B. Penninx, Netherlands

Amsterdam UMC Department of Psychiatry

Moderator Of 1 Session

Educational
Date
Tue, 13.04.2021
Session Time
17:30 - 19:00
Room
Channel 5
Session Description
The Live Q&A of this session will take place in the Live Sessions auditorium. Please refer to the interactive programme for the exact time and channel.

The concept of “biological ageing” or “premature senescence” in relation to psychiatric diseases originally arose from the evidence that severe mental diseases (such as Major Depressive Disorder, Schizophrenia, Bipolar Disorder, or Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder) are associated with early mortality and with increased risk of developing certain senescence-associated medical comorbidities. Over the last years the research on the field has been stimulated by studies exploring the role of molecular underpinnings of senescence, i.e. molecular pathways at the peripheral and central level which are thought to have a causal role in, or to reflect, the ageing processes, in mental diseases. In the present symposium recent developments on the topic emerging from clinical and preclinical data will be presented and critically discussed.

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Pre-Recorded with Live Q&A

Presenter Of 4 Presentations

Workshop: Faster than Time: Serious Mental Illness and Accelerated Biological Aging (ID 198) No Topic Needed
Symposium: Disentangling the Role of Risk and Protective Factors in Developmental Trajectories Leading to Mental Disorders (ID 46) No Topic Needed

Live Q&A

Symposium: Disentangling the Role of Risk and Protective Factors in Developmental Trajectories Leading to Mental Disorders (ID 46) 36. Psychosurgery & Stimulation Methods (ECT, TMS, VNS, DBS)

S0146 - Chronicity in Depression: Predictable by Genetic, Neurobiological and Environmental Risk? Evidence from the 9-Year Longitudinal NESDA Cohort

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Pre-Recorded with Live Q&A, Section
Date
Tue, 13.04.2021
Session Time
08:00 - 09:30
Room
Channel 6
Lecture Time
08:17 - 08:34
Workshop: Faster than Time: Serious Mental Illness and Accelerated Biological Aging (ID 198) No Topic Needed

W0081 - Chronological and Biological Age: Why Relevant for Psychiatrists?

Session Icon
Pre-Recorded with Live Q&A
Date
Tue, 13.04.2021
Session Time
17:30 - 19:00
Room
Channel 5
Lecture Time
17:30 - 17:41

ABSTRACT

Abstract Body

Introduction: Depression is the mental disorder with the largest disease burden impact. That is due to its high prevalence, chronicty, early onset but also due to its impact on various aging-related somatic morbidities and mortality. This talk will describes to what extent depression characteristics are related to chronologial and biological aging patterns.

Methods: Data will be shown from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA, www.nesda.nl). In this study, a large cohort of over 3000 individuals (18-65 years), among which over 1200 with a DSM-based major depressive disorder (MDD), are now followed for 9 years. The association between depression characteristics and chronological and biological age will be described. Biological age was determined at various biological system-levels, including telomere length, epigenetics, transcriptomics, metabolomics and proteomics.

Results: Older persons with a current MDD do not differ in overall disease severity as compared to younger persons with a current MDD. However, older depressed persons do differ in the types of symptoms they experience (more neurovegetative, somatic symptoms and less mood symptoms) and in their chronic course (with twice more chronicity in the oldest depressed persons compare to the younges depressed persons). At all biological system-levels, there was evidence for more advaned biological aging among persons with depression. This was not differential across chronological age groups.

Discussion: Findings suggest that depression characteristics are linked to both chronological and biological age. It will be discussed what this could mean for clinical practice and intervention.

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