K. Zaslav (New York, US)

Lenox Hill Orthopedic Institute Center for Regenerative Orthopaedic Medicine
Ken Zaslav graduated with a BA in Biology from SUNY Binghamton/Harpur College from which he has has been awarded The Distiguished Alumnis Award in 2016 and received his medical degree from The Albert Einstein College of Medicine. He completed his Orthopedic Surgery Residency at Stony Brook University followed by a fellowship in Sports Medicine at New York University Medical Center in New York City. He has been a Clinical Professor of Orthopedic Surgery at Virginia Commonwealth University; and a partner for 30 years at Ortho Virginia and has published and lectured worldwide on sports medicine; cartilage repair; Orthobiologics and shoulder surgery. He has recently relocated to New York City and joined the faculty of Lenox Hill Orthopedic Sports Medicine Department where he is The Director of the New Center for Regenerative Orthopedic Medicine at Northwell Lenox Hill. He has been a fellow of the International Cartilage Repair and Joint Preservation Society (ICRS) based in Zurich since 1999 and has served on its Executive Committee in multiple positions including as its President. Dr. Zaslav is a fellow of The American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons; a member of the American Orthopedic Society of Sports Medicine Board of Councilors and the Arthroscopy Association of North America. He is a founding member of The Biologic Association and is currently its Secretary General. He has been an invited speaker at The FDA and a visiting Professor at Universities in Mexico; Venezuela; China and Japan plus serves on the Scientific Advisory Boards of several biotech companies in the United States and Israel. Dr. Zaslav was the Company Physician for Richmond Ballet for over 28 years as well as the past Chairman of its Board of Trustees and has been recently awarded The Richmond Ballet Lifetime Achievement Award for his contribution to Dance.

Presenter Of 5 Presentations

Extended Abstract (for invited Faculty only) Please select your topic

1.3.5 - Industry Relations - The Surgeon Perspective

Presentation Topic
Please select your topic
Date
12.04.2022
Lecture Time
12:23 - 12:28
Room
Bellevue
Session Type
Special Session
Extended Abstract (for invited Faculty only) Please select your topic

8.1.3 - Surgical Treatment

Presentation Topic
Please select your topic
Date
13.04.2022
Lecture Time
11:15 - 11:30
Room
Potsdam 1
Session Type
Special Session
Extended Abstract (for invited Faculty only) Joint Specific Cartilage Repair

9.1.1 - The Science: Osteochondral Remodeling Using Aragonite-Based Implants

Presentation Topic
Joint Specific Cartilage Repair
Date
13.04.2022
Lecture Time
12:00 - 12:15
Room
Potsdam 1
Session Type
Industry Satellite Symposium
Podium Presentation Osteoarthritis

10.3.10 - A RCT of a Single, Intra-Articular Injection of Autologous Protein Solution(APS) in Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis (PROGRESS IV)

Presentation Topic
Osteoarthritis
Date
13.04.2022
Lecture Time
13:00 - 13:00
Room
Bellevue
Session Type
Free Papers
Disclosure
This study was sponsored by Zimmer Biomet. Jennifer Woodell-May is a paid employee of Zimmer Biomet.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to determine the safety and effectiveness of a single injection of nSTRIDE® APS for unilateral knee osteoarthritis (NCT02905240).

Methods and Materials

This study was conducted as an Investigational Device Exemption (IDE-17069) with the FDA. Subjects with knee OA Kellgren-Lawrence 2-4 (n=332) were randomized to receive a single intra-articular injection of APS or saline under ultrasound guidance. The primary endpoint was the change in WOMAC pain from baseline to 12-months post-injection. Secondary endpoints included functional status, knee stiffness, and quality of life. Injection safety and anatomical changes were evaluated by MRI and radiographs 12 months post-injection.

Results

APS treatment showed a significant improvement in WOMAC Pain compared to baseline (51.8±36.2% improvement [95% CI 46.0, 57.7]) 12 months after a single injection, however, no significant difference in treatment effect between APS and saline was observed. No statistical differences in adverse event reporting between groups occurred. There was significant improvement at 12 months from baseline in function, stiffness, VAS pain, and EQ-5D for both groups. No major changes in joint morphology were shown for either group, as assessed by x-ray and MRI. By 12-months post-injection, saline subjects took more rescue medication, restricted medication, and exited due to knee pain at almost twice the rate of APS subjects. A novel post hoc pain responder criteria was created that accounted for medication usage and study exit rate, which demonstrated a statistically significant difference in responder rates(p=0.0239)(Figure 1).

figure1.jpg

Conclusion

Treatment with a single, intra-articular injection of APS in subjects with knee osteoarthritis can be considered safe, and was found to reduce pain and improve function up to 12 months when compared to baseline. A novel responder criterion incorporating medication usage was developed that could be used in future studies as a method to help mitigate the high placebo response typically observed in knee OA studies.

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Poster Growth factors, PRP and Cytokines

P205 - Evaluating the Efficacy of Scaffold-Based Exosome Delivery Based on Changes in Exosome Activity

Presentation Topic
Growth factors, PRP and Cytokines
Date
13.04.2022
Lecture Time
09:30 - 09:30
Room
Exhibition Foyer
Session Name
7.3 - Poster Viewing / Coffee Break / Exhibition
Session Type
Poster Session
Disclosure
No Significant Commercial Relationship

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to compare the activities of fresh, lyophilized, and cultured mesenchymal stem cell-derived exosomes (MSC-exos) to evaluate the viability of scaffold-based exosome delivery for the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee joint.

Methods and Materials

MSC-exos were harvested from human adipose tissue stem cells and separated into three groups: the first was cultured at 37° C for one week, the second was lyophilized, and the third was snap-frozen. Cultured primary human articular chondrocytes were seeded onto a 24-well plate and exposed to human interleukin 1-beta (IL-1β) to stimulate OA conditions. The three exosome aliquots were selectively added to the wells and relative fold gene expression was obtained for the following genes: 1) ACAN, 2) COL2, 3) IL-1, 4) MMP-13, and 5) TNF-α.

Results

There was no significant difference in ACAN gene expression between the OA only group and all three exosome-treated groups. The addition of exosomes helped increase COL2 levels in all three exosome-treated groups when compared to the OA only group. In particular, the OA + lyophilized exosomes (p = 0.019) and OA + cultured exosomes (p < 0.001) groups displayed significant increases in COL2. The OA condition triggered significant gene expression of IL-1 and TNF-α in the OA only group, but these levels were significantly reduced in all three exosome treated groups (fresh: p = 0.012, p < 0.005; lyophilized: p = 0.012, p < 0.005; cultured: p = 0.012, p < 0.005). Lastly, there was a significant difference in relative fold gene expression of MMP-13 between the OA only group and all three exosome-treated groups (fresh: p = 0.001, lyophilized: p = 0.002, cultured: p = 0.003).

icrs abstract results.jpg

Conclusion

Our results indicate that scaffolds that require lyophilization and/or display prolonged degradation rates can be used as viable drug delivery vehicles for exosomes into the knee joint.

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