Robert F Breiman, United States of America

Emory University Emory Global Health Institute

Author Of 5 Presentations

GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION STUDY OF COLONISING NASOPHARYNGEAL PNEUMOCOCCI OBTAINED FROM CHILDREN IN NEPAL TO IDENTIFY GENES ASSOCIATED WITH PNEUMONIA. (ID 729)

Abstract

Background

Identifying the molecular characteristics of pneumococci associated with disease may inform development of new clinical interventions. We aimed to perform a bacterial genome-wide association study to identify pneumococcal genes associated with carriage among children with pneumonia.

Methods

DNA from nasopharyngeal pneumococcal isolates obtained from Nepalese children admitted to hospital with pneumonia (cases) and healthy community-based children (controls), underwent whole-genome-sequencing on the Wellcome Sanger Institutes core sequencing pipeline. The association of variants from sequences mapped against the S. pneumoniae ATCC700669 genome, with cluster of orthologous groups using a fixed effects model, was performed using a python based sequence element enrichment analysis.

Results

245 case and 597 control isolates were sequenced. 405461 variants were identified and 31708 tested after filtering. 20 variants from colonising bacteria had a strong association (p<10-8) with pneumonia. 18/20 of these variants were located within the lacE2 gene. The variant with the strongest association, presence of an A allele at position 1066739, was identified in 240/597 (40%) of controls and 150/245 (61%) of cases (p=10-10).

Conclusions

In this study in Nepal the pneumococcal gene lacE2 was associated with colonisation in children with pneumonia. Studies examining the role of lacE2 in the pathogenesis of pneumococcal pneumonia are needed.

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PCV10 IMPACT ON PNEUMOCOCCAL LINEAGES ISOLATED FROM HEALTHY NEPALESE CHILDREN. (ID 736)

Abstract

Background

The 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV10) was introduced into the Nepalese infant immunisation schedule in August 2015. We aimed to examine how PCV10 introduction in affected pneumococcal lineages.

Methods

DNA from randomly selected nasopharyngeal pneumococcal isolates of healthy community-based Nepalese children in the Kathmandu valley pre- (2009-2014) and post-PCV10 (2017-2018) introduction, underwent whole-genome-sequencing on the Wellcome Sanger Institutes core sequencing pipeline. Isolates were clustered into lineages based on shared sequence and gene content using Population Partitioning Using Nucleotide K-mers (PopPUNK) software.

Results

313 and 284 pre- and post-PCV10 isolates were sequenced. There was a significant reduction in the proportion of PCV10 serotypes when comparing pre 73/313 (23.3%) with post 37/284 (13%) PCV10 samples (p=0.0014). Overall 122 distinct lineages were identified, 98 pre- and 74 post-PCV10. Simpson's index of diversity for the lineages was 0.992 and 0.987 pre- and post-PCV10 respectively. Within the 3 largest PCV10 serotype lineages there were no examples of non-PCV10 serotype isolates pre-vaccination, whereas all 3 lineages contained non-PCV10 serotypes post-vaccination.

Conclusions

PCV10 serotype prevalence significantly declined following PCV10 introduction. However, strain diversity remained high post-PCV10 and there is evidence suggestive of vaccine escape via capsular-switching among lineages possessing predominantly vaccine-covered capsules prior to PCV10 introduction.

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ACQUISITION AND CLEARANCE OF PNEUMOCOCCAL SEROTYPES IN NATURALLY-COLONISED PCV-EXPOSED GAMBIAN INFANTS (ID 990)

Abstract

Background

Pneumococcal carriage influences population-wide strain dynamics, but limited data exist on serotype-specific temporal carriage patterns among PCV-vaccinated West African infants.

Methods

Pneumococcus was cultured from nasopharyngeal swabs (n=1, 595) collected from 102 PCV7-exposed infants followed up from birth to 12 months. Serotyping was performed by whole genome sequencing and sweep-latex agglutination. Parametric survival models with constant hazard rates were fitted to estimate carriage dynamics (duration, clearance and acquisition).

Results

The infants were naturally colonised with 60 pneumococcal serotypes with a mean of 7 (range:2-11) serotypes per infant. Carriage dynamics estimates for serotypes 5, 7F, 39, 9A, and 12F are provided here for the first time in infants. There was no correlation between time to first acquisition and carriage duration (ρ=0.06, P=0.709). Serotype prevalence showed a weak correlation with initial acquisition (ρ=0.07, P=0.706), carriage duration (ρ=0.219, P=0.194), and reacquisition times (ρ=0.09, P=0.730). Onset of initial acquisition was longer than the time taken to reacquire serotypes (median: 136.23 vs 26.15 days, P=7.63×10-6). Overall, serotype-specific carriage durations after initial acquisition and reacquisition were significantly different (P=0.020), varying by serotype.

carriage_duration.png

Conclusions

Pneumococcal carriage dynamics among Gambian infants are complex and highly variable by serotype which may have important implications for transmission and invasive disease.

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GENOMIC SURVEILLANCE OF INVASIVE STREPTOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE ISOLATES (SPN) IN BRAZIL, PERIODS PRE- (2008-2009) AND POST-PCV10 (2012-2013) INTRODUCTION (ID 464)

Abstract

Background

In 2010, Brazil introduced PCV10 into the national children’s immunization program. This study describes the genomic population structure of invasive SPN before and after PCV10 introduction.

Methods

As part of Global Pneumococcal Sequencing (GPS) project, 466 (pre-PCV10:n=232, post-PCV10:n=234; <5-year-olds:n=310, ≥5-year-olds:n=156) invasive SPN collected through national laboratory surveillance were whole-genome sequenced.

Results

The study identified 65 GPS clusters (GPSCs): 49 (88%) GPS previously described and 16 (12%) were Brazilian clusters. 36 GPSCs (55%) were non-PCV10 lineages, 11 (17%) PCV10/non-PCV10 and 18 (28%) PCV10. In both periods, the most frequent lineage was GPSC6/CC156/PMEN3/14-9V. Post-vaccine non-PCV10 lineages GPSC16/CC66/9N-15A, GPSC12/CC180/PMEN3/3 and GPSC32/CC218/PMEN24/12F increased; in <5-year-olds, GPSC1/CC320/DLV-PMEN14/19A, GPSC47/CC386/DLV-PMEN20/6C and GPSC51/CC458/3; and ≥5-year-olds GPSC3/CC53/PMEN33/8 were predominant (Figure-1).

SPN penicillin nonsusceptibility was predicted in 40%; 127 PBP combinations were identified (51 predicted MIC≥0.125mg/L); cotrimoxazole (folA+folP alterations), macrolide (mef/ermB/ermB+mef) and tetracycline (tetM/tetO/tetS/M) resistance were predicted in 46%, 13% and 21% SPN, respectively. In <5-year-olds, a penicillin (p=0.0169) and cotrimoxazole (p<0.0001) resistance reduction and an increase in tetracycline (p=0.019) were observed. Post-PCV10, PBP15-12-18(2mg/L) was frequent in lineage GPSC6/CC156/PMEN3/14-9V; among <5-year-olds the PBP13-11-16(4mg/L) in GPSC1/CC320/DLV-PMEN14/19A and PBP2-53-77(0.125mg/L) in GPSC47/ST386/DLV-PMEN20/6C were predominant.

isppd-12 (brazil figure 1 v9).jpg

Conclusions

Post-PCV10, important non-PCV10 lineages, GPSC1/CC320/DLV-PMEN14/19A and GPSC47/ST386/DLV-PMEN20/6C associated with multidrug resistance and GPSC12/CC180/PMEN31/3, GPSC3/CC53/PMEN33/8 and GPSC32/CC218/PMEN24/12F were identified in Brazil.

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