Derek Weycker, United States of America

Policy Analysis Inc. (PAI) Partner

Poster Author Of 2 e-Posters

Online Abstracts Population Sciences - Epidemiology, Economics, and Mathematical Modelling D1 Epidemiology, Economics, and Mathematical Modelling
Online Abstracts Population Sciences - Epidemiology, Economics, and Mathematical Modelling D1 Epidemiology, Economics, and Mathematical Modelling

Author Of 2 Presentations

ATTRIBUTABLE COST OF ADULT HOSPITALIZED PNEUMONIA BEYOND THE ACUTE PHASE (ID 377)

Abstract

Background

While much is known about the cost of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) during the acute phase, little is known about the potential attributable cost of CAP thereafter.

Methods

A retrospective matched-cohort design and data from a US private healthcare claims repository were employed. In each month of accrual (01/2013 – 07/2017), adults who were hospitalized for CAP in that month (“CAP patients”) were matched (1:1, without replacement) on demographic and clinical profiles to adults who did not develop CAP in that month (“comparison patients”). All-cause healthcare utilization and expenditures (2018 US$) were tallied during the acute phase (i.e., from date of CAP hospitalization through 30 days post-discharge) as well as from the end of the acute phase to the end of the three-year follow-up period.

Results

Expenditures during the acute phase of the CAP hospitalization averaged $32,064 (vs. $1,556 for comparison patients). By the end of the 3-year follow-up period, all-cause expenditures averaged $124,035 for CAP patients versus $63,652 for comparison patients, and thus attributable costs totaled $60,383.figure.jpg

Conclusions

Our findings provide additional evidence that the cost of CAP requiring hospitalization is high, and that the impact of CAP extends beyond the expected time for resolution of acute inflammatory signs.

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COST-EFFECTIVENESS OF PCV13 IN IMMUNOCOMPETENT US ADULTS AGED 65 YEARS: IMPORTANCE OF VACCINE EFFECTIVENESS AGAINST SEROTYPE 3 (ID 220)

Abstract

Background

Accumulating—albeit limited—evidence indicates that PCV13 is effective against serotype 3 (ST3), which causes a disproportionate share of pneumococcal disease in US adults. Estimates of protection employed in economic evaluations have varied widely; we thus examined the importance of vaccine effectiveness (VE) against ST3 in determining the cost-effectiveness of PCV13.

Methods

A probabilistic cohort model depicting risks and costs of pneumococcal disease was employed to evaluate the cost per QALY gained with PCV13->PPSV23 versus PPSV23 alone in immunocompetent US adults aged 65 years under alternative assumptions regarding VE-PCV13 versus ST3. VE-PCV13 (excl. ST3) was based on data from the Community-Acquired Pneumonia Immunization Trial in Adults (CAPiTA); VE-PPSV23 against IPD was based on published literature, and against CAP, was zero.

Results

Cost per QALY gained with PCV13->PPSV23 (vs. PPSV23) ranged from $449,304 to $184,807 when varying VE-PCV13 versus ST3 from 0% to 125% of point-estimates from published literature.figure.jpg

Conclusions

Cost-effectiveness of PCV13 in immunocompetent US adults aged 65 years varies considerably under alternative assumptions regarding VE-PCV13 versus ST3. When assuming a reasonable value for VE-PCV13 versus ST3, results suggest that PCV13 provides acceptable value for money in this patient population.

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