S. Frangou, United States of America

Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Department of Psychiatry

Moderator Of 3 Sessions

EPA Course
Date
Tue, 13.04.2021
Session Time
15:00 - 17:00
Room
Courses Hall A
Session Description
Scientific research is essential in improving care of patients with mental health problems. European Psychiatry is the official journal of the European Psychiatric Association and is published since 1986 with the aim to improve the lives of patients with psychiatric disorders and to promote professional excellence through education and research. The course will provide essential information on how to write and successfully publish a paper in European Psychiatry. The teachers of the course are the two editors of the journal who will actively interact with participants in order to improve their writing skills. In particular, during the course, participants will be invited to discuss their experience with scientific journals and will be provided with practical suggestions on how to write good papers. Participants will be guided through the journey of publication from the hypothesis-based approach to Editor’s expectations until acceptance of manuscripts.
Session Icon
Live, Ticket Required
EPA Course
Date
Sat, 10.04.2021
Session Time
16:30 - 18:30
Room
Courses Hall D
Session Description
In the era of personalised and integrated mental health care, neuroscience will play an increasing role in psychiatry. To take advantage of this, clinicians need a robust foundation in neuroscience. Most psychiatrists are not experts in neuroscience, but they need to be knowledgeable enough and confident enough to effectively integrate into patient care the advances that will be made during their working lives. Early Career Psychiatrists and more established clinicians need to be prepared to model this integration for psychiatrists in training, because the next generation of psychiatrists, more than any before, will need to be able to understand, critically evaluate and translate new research findings into improved clinical care for their patients. This course will present an immersive experience of this new era of integrated neuroscience. Participants will gain experience of innovative strategies for teaching and learning in a range of settings, including patient education. Participants will take part in facilitated pair- and group-work, including role play of psychiatrist-patient interactions, and teaching scenarios, using examples of relevant knowledge and understanding gained from cutting-edge neuroscience research. Participants will interact closely with speakers to highlight and exchange best practice and to identify opportunities for adaptation of strategies to different national contexts. On completion of the course, our aim is that participants will better understand techniques to integrate modern neuroscience into psychiatric training and will have increased confidence in their didactic skills.
Session Icon
Live, Ticket Required
Educational
Date
Mon, 12.04.2021
Session Time
19:30 - 21:00
Room
Channel 5
Session Description
The Live Q&A of this session will take place in the Live Sessions auditorium. Please refer to the interactive programme for the exact time and channel.

Bipolar disorder is a severe mental disorder associated with high levels of personal and societal burden. Although several pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions have been developed and are currently available in the routine the long-term treatment of bipolar patients, the rate of functional recovery is not very satisfying yet. Many unmet needs are still present in the optimal management of bipolar patients, including diagnostic, clinical and therapeutic challenges.  New perspectives are emerging for improving the clinical and functional outcomes of patients suffering from bipolar disorder. In particular, it has been recently argued that the optimal management of bipolar patients requires the evaluation of patient’s personal history according to a longitudinal perspective. In this conceptual framework, the construct of predominant polarity has been proposed by Colom for describing the predominant type of affective episodes according to a lifetime perspective. The predominant polarity has several therapeutic and prognostic implications for the long-term management of bipolar patients. Furthermore, neuroimaging correlates have recently confirmed the prognostic role of predominant polarity, highlighting the relevance of such index from a clinical perspective. In this symposium, the role of neuroimaging correlates of predominant polarity will be presented. Moreover, further new perspectives in the field of research in bipolar disorder are recently focusing on the role of childhood maltreatment and expression of symptoms during childhood as relevant predictors of long-term outcome. There is the need to translate the model of early interventions to the context of affective disorders, in order to significantly improve the long-term outcome of bipolar patients.

Session Icon
Pre-Recorded with Live Q&A

Presenter Of 6 Presentations

Symposium: New Perspectives on Bipolar Disorder (ID 291) No Topic Needed

Live Q&A

Session Icon
Pre-Recorded with Live Q&A
Date
Mon, 12.04.2021
Session Time
19:30 - 21:00
Room
Channel 5
Lecture Time
20:38 - 20:58
Symposium: Psychosocial Imaging: Disentangling the Interplay Between Environmental Variables and Psychotic Disorders (ID 297) No Topic Needed
Course 08: Reshaping Training: Integrating Modern Neuroscience to Prepare Modern Clinical Psychiatrists (ID 138) No Topic Needed

Reshaping Training: Integrating Modern Neuroscience to Prepare Modern Clinical Psychiatrists

Session Icon
Live, Ticket Required
Date
Sat, 10.04.2021
Session Time
16:30 - 18:30
Room
Courses Hall D
Lecture Time
16:30 - 18:30
Course 18: How to Write a Scientific Paper (ID 296) No Topic Needed

How to Write a Scientific Paper

Session Icon
Live, Ticket Required
Date
Tue, 13.04.2021
Session Time
15:00 - 17:00
Room
Courses Hall A
Lecture Time
15:00 - 17:00
Symposium: New Perspectives on Bipolar Disorder (ID 291) No Topic Needed

S0122 - The Relevance of Manic Symptoms in Childhood

Session Icon
Pre-Recorded with Live Q&A
Date
Mon, 12.04.2021
Session Time
19:30 - 21:00
Room
Channel 5
Lecture Time
19:47 - 20:04

ABSTRACT

Abstract Body

Background: The Adolescent Brain and Cognitive Development (ABCD) study, a US population-based sample of 10 year-olds, offers a unique opportunity to examine the neural correlates of manic-like symptoms presenting in children about to enter adolescence. Methods: The study will avail of the rich dataset of over 11,000 children aged 9-10 years at enrolment using data from the baseline and 2-year follow-up assessment. The analyses aim to track the evolution of manic-like symptoms between the two follow-up waves and test their sensitivity of their association with brain correlates. Results: Data analyses are ongoing and will focus on changes in manic-like symptoms, focusing on youth with remitting, persistent and emerging symptoms and examine their associations with brain structure and resting-state functional connectivity. Conclusions: The results will inform about the early trajectory of manic-like symptoms and offer new insights into their brain-related correlates.

Hide
Symposium: Psychosocial Imaging: Disentangling the Interplay Between Environmental Variables and Psychotic Disorders (ID 297) No Topic Needed

S0173 - Psychosocial Adversity and the Developing Brain: Findings From the ABCD Study on 11,000 US Children

Session Icon
Pre-Recorded with Live Q&A, Section
Date
Tue, 13.04.2021
Session Time
17:30 - 19:00
Room
Channel 4
Lecture Time
17:30 - 17:47

ABSTRACT

Abstract Body

Background: Childhood exposure to social risk has the potential to disrupt brain development and increase vulnerability to adverse mental health outcomes. Here, we examine the effect of adversity on brain structure and psychopathology in the Adolescent Brain and Cognitive Development (ABCD) study, a US population-based sample of 10 year-olds. Methods: Personal, caregiver, family and neighborhood characteristics were considered in 9299 unrelated children [age: mean (sd)=9.9 y (0.6); 53% males]. Hidden Markov Models were used identify clusters of participants based on their psychosocial exposure. The identified clusters were compared in terms of current psychopathology, lifetime psychiatric diagnosis, intelligence and brain structure. Results: ABCD participants clustered in to a “disadvantaged” group (N=4205) with multiple adverse exposures, and an “enriched” group (N= 5094) with limited exposure to adversity and multiple protective factors. . Compared to the enriched group, the disadvantaged group had higher levels of all types of psychopathology and lifetime psychiatric diagnoses; lower scores on fluid and crystallized intelligence; smaller subcortical volumes; thinner sensorimotor cortices and thicker cortex in frontal regions; smaller surface area in temporal regions and larger surface area in the posterior cingulate cortices (all p<0.05 following Bonferroni correction for multiple testing). Conclusions: Social adversity has significant and wide-ranging consequences for brain development and psychopathology, that shows little specificity for types of symptoms.

Hide