

Purpose

The overall goal is to develop a type I collagen-based meniscus regeneration implant applying tissue engineering strategy. In the current study, platelet-rich plasma (PRP) was used to induce chondrogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hASC) in a novel type I collagen-based scaffold.

Methods and Materials

Briefly, 0.7% of purified type I collagen fibers in 0.07M lactic acid were swollen and homogenized. Aliquots of dispersion were adjusted to pH4.8 to reconstitute fibers. Fibers were oriented, molded, lyophilized, crosslinked, rinsed, and sterilized. High (HD) and low (LD) density scaffolds were produced.

Effects of human PRP (RegenLab) on hASCs (ATCC) proliferation and differentiation into chondrogenic cells were investigated. 2 × 106 hASCs were seeded onto scaffolds (n=5), i.e., LD, HD, LD+PRP and HD+PRP. 1% PRP was added to the media. Cell viability (Alamar Blue assay) was measured. Differentiation (primers: Collagen I and Aggrecan) was performed with quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Histology was used to evaluate cell distribution and ECM synthesis.

Data were analyzed using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). Statistical significance was set to value ≤ 0.05.

Results

Fig.1A shows that the cell growth kinetics were similar. Fig. 1B shows PRP and scaffold density had a positive effect on type I collagen gene expression, where the highest effect was observed at day 21. Fig. 1C shows the effect of PRP on gene expression of aggrecan. The amount of aggrecan expression was significantly elevated in the presence of PRP by day 21, a sign of chondrogenic differentiation of hASCs.

1.png

Fig. 2 shows a cellular migration within the interior of the scaffolds in all groups at day 21.

2.png

Conclusion

This study shows that scaffold properties and PRP can play an important role in directing hASC towards chondrogenic differentiation in vitro. The effect of biomechanical stress produced by dynamic loading on the chondrogenic differentiation of hADSC is currently being investigated.

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Moderator Of 2 Sessions

Bellevue Special Session
Session Type
Special Session
Date
14.04.2022
Time
09:45 - 10:45
Room
Bellevue
Session Description
Worldwide experts present the feasibility of applying gene therapy in direct and indirect forms, including via genome editing, for cartilage repair.
Session Learning Objective
  1. Participants will learn how to manipulate gene vehicles and the novel genome editing technology to improve the currently available clinical cartilage repair procedures.
CME Evaluation
Potsdam 3 Special Session
Session Type
Special Session
Date
14.04.2022
Time
16:00 - 17:00
Room
Potsdam 3
Session Description
Worldwide experts share information on the importance of host responses to implants, grafts, materials, cell therapy, and environmental stress in patients with cartilage injuries and osteoarthritis.
Session Learning Objective
  1. Participants will acquire knowledge on how patients may react to therapies based on cell, tissue, and material implantation.
CME Evaluation

Meeting Participant Of

Glienicke Board Room (18) ICRS Committee Meeting

Executive Board Meeting

Session Type
ICRS Committee Meeting
Date
12.04.2022
Time
08:00 - 09:45
Room
Glienicke Board Room (18)
Session Description
Only for invited Committee Members
Bellevue Plenary Session
Session Type
Plenary Session
Date
14.04.2022
Time
17:30 - 18:30
Room
Bellevue
Session Description
All ICRS members, present in Berlin are expected to attend the ICRS General Member’s Assembly. Retired Members and Corporate Members have no right to vote but are most welcome to attend. It is of utmost importance that as many members as possible attend this important meeting and take part in decision-making and approval processes of our association.