Yale University School of Public Health
Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases
I'm an Associate Research Scientist in the Public Health Modeling Unit at the Yale School of Public Health. My work involves surveillance and analyses of pneumococcal epidemiology, pneumococcal vaccines, and pneumococcal vaccination strategies. I was raised in the midwestern United States, but have also lived in Mexico, Spain, and Germany. I earned my doctorate in Medical Microbiology from RWTH Aachen in 2019, during which I worked at the German National Reference Center for Streptococci. My non-work interests include hiking, science fiction, and gardening. This year, we're growing grapes, strawberries, blueberries, raspberries, pumpkins, and peppers.

Moderator Of 2 Sessions

Workshop 01: Epidemiological Data Analysis (1) Evaluating Disease Burden and Vaccine Impact Using Time Series Administrative Data

Session Type
On-site Pre-Symposium Workshop
Date
Sun, 19.06.2022
Session Time
09:00 - 12:00
Room
Grand Ballroom Centre
Session Description
The workshop will be a mix of didactic presentation and hands on data analysis through some worked examples. We will focus on interrupted time series analysis and synthetic controls analysis, discussing the concepts, the mechanics of setting up and running the analyses in R, and the interpretation of results. Attendees will be asked to register for a free account on a free web-based platform for using R (rstudio.cloud) and to optionally view videos on an "Introduction to R" and 'Data Wrangling in R" before attending.

Please note: All ISPPD-12 Workshops are highly interactive and designed to allow at least 25% active learning for the maximum registrants anticipated.
Session Type
Parallel Session
Date
Mon, 20.06.2022
Session Time
15:20 - 16:35
Room
Grand Ballroom East
Session Description
Please note: Each presentation is followed by about 3 minutes of Q&A. The audience is encouraged to send questions to the speakers from the beginning of their presentations. Q&A time is included in each speaker’s presentation duration, accounting for at least 25% active learning for the maximum registrants anticipated.

Presenter Of 1 Presentation

O014 - RAPID, UNEVEN REBOUND IN REPORTED INVASIVE PNEUMOCOCCAL DISEASE DURING THE SARS-COV-2 PANDEMIC IN THE UNITED STATES (ID 698)

Session Type
Parallel Session
Date
Mon, 20.06.2022
Session Time
15:20 - 16:35
Room
Grand Ballroom East
Lecture Time
15:25 - 15:35

Abstract

Background

Endemic respiratory diseases decreased worldwide in the fall and winter of 2020, concurrent with nonpharmaceutical interventions (NPIs) implemented to slow transmission of SARS-CoV-2. Different levels and durations of NPIs were implemented in the United States, with varying levels of adherence, throughout 2020 and 2021.

Methods

The CDC compiles weekly reported invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) cases from state health departments. A baseline of IPD cases from 2016-2019 was compared to weekly IPD cases in 2020 and in 2021. These reports were compared to mobility data from cellular phone location reports, to a composite measurement of stringency to NPIs, and to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) levels. Bivariate comparisons were done with Spearman correlations.

Results

In 2020, all states and regional groupings showed decreases in IPD from baseline levels. By the end of 2021, almost all states showed a consistent return to baseline IPD levels, though the timing of the return to normalcy varied geographically. Returns to baseline levels of IPD might be correlated with NPI stringency, changes in mobility patterns, and local RSV levels. The surveillance system for IPD experienced more reporting irregularities in 2020, as measured by an increase in discrepancies between initial and final case count values.

Conclusions

The decreases in IPD during the first year of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic in the US were temporary, returning to baseline levels in 2021. The rate of return to baseline levels of IPD is likely multifactorial.

Hide