A. Mestriner (Sao Paulo, BR)

Presenter Of 2 Presentations

Podium Presentation Cartilage /Cell Transplantation

10.1.8 - Etiology of Cartilage Lesions Does Not Affect Clinical Outcomes of Patellofemoral Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation

Presentation Number
10.1.8
Presentation Topic
Cartilage /Cell Transplantation
Lecture Time
14:33 - 14:42
Session Type
Free Paper Session
Corresponding Author
Disclosure
Alexandre Mestriner, Company Vericel and JRF Otho, Grant Research Support, Andreas Gomoll, Company JRF Ortho, Consultant, Andreas Gomoll, Company Moximed, Inc., Consultant, Andreas Gomoll, Company NuTech, Consultant, Royalties for ReNu amniotic stem, Andr

Abstract

Purpose

Cartilage defects in the patellofemoral joint (PFJ) can be caused by either traumatic or non-traumatic/degenerative events to the PFJ. Yet, no previous study has evaluated the effect of cartilage defect etiology on clinical outcomes after autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) to the PFJ. The purpose of this study was therefore to determine the relationship between cartilage lesion etiology and clinical outcomes after ACI in the PFJ.

Methods and Materials

A retrospective review of all patients that underwent ACI in the PFJ by a single surgeon was performed. Patient factors, cartilage lesion etiology and morphology, and pre- and postoperative patient-reported outcomes measures (PROMs) were collected. Patients were stratified into three groups based on the etiology of PFJ cartilage lesions: patellar instability (group 1); non-traumatic lesions including chondromalacia, osteochondritis dissecans and degenerative defects (group 2); and post-traumatic lesions excluding patellar dislocations (group 3). A clinical comparison was established between groups based on PROMs and failure rates.

Results

Eighty patients that underwent ACI in the PFJ with a mean follow-up of 3.9 ±2.1 yearswere enrolled in this study. Patient’s mean age was 30.4 ± 9.4 years. Patients in group 1 were significantly younger (n = 26; 25.2 ±7.7 years) than group 2 (n = 31; 32.9 ±10.5 years) (p = 0.005) and group 3 (n = 23; 32.6 ± 7.6 years) (p = 0.008). Body mass index averaged 26.42 ± 4.5 kg/m2, with a significant difference between group 1 (24.7 ± 3.7 kg/m2) and group 3 (28.8 ± 4.3 kg/m2) (p = 0.006). Neither pre- or post-operative PROMs differed between the groups (p > 0.05). No difference was seen in success rates between the groups (96.2% vs. 83.9% vs. 91.3%, p = 0.301).

Conclusion

Cartilage lesion etiology does not influence clinical outcomes after ACI in the PFJ.

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Podium Presentation Cartilage /Cell Transplantation

10.1.10 - Trochlear Dysplasia Does Not Affect the Outcomes of Patellofemoral Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation

Presentation Number
10.1.10
Presentation Topic
Cartilage /Cell Transplantation
Lecture Time
14:51 - 15:00
Session Type
Free Paper Session
Corresponding Author
Disclosure
Alexandre Mestriner, Company Vericel and JRF Otho, Grant Research Support, Andreas Gomoll, Company JRF Ortho, Consultant, Andreas Gomoll, Company Moximed, Inc., Consultant, Andreas Gomoll, Company NuTech, Consultant, Royalties for ReNu amniotic stem, Andr

Abstract

Purpose

The influence of trochlear dysplasia on the clinical outcomes of autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) to the patellofemoral joint (PFJ) has not been studied yet. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of trochlear dysplasia on clinical outcomes after ACI for the treatment of large cartilage lesions in the PFJ with a follow-up range of 2 to 5.6 years.

Methods and Materials

A retrospective review of prospectively collected data of all patients that underwent ACI for focal cartilage defect repair in the PFJby a single surgeon was performed.Patient factors, lesion morphology, and pre- and postoperative patient-reported outcomes measures (PROMs) were collected, including the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), Lysholm, Tegner and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC). Two independent observers assessed preoperative imaging to determine the presence and grade of trochlear dysplasia according to Dejour and Lippacher classifications. Patients were stratified into two groups based on the presence or absence of trochlear dysplasia, and patients without trochlear dysplasia served as controls. Patients were matched 1:1 for sex, age, BMI, lesion size and location.

Results

Forty-six patients that underwent ACI in the PFJ with a mean follow-up of 3.7 ±1.9 yearswere enrolled in this study. Patient’s mean age was 30.1 ±8.8 years. Interobserver reliability (k) was 0.774 for the Dejour and 0.924 for the Lippacher classification (p < 0.001). PROMs at final follow-up did not differ between both groups (p > 0.05). No difference was seen regarding success rates between both groups (95.7% vs. 95.7%, p > 0.999). No difference in clinical outcome was seen between patients with high-grade dysplasia and patients without dysplasia (p > 0.05).

Conclusion

ACI in the PFJ provides favorable outcomes in patients with trochlear dysplasia, which are in fact comparable to those of matched patients with normal trochlear anatomy.

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