F. Gressier, France

Bicêtre University Hospital, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Hôpitaux Universitaires Paris Saclay, Department of Psychiatry,
Florence Gressier (MD, PhD, HDR) is a psychiatrist, and responsible of Perinatal Psychiatry (including an inpatient mother-baby psychiatric unit, liaison psychiatry services, and perinatal consultations) at Bicêtre University Hospital - Department of Psychiatry, in Le Kremlin Bicêtre, France. She is also a member of the research team at CESP, Inserm UMR1178, Faculté de Médecine Paris-Saclay, Université Paris-Saclay. After her PhD degree, she completed a post-doctoral year in pharmacogenetics, in Bologna, Italy (2011-2012). Florence Gressier has undertaken research in perinatal psychiatry in France over the last ten years. Since 2011, she has been involved in the Francophone Marcé Society and is presently the past-President.

Moderator Of 1 Session

Clinical/Therapeutic
Date
Tue, 13.04.2021
Session Time
10:00 - 11:30
Room
Channel 4
Session Description
The Live Q&A of this session will take place in the Live Sessions auditorium. Please refer to the interactive programme for the exact time and channel.

Proposed by the EPA Section on Women, Gender and Mental Health -The risk of new onsets and recurrences of affective psychosis and bipolar disorder is increased in the peripartum period, and in the first weeks after childbirth it is the highest than at any other time in a woman’s life. The first speaker will present recent findings from his and other research groups on the biological and psychosocial causation of this phenomenon. The second speaker will present recent data from a population study examining the strength of the association of parental mental illness and risk of injury to the offspring. Findings will be reported not only for maternal but also paternal mental illness, for common and severe mental disorders and for children in the first year of life versus older age groups. Increasing evidence shows that pregnancy has differential effects on the pharmacokinetics of psychotropic drugs. Large drops of plasma levels have been reported for some agents, potentially placing some pregnant women with severe mental illness at a greater risk of recurrence. The third speaker will discuss current pharmacokinetic and clinical research and make recommendations for therapeutic drug monitoring in the preconception, pregnancy and early postnatal period. Although suicide attempts in the perinatal period can lead to significant complications for pregnancy and child outcomes, they have received little attention in research. The fourth speaker will present recent findings on the prevalence of suicide attempts in pregnancy and the postnatal period and the profiles of risk factors from a large sample of women treated in mother and baby inpatient units.

Session Icon
Pre-Recorded with Live Q&A, Section

Presenter Of 2 Presentations

Symposium: Severe Mental Illness in the Perinatal Period: Recognising and Managing Risks (ID 357) No Topic Needed

Live Q&A

Session Icon
Pre-Recorded with Live Q&A, Section
Date
Tue, 13.04.2021
Session Time
10:00 - 11:30
Room
Channel 4
Lecture Time
11:08 - 11:28
Symposium: Severe Mental Illness in the Perinatal Period: Recognising and Managing Risks (ID 357) No Topic Needed

S0164 - Suicide Attempts in Women with Severe Mental Illness in the Perinatal Period

Session Icon
Pre-Recorded with Live Q&A, Section
Date
Tue, 13.04.2021
Session Time
10:00 - 11:30
Room
Channel 4
Lecture Time
10:51 - 11:08

ABSTRACT

Abstract Body

Suicide is one of the leading causes of perinatal maternal mortality (1). Maternal suicidality has a negative impact on the mother-baby relationship and child development. However, little is known about specific risk factors for perinatal suicide attempts in women with severe mental illness.

In a sample of 1439 women with severe mental illness in the perinatal period and jointly admitted with their baby in a mother and baby unit, 154 (11.7%) attempted suicide, 49 in pregnancy (3.7%) and 105 (8.0%) in the post-partum period (2).

Suicide attempt in pregnancy was related to alcohol use, smoking during pregnancy and a history of miscarriage, and in the post-partum period to major depressive episode or recurrent depression and younger age.

Women who attempt suicide either in pregnancy or in the postnatal period could have different psychopathological and environmental profiles. Past obstetric history and addictive behaviours during pregnancy are essential elements to explore. In addition, depressive symptoms should be assessed in all women to treat major depression, as a means of preventing suicide attempt. Special attention to risk of suicide is needed during the perinatal period for women with severe mental illness.

For women suffering from an acute psychiatric disorder, or a history of mental illness, multi-disciplinary management should be implemented.

1. Oates M. Suicide: the leading cause of maternal death. Br J Psychiatry. 2003;183:279-81.

2. Gressier F et al. Risk factors for suicide attempt in pregnancy and the post-partum period in women with serious mental illnesses. J Psychiatr Res. 2017;84:284-291.

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