National Institute for Communicable Diseases
Centre for Respiratory Diseases and Meningitis
I’m an enthusiastic epidemiologist, passionate about learning and mastering new concepts, and enjoy playing an active role in training activities and to provide epidemiological support, mentorship and supervision to students and colleagues. In my current role, I support the development and implementation of epidemiological studies: from assisting in protocol writing and logistics for field implementation, through to data management, cleaning and analysis, as well as result dissemination through reports, conference presentations and peer-review publications. My PhD focuses on how social contact patterns influence the transmission of SARS-CoV-2. My primary research interests include the epidemiology of respiratory diseases like influenza and COVID-19, vaccine impact studies, contact patterns in the context of disease transmission, and modelling of infectious disease transmission dynamics.

Moderator Of 2 Sessions

Workshop 01: Epidemiological Data Analysis (1) Evaluating Disease Burden and Vaccine Impact Using Time Series Administrative Data

Session Type
On-site Pre-Symposium Workshop
Date
Sun, 19.06.2022
Session Time
09:00 - 12:00
Room
Grand Ballroom Centre
Session Description
The workshop will be a mix of didactic presentation and hands on data analysis through some worked examples. We will focus on interrupted time series analysis and synthetic controls analysis, discussing the concepts, the mechanics of setting up and running the analyses in R, and the interpretation of results. Attendees will be asked to register for a free account on a free web-based platform for using R (rstudio.cloud) and to optionally view videos on an "Introduction to R" and 'Data Wrangling in R" before attending.

Please note: All ISPPD-12 Workshops are highly interactive and designed to allow at least 25% active learning for the maximum registrants anticipated.
Session Type
Parallel Session
Date
Mon, 20.06.2022
Session Time
15:20 - 16:35
Room
Grand Ballroom Centre
Session Description
Please note: Each presentation is followed by about 3 minutes of Q&A. The audience is encouraged to send questions to the speakers from the beginning of their presentations. Q&A time is included in each speaker’s presentation duration, accounting for at least 25% active learning for the maximum registrants anticipated.

Presenter Of 1 Presentation

O068 - REDUCTIONS IN LABORATORY-CONFIRMED INVASIVE PNEUMOCOCCAL DISEASE DURING SARS-COV-2 PANDEMIC, 2020-2021, SOUTH AFRICA (ID 893)

Session Type
Parallel Session
Date
Wed, 22.06.2022
Session Time
15:05 - 16:50
Room
Grand Ballroom Centre
Lecture Time
17:47 - 17:55

Abstract

Background

The first laboratory-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 case in South Africa was reported 5 March 2020. Followed by the implementation of varying SARS-CoV-2 containment measures, resulting in a lack of the typical seasonal influenza in 2020 and 2021, on a background of four SARS-COV-2 infection waves. We determined the change in invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) cases during this time.

Methods

National, laboratory-based IPD data from an established surveillance system was used to perform interrupted time series analysis to compare IPD diagnoses pre-(2012-2019) and during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic (2020-2021) overall, by PCV13 serotype and age group.

Results

During 2012-2021 we enrolled 23,759 IPD cases, ranging from 3,223 in 2012 to 1,241 in 2020. Compared to 2012-2019 trends, IPD diagnoses in South Africa reduced by 42% (95%CI 40%-44%) in 2020 and 23% (95%CI 22%-25%) in 2021. Except for children aged 2-4 years in 2021, all age groups saw a reduction of IPD diagnoses. The highest reductions were seen in adults aged ≥65 years (53% [95%CI 46%-58%] in 2020 and 50% [95%CI 45%-54%] in 2021). There were similar reductions in PCV13 and non-PCV13 serotype IPD (41%, [95%CI 38%-44%] vs 46%, [95%CI 43%-48%]).

plot_saipd_2022-04-12.jpg

Figure. Observed IPD cases (grey), trend (black) and predicted (red)

Conclusions

We observed a marked reduction in IPD diagnoses during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, with larger reductions in the first year of the pandemic where restrictions were more stringent compared to the second. Reductions may be attributed to the introduction of non-pharmaceutical interventions that reduced transmission of pneumococcus, reduced healthcare-seeking behaviour, or reduced sample collection for diagnosis.

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