Melanie Baxter, Canada

University of Manitoba Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases

Poster Author Of 2 e-Posters

Online Abstracts Clinical Sciences - Disease Burden in Infants, Children/Youth, and Adults B2 Disease Burden in Infants, Children/Youth, and Adults
Online Abstracts Vaccines - Impact of Vaccine programs and Serotype Replacement C2 Impact of Vaccine programs and Serotype Replacement

Author Of 2 Presentations

ANTIMICROBIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY PATTERNS OF COMMON INVASIVE STREPTOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE SEROTYPES IN CANADA: THE SAVE STUDY (ID 46)

Abstract

Background

The annual SAVE study was initiated in Canada in 2011 after PCV-13 was introduced. The study aims to detect antimicrobial susceptibility changes, overall and by serotype, in S. pneumoniae (SPN).

Methods

In collaboration between CARA, selected public health laboratories and PHAC-NML, the SAVE study collected 11044 invasive isolates of SPN from 2011 to 2018. Serotyping was performed using the Quellung reaction. Susceptibility testing was performed using CLSI methods.

Results

In 2018, 1878 SPN were collected as part of the SAVE study. The susceptibility results of the 10 most common serotypes in 2018 are shown below.

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MDR was noted in 24 serotypes with the highest rates in 14 (60%), 15A (55.8%), 23F (50%), 6A/B (30/33.3%) and 19A (25%). Of the 120 MDR isolates identified in 2018, the most commonly observed MDR pattern was resistance to CLR, clindamycin, chloramphenicol and DOX (n=34). The rate of MDR SPN in 2018 was 6.5%, representing a decrease from the study high of 8.5% in 2011 but an increase from the 2016 rate of 3.9%.

Conclusions

Ongoing changes in the epidemiology and susceptibility patterns in SPN in Canada were observed.

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PCV15 AND PPSV23 COVERAGE OF INVASIVE AND RESPIRATORY TRACT ISOLATES OF STREPTOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE: CANWARD 2007-2018 (ID 346)

Abstract

Background

The objective of this study was to compare the proportion of invasive and respiratory tract isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae (SPN), including multidrug/extensive-drug resistant (MDR/XDR) strains, that demonstrated PCV15/PPSV23 serotypes in Canada from 2007-2018.

Methods

The CANWARD study collected 2821 SPN isolates from 2007-2018 (986 invasive, 1835 respiratory). Serotyping was performed by the Quellung reaction. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using CLSI methods. MDR/XDR was defined as resistance to ³3/³5 antimicrobial classes, respectively.

Results

Overall, the proportion of blood isolates demonstrating a PCV15/PPSV23 serotype was significantly higher than respiratory strains (55.4/76.7% vs 39.5/55.3%, P<0.0001). By age group, with the exception of the <2-year category, the proportion of blood isolates demonstrating a PCV15/PPSV23 serotype was significantly higher than respiratory strains (P</=0.0046). Similar results were noted by gender (P<0.0001) and region (P</=0.0002), with the exception of Eastern Canada. There was no significant difference in the proportion of MDR blood (64.4/71.1%) and respiratory (54.3/56.1%) isolates representing PCV15/PPSV23 serotypes, respectively. All XDR isolates were serotypes contained in PCV15/PPSV23, and there was no significant difference in proportion between blood (92.9%) and respiratory (88.9%) isolates.

Conclusions

In general, the proportion of blood isolates demonstrating a PCV15/PPSV23 serotype in Canada was significantly higher than that of respiratory isolates.

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