B. Völlm, Germany

University of Rostock Forensic Psychiatry
Prof. Dr. med. Birgit Völlm PhD MRCPsych DiplForPsych Prof Völlm has been Professor of Forensic Psychiatry and Director of the Hospital of Forensic Psychiatry at the University of Rostock since September 2018. Bevor then she was Professor in Forensic Psychiatry at the University of Nottingham, UK, and a Consultant Forensic Psychiatrist in the enhanced service for personality disorders at Rampton high secure hospital. Her main research interests include the neurobiology of personality disorders and social cognition, treatment of personality disorders, service development, comparisons between services in different countries and ethical issues in forensic-psychiatric care. Prof Völlm has held national and European grants on long-stay, the effectiveness of Individual Placement Support and on Circles of Support and Accountability. She has published nearly 150 scientific papers and book chapters. Prof Völlm was the Chair of the Forensic Section of the European Psychiatric Association from 2012 – 2016 and has been the Chair of the Forensic Section of the World Psychiatric Association since 2020. Prof Völlm is a regular expert for the Committee for the Prevention of Torture and Inhumane and Degrading Treatment (CPT).

Moderator Of 2 Sessions

EPA Course
Date
Mon, 12.04.2021
Session Time
15:00 - 17:00
Room
Courses Hall A
Session Description
Peer support work is an important part of mental health care. This is a particularly useful approach in inpatient settings where patients’ interactions with family, friends and others outside the care setting may be limited. Peer support work is beneficial for both patients and peer supporters themselves, as this bridges staff-patient gaps. Peer supporters are able to share positive experiences with patients and patients might find it helpful to receive support from someone they feel they can relate to. Peer support has a long tradition but is still novel in many mental health settings. This course will guide participants through the process of involving peer support workers within an inpatient care setting. It will present factors that may help or hinder this process. Special attention will be paid to organizational culture, the role of team leaders, attitudes of staff and patients, and administrative hurdles. This course will discuss some of the difficulties of involving peer support workers in specialized settings, such as forensic mental health clinics. It is important that peer supporters are themselves supported throughout this process, especially if they are new. Therefore, the course will address approaches to maintaining the wellbeing and occupational health of peer supporters. Participants will be given learning materials and vignettes that encourage them to reflect on how peer support may be implemented or sustained in their own care settings.
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Live, Ticket Required
Mental Health Policy
Date
Sun, 11.04.2021
Session Time
17:30 - 19:00
Room
Channel 6
Session Description
The Live Q&A of this session will take place in the Live Sessions auditorium. Please refer to the interactive programme for the exact time and channel.

Psychiatry relies upon self-reports to access the patient's inner world, more than most specialties. In forensic psychiatry the risk of secondary gain distorting events is substantially higher than elsewhere. With estimates of exaggeration being between 15%-40% we need better tools than 'clinical impression' to assess the validity of claims and reports. Dr Torenc (Portugal) will take us through the twists and turns that prisoners take to persuade us of their illnesses, of why they may feign for benefit and how to manage them. Dr Wise (UK) will discuss some of the issues that medical personnel face when using these tests, including attacks on their credibility; examples from court cases will demonstrate possible solutions. On the other hand in recent years the introduction of peer support workers (PSW), individuals with personal experience of mental health problems who have recovered and support those with current mental health difficulties, has been recommended. Evidence suggests gains of such interventions, particularly in psychosocial outcomes. The introduction of PSW in mental health settings poses particular challenges. Dr. Drennan will talk about developments in governance for lived experience roles in forensic in-patient treatment programmes. Ms Walde will add a German perspective about the preparation and implementation of a peer support worker in a forensic hospital for offenders with substance use disorders.

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Pre-Recorded with Live Q&A

Presenter Of 4 Presentations

Course 14: Peer Support Workers in Inpatient Mental Health Settings (ID 71) No Topic Needed

Peer Support Workers in Inpatient Mental Health Settings

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Live, Ticket Required
Date
Mon, 12.04.2021
Session Time
15:00 - 17:00
Room
Courses Hall A
Lecture Time
15:00 - 17:00
Symposium: On a Level Playing Field with Forensic Patients? (ID 208) No Topic Needed

Live Q&A

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Pre-Recorded with Live Q&A
Date
Sun, 11.04.2021
Session Time
17:30 - 19:00
Room
Channel 6
Lecture Time
18:38 - 18:58
LIVE - ECP Symposium: Treatment Against Your Will: Views from the Stakeholders (ID 842) No Topic Needed
LIVE - ECP Symposium: Treatment Against Your Will: Views from the Stakeholders (ID 842) No Topic Needed

ECP0005 - Inpatient Forensic Psychiatric Care: Legal Provision in European Countries

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Live, ECP Session
Date
Sun, 11.04.2021
Session Time
15:30 - 17:00
Room
Channel 2
Lecture Time
15:30 - 15:47
Presenter

ABSTRACT

Abstract Body

Forensic psychiatry is a specialty of psychiatry primarily concerned with individuals who have either offended or present a risk of doing so, and who also suffer from a psychiatric condition. These mentally disordered offenders(MDOs) are often cared for in secure psychiatric environments or prisons. However, the organisation of these services differs greatly between countries due to different traditions and legal frameworks. Some countries, e. g., require absent or reduced criminal responsibility (at the time of the index offence) in order to enter forensic services while others determine access on the basis of current need for treatment. Numbers detained in forensic services also vary significantly as does length of stay, raising significant economic and ethical challenges. This talk will present different legal concepts determining admission to forensic-psychiatric services, data on length of stay as well as approaches to risk assessment and treatment in Europe.

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