D. Saris (Rochester, US)

Mayo Clinic Orthopedics
Daniël Saris (Past President of ICRS) is a specialized knee surgeon. He joined the Orthopedics staff of Mayo Clinic in Rochester MN USA where he helps shape the Regenerative Medicine program and sports knee surgery and adult knee reconstruction. Daniel Saris graduated from University of Amsterdam Medical School. During orthopedic residency dr. Saris did a fellowship at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester MN USA and subsequently completed a PhD at the University of Utrecht in the Netherlands that introduced the now generally accepted concept of joint homeostasis. He practiced as staff member in the department of Orthopaedics at the UMC Utrecht for 17 years where he started The Mobility Clinic; an academical expert clinic for Musculoskeletal care. Prof Saris was part of the management team of the RM & stem cells focus at the UMC Utrecht and head of the orthopaedic residency program. He now has his clinical practice at Mayo Clinic Rochester and holds academical appointments as professor of Reconstructive Medicine at the University of Utrecht; as Clinical professor at the University of Twente and as professor of Orthopedics at Mayo Medical school

Presenter Of 6 Presentations

Extended Abstract (for invited Faculty only) Please select your topic

1.3.3 - Surgeon vs Scientist Gap - The Surgeon Perspective

Presentation Topic
Please select your topic
Date
12.04.2022
Lecture Time
12:13 - 12:18
Room
Bellevue
Session Type
Special Session
Extended Abstract (for invited Faculty only) Please select your topic

2.0.4 - Redefine the Goals of Cartilage Repair – What is Next?

Presentation Topic
Please select your topic
Date
12.04.2022
Lecture Time
14:00 - 14:15
Room
Potsdam 1
Session Type
Plenary Session
Podium Presentation Cartilage /Cell Transplantation

18.3.6 - One-Stage Cartilage Recycling Facilitated by Adipose MSCs Safe and Clinically Effective (RECLAIM)

Presentation Topic
Cartilage /Cell Transplantation
Date
14.04.2022
Lecture Time
15:00 - 15:09
Room
Potsdam 1
Session Type
Free Papers
Disclosure
Dr. D.B. Saris, Cartilage: Governing board, JRF: Research, Smith & Nephew. Dr. A.J. Krych, Arthrex, Inc, study conduct; grants from Aesculap/B.Braun, Ceterix, Histogenics, ICRS. Dr. A.B. Dietz, inventor, Mill Creek Life Sciences

Abstract

Purpose

Working towards safe and reliable one stage cell-based cartilage repair requires FDA monitored IND validation of MSC facilitated cartilage repair. This study evaluates the reproducibility and novel allogeneic cell source and allows comparison to a European cohort.The purpose of this study was to assess the safety and initial clinical outcomes following REcycled CartiLage Auto/Allo IMplantation for the Treatment of Focal Knee Cartilage Defects (RECLAIM).

Methods and Materials

This was a single-arm interventional FDA IND study conducted on 25 patients with age ranging between 21 and 40 years old. Following the RECLAIM procedure, patients were queried for adverse events, clinical outcomes were evaluated using patient reported outcomes that included the KOOS (Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score), visual analog scale for pain. Repeated measure analysis ANOVA was used to test statistical significance p<.5. Results for all treated patients with a minimum of 12 months follow up or earlier safety issue are reported.

Results

Among 13 participants who completed the 12-month follow-up there were no treatment related adverse event. Complications and adverse events were as predicted from previous studies. Participants experienced clinically relevant and statistically significant improvements in mean VAS pain and all KOOS subscales scores at 3, 6 and 12 months. (Figure1).

icrs_repetedmeasures_figue1.jpg

Conclusion

RECLAIM is a feasible one-stage cartilage regeneration option, demonstrating good safety profile and encouraging clinical outcomes in this phase 1 trial. Also, improvements in pain, function, and quality of life were achieved in this small cohort of patients with symptomatic cartilage defects of the knee. Overall, these results provide external validation and confirm comparability, safety and initial effectiveness of IMPACT and RECLAIM procedure.

Collapse
Extended Abstract (for invited Faculty only) Please select your topic

22.1.2 - Clinical Therapy: Current Progress

Presentation Topic
Please select your topic
Date
15.04.2022
Lecture Time
08:45 - 09:00
Room
Potsdam 1
Session Type
Plenary Session
Extended Abstract (for invited Faculty only) Platelet Rich Plasma and Growth factors

23.1.7 - Do We Really Need PRP? Con

Presentation Topic
Platelet Rich Plasma and Growth factors
Date
15.04.2022
Lecture Time
10:00 - 10:05
Room
Potsdam 1
Session Type
Plenary Session
Podium Presentation Cartilage /Cell Transplantation

24.2.7 - Minced Cartilage Procedure for One-Stage Arthroscopic Repair of Chondral Defects in the Hip Joint

Presentation Topic
Cartilage /Cell Transplantation
Date
15.04.2022
Lecture Time
11:54 - 12:03
Room
Potsdam 3
Session Type
Free Papers
Disclosure
No Significant Commercial Relationship

Abstract

Purpose

To (1) validate a harvesting technique using arthroscopic shaver to collect articular cartilage from the femoral head and to (2) compare the chondron yield and chondron viability to a manual mincing method and a device assisted mincing procedure.

Methods and Materials

Femoral heads were collected from patients with avascular necrosis of the femoral head who underwent total hip arthroplasty (THA) and processed in the laboratory. A 4.0 mm arthroscopic shaver with an attached chondral fragment capture device (GraftNet) was used to harvest the chondral surface from the area of the non-weight bearing regions of the femoral head. The cells were filtered and chondrocytes were isolated by enzymatic digestion. Cells were counted and stained with a live-dead stain and Safranin-O.

Results

16 cartilage samples were processed in total. 12 samples underwent manual processing (surgical removal of cartilage from bone by scalpel, manual mincing with scalpel or mincing device) and 4 samples were retrieved with a 4.0 mm arthroscopic shaver. The different methods produced cartilage particulate of significantly different sizes. Manual mincing with a scalpel or mincing device resulted in larger particles than shaver harvest. Cell yield and viability were comparable between the groups.

figure 1.jpg

Figure 1. Chondron cluster with typical nuclei and extracellular matrix in an arthroscopic shaver sample

asis 1 intact chondrons.jpg

Figure 2. 4 chondrons in an arthroscopic shaver sample

Conclusion

The proposed harvesting method produces a high cell yield and good cell viability with a limited amount of debris. Future studies are needed to focus on short- and long-term outcomes of clinical application, as well as safety and efficacy, and to compare the results with other cartilage restoration and harvesting procedures of the hip.

Collapse