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Displaying One Session

PARALLEL SESSION
Date
Wed, 02.06.2021
Session Type
PARALLEL SESSION
Session Time
20:10 - 21:20
Room
Hall B
PARALLEL SESSION

Introduction

PARALLEL SESSION

Patient preferences for automatic insulin delivery

Abstract

Abstract Body

The current year has heralded a revolution in automated insulin delivery (AID) systems. There are currently 2 approved AIDs in the United States with anticipation of a 3rd approved system within the next few months, in addition to the Do-It-Yourself (DIY) systems. Shortly thereafter, we expect a number of other AID systems to become available globally. In order to ensure uptake these advanced diabetes technologies, it is important to understand patient preferences.
A number of studies have employed qualitative research methods to understand the desires of persons with diabetes of all ages, from childhood through older aged adults as well as the care providers of children and significant others of adults. It is important to keep in mind the need for realistic expectations of what current systems can and cannot do with respect to insulin automation. For example, there continues to be need for meal announcements with carbohydrate entry. Future advanced systems may mitigate this requirement.
At this time, it remains important to understand patient preferences with regard to type of device (e.g., on-body, pod like device vs. tubed insulin pump that can be removed as needed during wear). In addition, use of continuous glucose monitors (CGM) remains critical in such systems; therefore, preferences with regard to CGM must be also considered. It is also important to understand the various controllers and where such controllers reside (e.g. in pump, a handheld device) that implement the AID algorithm. This session will include review of various studies reporting patient preferences.
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PARALLEL SESSION

Automated Insulin Delivery—Best practices for onboarding and follow-up

Abstract

Abstract Body

An increasing number of Automated Insulin Delivery (AID) devices are available for commercial use for persons with diabetes. Typically, industry trainers are responsible for onboarding users to the new technology, and there is no universal clinical follow-up in the first few months of use. Ideal onboarding to AID systems should include a) thorough pre-AID education on general diabetes self-management, carbohydrate counting, insulin pump and continuous glucose monitoring basics, and expectations for AID systems b) Actual device training via face-to-face or teleconference based training, and c) clinical follow-up with diabetes professionals in the first 2-6 weeks of use for device optimization, troubleshooting, and reinforcing expectations . Clinical centers should consider ways to implement pre-AID education and post-AID clinical follow up for new AID device users to mitigate the risk of potential device discontinuation or unsafe practices.

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PARALLEL SESSION

Update on Harvard's algorithms and clinical studies

PARALLEL SESSION

Live Q&A

Date
Wed, 02.06.2021
Lecture Time
21:12 - 21:20