University of Washington School of Medicine
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine

Author Of 2 Presentations

Disease Modifying Therapies – Risk Management Poster Presentation

LB1162 - Rapid transfer of knowledge for multiple sclerosis clinical care during COVID-19: ECHO MS (ID 1423)

Speakers
Presentation Number
LB1162
Presentation Topic
Disease Modifying Therapies – Risk Management

Abstract

Background

Healthcare providers caring for people with multiple sclerosis (MS) have had significant concerns about the intersection of MS and COVID-19. As a result, there has been an urgency to understand and share information about how to best provide MS clinical care during COVID-19. The Project ECHO model is well-suited for this challenge, as it provides a uniquely efficient and effective approach to sharing information in real-time using real cases.

Objectives

We report on the translation of the Project ECHO model for the rapid sharing of knowledge among MS clinical providers during COVID-19.

Methods

The ECHO MS COVID-19 Response Clinic was a videoconference-based education and case consultation program offered to providers in the U.S. who care for individuals with MS. The Response Clinic was offered as four sessions, each delivered by three regional hubs. Data were collected on participation and the self-reported impact of the program.

Results

A total of 132 unique providers participated in the Response Clinic, which consisted of 11 didactic modules and 43 case consultations. Participant providers overwhelmingly indicated that the program improved their knowledge, attitude, and skills for providing healthcare for people with MS during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Conclusions

The Project ECHO model was successfully adapted to serve the needs of the MS community during COVID-19, suggesting the program could be continued or could be expanded to other disease areas for a similar purpose. More research is needed to objectively measure the impact of the program on patient outcomes.

Collapse
Symptom Management Poster Presentation

P1089 - Depressive Symptoms and Suicidal Ideation in Progressive Multiple Sclerosis Compared to Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis (ID 1492)

Speakers
Presentation Number
P1089
Presentation Topic
Symptom Management

Abstract

Background

Depression is one of the most common and impactful symptoms experienced by people with multiple sclerosis (MS). Most participants in prior studies of depression in MS had relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS), the most common MS subtype. Consequently, little is known about whether persons with progressive forms of MS have unique rehabilitation needs, such as higher risk for depression or suicidal ideation (SI), compared to persons with RRMS.

Objectives

To (1) describe depressive symptom severity and SI in persons with progressive MS; (2) compare depressive symptom severity and SI in persons with progressive MS and persons with RRMS; and (3) identify common and unique risk factors for greater depressive symptom severity and SI risk in persons with progressive MS compared to individuals with RRMS.

Methods

Adults with MS (N = 573) completed an observational survey study on quality of life in people with physical disabilities, including but not limited to MS. The dependent variables were depression symptoms and any SI as measured by the Patient Health Questionnaire-9. Comparisons between groups used t-test and chi-square analyses, and risk factors were tested by examining the interaction of MS subtype (progressive MS and RRMS) and each risk factor in multiple regression models with bootstrapping. Risk factors for greater depression severity and SI risk included age, race, gender, education level, marital status, employment status, household income, age at MS diagnosis, disease duration, disability level, problems with speech and/or swallowing, and current smoking status.

Results

Persons with progressive MS did not differ from persons with RRMS in levels of depressive symptoms or SI. Both groups reported mild depression symptoms and approximately 10% endorsed SI. Common risk factors for greater depressive symptom severity were younger age, greater disability, greater speech and swallowing problems, and lower household income (p’s<.05). Common risk factors for SI were shorter disease duration, greater disability, and greater speech and swallowing problems (p’s<.05). For persons with progressive MS, shorter disease duration and being non-White were associated with greater depressive symptom severity, and being employed was associated with SI risk (p’s<.05).

Conclusions

In this sample, there were no group differences between persons with progressive MS and persons with RRMS in depressive symptom severity and SI, though shorter disease duration, identifying as a racial minority, and being employed were unique risk factors for depression outcomes in persons with progressive MS. Consistent with current treatment guidelines for MS care, these findings underscore the importance of screening for and treating depressive disorders in all persons with MS, with particular attention to the factors that place some individuals with progressive MS at greater risk for both depression and SI, whether common or unique to their course.

Collapse

Presenter Of 1 Presentation

Disease Modifying Therapies – Risk Management Poster Presentation

LB1162 - Rapid transfer of knowledge for multiple sclerosis clinical care during COVID-19: ECHO MS (ID 1423)

Speakers
Presentation Number
LB1162
Presentation Topic
Disease Modifying Therapies – Risk Management

Abstract

Background

Healthcare providers caring for people with multiple sclerosis (MS) have had significant concerns about the intersection of MS and COVID-19. As a result, there has been an urgency to understand and share information about how to best provide MS clinical care during COVID-19. The Project ECHO model is well-suited for this challenge, as it provides a uniquely efficient and effective approach to sharing information in real-time using real cases.

Objectives

We report on the translation of the Project ECHO model for the rapid sharing of knowledge among MS clinical providers during COVID-19.

Methods

The ECHO MS COVID-19 Response Clinic was a videoconference-based education and case consultation program offered to providers in the U.S. who care for individuals with MS. The Response Clinic was offered as four sessions, each delivered by three regional hubs. Data were collected on participation and the self-reported impact of the program.

Results

A total of 132 unique providers participated in the Response Clinic, which consisted of 11 didactic modules and 43 case consultations. Participant providers overwhelmingly indicated that the program improved their knowledge, attitude, and skills for providing healthcare for people with MS during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Conclusions

The Project ECHO model was successfully adapted to serve the needs of the MS community during COVID-19, suggesting the program could be continued or could be expanded to other disease areas for a similar purpose. More research is needed to objectively measure the impact of the program on patient outcomes.

Collapse