American medical center
Pediatric infectious diseases
Dr Tinsae Alemayehu is a pediatric infectious diseases specialist, medical educator and researcher based in Ethiopia. He is affiliated to the American medical center and also as an adjunct assistant professor to the St. Paul's hospital millennium medical college, Addis Ababa. He is also the current vice president of the African society of pediatric infectious diseases (AfSPID). Dr Tinsae has published 35 articles in peer-reviewed journals. His research interests are antimicrobial resistance and stewardship practices relevant to childhood infections in low resource settings. He has recently co-authored the pan-African antimicrobial treatment guidelines for common infections and syndromes in pediatric patients prepared by the Africa CDC and Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics and Policy. He co-directs the Addis Ababa-McGill University partnership for infectious diseases - a research group which thrives to promote research and training in Infectious and Tropical Diseases and in particular, antimicrobial stewardship. He's also member of the editorial team of the PLoS Global Health journal. Dr Tinsae also has experience in national outbreak control efforts in his home country including authoring national management guidelines for syndromes like pediatric COVID, Chikungunya, Dengue, viral hepatitis etc.

Moderator Of 1 Session

Session Type
Society Symposium
Date
Tue, 22.02.2022
Session Time
01:45 PM - 02:45 PM
Room
Sala C
Session Description
Symposium organized by the African Society for Paediatric Infectious Diseases (AfSPID)
Session Icon
Pre-Recorded with Live Q&A

Presenter Of 1 Presentation

PRESCRIPTION DAYS OFFERED FOR CHILDHOOD INFECTIONS BY RESIDENTS AND PEDIATRICIANS IN ETHIOPIA VARY FROM INTERNATIONALLY RECOGNIZED GUIDELINES: INDIFFERENCE PROMOTES SUB-OPTIMAL PATIENT OUTCOMES AND ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE

Session Type
Oral Presentations
Date
Wed, 23.02.2022
Session Time
11:15 AM - 12:25 PM
Room
Sala A
Session Icon
Pre-Recorded with Live Q&A
Lecture Time
11:35 AM - 11:45 AM

Abstract

Background

Unregulated antimicrobial use, lack of clinical microbiology laboratories and trained personnel are driving antimicrobial resistance in developing countries. .

Aims

The objective of the study was to compare antimicrobial prescription days recommended by pediatric residents and pediatricians in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia with guidelines published by internationally recognized bodies.

Methods

This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted from February - July, 2020. Data on recommendations on length of antimicrobial prescription were collected from pediatricians and pediatric residents in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Responses were summarized using descriptive quantitative analysis and their conformity to recommendations of internationally recognized guidelines was evaluated. Differences between sub-groups was determined by the Mann-Whitney U test. Analyses were done using Statistical package for the social sciences (SPSS) version 20.0 and significant differences ascertained at p-value < 0.05.

Results

A total of 88 respondents participated in the stud. Many respondents suggested prescription days exceeding recommendations for common pediatric infections; notably for conjunctivitis, cystitis, cellulitis and lower respiratory infections. Antimicrobial durations often came short of standard recommendations for tonsillopharyngitis, amebiasis and pyomyositis. Pediatricians favored less prescription days for endocarditis, hospital acquired pneumonia, cystitis and conjunctivitis. Inter-group differences were significant when prescribing for meningococcal meningitis, otitis media, Candida central line infections and non-gonococcal septic arthritis. Overall, respondents suggested 11,828.6 prescription days exceeding guideline recommendations.

Conclusions

Prescription days offered by pediatric residents and pediatricians practicing in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia differed from those recommended by guidelines for most childhood infections. Observance of evidence-based antimicrobial guidelines leads to favorable patient outcomes, fewer drug-related toxicities and prevention of antimicrobial resistance.

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