S. Le Hellard, Norway

University of Bergen Clinical Science
I am a molecular biologist and I have been working on risk factors for mental disorders since 1994. After many years with focus on genetics, I am now mostly studying epigenetic aspects of mental disorders across diagnoses (psychoses and anxiety) and models with using clinical samples as well biological models.

Moderator of 1 Session

Educational
Date
Mon, 12.04.2021
Session Time
17:30 - 19:00
Room
Channel 1
Session Description
In 2020 the COVID19 affected most of the world and many countries had to put in place special restrictions in order to slow down the progression of the infection. The virus outbreak and the restrictions had profound effects at many level on the society. This symposium will explore several research projects started in Europe to look at the effects of the pandemia on mental health, psychological factors and coping.
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Live

Presenter of 3 Presentations

LIVE - Symposium: Epigenetics in Mental Disorders (ID 636) No Topic Needed

Live Q&A

LIVE - Symposium: Consequences of COVID-19 Outbreak on Mental Health (ID 613) No Topic Needed
LIVE - Symposium: Epigenetics in Mental Disorders (ID 636) No Topic Needed

S0119 - Epigenetic Association with Environmental Risk Factors for Mental Disorders

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Live
Date
Mon, 12.04.2021
Session Time
19:30 - 21:00
Room
Channel 2
Lecture Time
20:04 - 20:21

ABSTRACT

Abstract Body

Major mental disorders have typically a complex aetiology where both genetic and environmental risk factors have been implicated. It has also been suggested that these risk factors could be interactive rather than just additional. In the last decade, large genetic studies have began to unravel the genetic architecture of several of these disorders. While the mechanisms of action of environmental risk factors are still unclear.

At the molecular level, gene expression can be regulated at the epigenetic level, e.g. chromatin modifications or DNA methylation. Epigenetic modifications can be affected by both genetic variations as well as environment variations.

In this presentation, we will review recent results either from literature or from own data on how several known environmental risks for mental disorders can be associated with modifications of epigenetic markers, especially in DNA methylation. We will for instance look at the modifications associated with smoking, alcohol, cannabis, childhood trauma or obstetric complications. We will discuss also the limits of these studies and how epigenetic modifications can be relevant for the onset of mental disorders and their treatment.

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