University of Glasgow
Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences
Dr Terry Quinn is Senior Clinical Lecturer and Honorary Consultant, University of Glasgow, UK. Terry has a broad research portfolio. Research interests include trial methodology, functional/cognitive assessment and evidence synthesis. He has published over 150 papers with recent titles in BMJ, JAMA and NEJM. Terry has various editorial board positions, including coordinating editor of the Cochrane Dementia Group. He chairs the stroke psychology SIG of the World Federation of Neuropsychology and is Scotland Lead for Ageing Research. He provides expertise on stroke and dementia to the Scottish Government. Within University of Glasgow, Terry is vice chair of ethics and coordinates clinical academic training. He combines his research with teaching and clinical commitments. Email: terry.quinn@glasgow.ac.uk Twitter: @DrTerryQuinn URL: http://www.gla.ac.uk/researchinstitutes/icams/staff/terryquinn/

Moderator Of 1 Session

Session Type
Main Theme Symposium
Date
29.10.2021, Friday
Session Time
08:00 - 09:30
Room
MAIN THEME A
Session Icon
Live Session

Presenter Of 1 Presentation

Post-stroke Delirium

Session Type
Main Theme Symposium
Date
29.10.2021, Friday
Session Time
08:00 - 09:30
Room
MAIN THEME A
Lecture Time
08:00 - 08:20

Abstract

Abstract Body

Delirium is a neuropsychiatric condition that is commonly seen in the context of acute illness. The syndrome can present in various ways but is generally characterised by an acute change in cognitive state with predominant attentional deficits. Recent studies have suggested that delirium occurs in around one in four patients during their time in an acute stroke unit. This number may be an under-estimate as delirium can be easily missed in a person with severe stroke who is medically unwell. The importance of recognising delirium is because of its association with poor outcomes. Stroke associated with delirium is more likely to result in death, institutionalisation and future dementia.

Despite its prevalence and importance, delirium has received less attention in research and guidelines than other post-stroke complications. Thankfully this situation is now changing and important delirium in stroke research is improving our understanding and management of the syndrome. In this plenary session, Dr Terry Quinn (University of Glasgow, UK) will consider the epidemiology of delirium in stroke, then discuss the assessment and management. He will draw upon the most recent research describing delirium in stroke and the evidence base that informs delirium care in other critical illness conditions. Throughout his talk he will emphasise that delirium is an important consideration for anyone working in stroke, that good quality delirium management can be delivered as part of standard stroke unit care and he will highlight the importance of delirium prevention.

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