University of Washington
Strategic Analysis, Research & Training (START) Center
Mathias Lalika is an MPH candidate in the Department of Global Health at the University of Washington. He is also currently working as a Research Assistant at the Strategic Analysis, Research & Training (START) Center, where he provides analytic support to help inform the decisions of the local and global health organizations such as the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the World Health Organization, and others. He was trained as a physician, and he has more than six years of experience in academic research. His interests include infectious diseases, chronic diseases, improving maternal and child health outcomes, and addressing health disparities.

Presenter Of 1 Presentation

O005 - PNEUMOCOCCAL SEROTYPE DIFFERENCES IN INVASIVE DISEASE ISOLATES OBTAINED FROM CHILDREN LESS THAN 5 YEARS OF AGE IN GAVI AND NON-GAVI COUNTRIES (ID 127)

Session Type
Parallel Session
Date
Mon, 20.06.2022
Session Time
15:20 - 16:35
Room
Grand Ballroom Centre
Lecture Time
16:05 - 16:15

Abstract

Background

Serotypes causing invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in children may vary globally and over time.

Methods

In a follow-up to our previous literature review of publications from 2010 to 2018, we searched PubMed, Embase, and performed a backward citation search to identify relevant articles for serotypes causing IPD published between May 2018 and October 2021. Publications with at least 20 serotype isolates were included. We summarized the overall distribution of existing PCV and non-PCV serotypes and analyzed the difference in serotype distribution between Gavi and non-Gavi countries.

Results

Thirty-eight articles met our inclusion criteria and yielded 4,815 serotypes, collected between 2010 and 2019. The ten most common serotypes were 19A, 14, 19F, 6B, 23F, 1, 6A, 15, 24F, and 3—accounting for nearly 60 percent of all serotypes. The five most common non-PCV types were 15, 24F, 23A, 15A, and 12F. Sixty-four percent of isolates (n = 3,105) were from non-Gavi countries; most common serotypes were 19A, 14, 19F, 6B, 15, 24F, and 23F. Most common serotypes (n = 1,740) from Gavi countries were 14, 19F, 1, 6B, 19A, and 23F. Most differences between non-Gavi and Gavi countries were seen in non-PCV serotypes, with serotypes 15/15A, 24F, 23A, and 12F seen frequently in non-Gavi countries and serotypes 2, 35B, and 15B in Gavi countries.

Conclusions

IPD serotype data in children are limited, with most originating from non-Gavi countries. There are differences in serotype distribution between Gavi and non-Gavi countries that may be important to inform next generation vaccines.

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