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Selected 17 Sessions
Session Type
  • Special interest event
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11.07.2020, Saturday 15:00 - 16:30 Hall A Special interest event
Date
11.07.2020, Saturday
Session Time
15:00 - 16:30
Session Description
Neuroscientists use a broad range of organisms (from worms, flies and zebrafish to rodents and primates, and now to organoids) to study brain function and behavior. This Brain Debate aims at illustrating why different scientists study different systems and what can be achieved with different approaches. Animal preparations are frequently presented as ‘model organisms’. Does this suggest that the ultimate goal of animal work should be to understand and treat the human brain? Translating animal brain research to clinical implications is certainly a key goal of a large part of the research carried out. The neuroscientific community may, however, have diverse views on the purpose of studying many systems, on what can be achieved with different brain ‘models’, and on what the ultimate goals of each research field and envisioned applications may be. In this Brain Debate, we will discuss the merits of focused and comparative approaches and reflect on our scientific mission and on our vision for the field.
Speakers and discussants:
Gilles Laurent - Frankfurt, Germany
Emre Yaksi - Trondheim, Norway
Christian Lüscher - Geneva, Switzerland
Guo-li Ming - Pennsylvania, USA
Angela Roberts - Cambridge, UK
Peter Dayan - Tübingen, Germany
Tracy Bale - Maryland, USA
Irene Tracey - Oxford, UK
Moderator:
Trevor Robbins - Cambridge, UK
12.07.2020, Sunday 09:30 - 10:30 Hall A Special interest event
Date
12.07.2020, Sunday
Session Time
09:30 - 10:30
Session Description
The most important skill a scientist needs, after the research and technical skills needed to execute a study, is the ability to report their scientific endeavours in the written form. Indeed, there is no point in conducting research if one cannot articulate new scientific knowledge. The aim of this workshop, which will be presented by the editors of four international, society-owned neuroscience journals, to discuss what happens to a paper once the ‘submit’ button is pressed. We will discuss what editors consider when deciding whether to review a paper, what we expect from reviewers, what we expect in a good paper, how journals expect data to be represented and statistical analyses reported and issues around journal metrics. Each of the editors will be attending the FENS forum and will be available for discussion about current papers, prospective papers and special issues. Additional aims are: • to stress the importance of Society-owned journals, • to show that we as editors are approachable and want to publish good science • to show that we are scientists ourselves who have gone through the submission process many times and • to dispel the idea of conflict between the author and Editors/reviewers
12.07.2020, Sunday 09:30 - 10:30 Hall B Special interest event
Date
12.07.2020, Sunday
Session Time
09:30 - 10:30
Session Description
"Today I wouldn't get an academic job. It's as simple as that. I don't think I would be regarded as productive enough." Peter Higgs, Nobel prize winner. The preference for dramatic, novel and positive findings over incremental, reproduced or negative findings within a ‘publish or perish’ culture is jeopardising the reproducibility, replicability, and reliability of neuroscience research. While this issue has been recognised for some time, and is currently being addressed by many research councils, institutes and journals who are adopting credible initiatives, there is still a perceived - or in many cases actual - pressure on neuroscientists to publish ‘high-impact’ articles (and in high numbers). In this special event, we will hear about credibility initiatives that have the potential to increase the reproducibility, replicability, and reliability neuroscience research, which will not only benefit scientific progress in the long-run, but also address a major cause for the poor mental health of research scientists. Following this event, the speakers will be available to answer your questions in an informal setting within the Forum career and training area from 14:30-15:30.
Session
12.07.2020, Sunday 09:30 - 10:30 Hall C Special interest event
Date
12.07.2020, Sunday
Session Time
09:30 - 10:30
Session Description
The principles of replacement, refinement and reduction - the “Three Rs” put forward by the European Directive on the protection of animals used for scientific purposes - continue to shape scientific research across the EU and beyond. In this context, the search for alternatives to animal models increasingly influences the development of research projects. At the same time, the importance of employing the correct model - be that animal or otherwise - remains key to the reliability, and indeed utility, of any results. The discussion will cover situations involving a shift from high to low complexity models, from animal models to experiments in humans, and animal to in vitro models. Speakers who have made such changes will discuss their reasons for doing so, the challenges encountered and the impact on their working methods.
Session
12.07.2020, Sunday 09:30 - 10:30 Hall D Special interest event
Date
12.07.2020, Sunday
Session Time
09:30 - 10:30
Session Description
After a short introduction by Prof. Carmen Sandi - FENS President and Chair of the ALBA Network, the two panel co-chairs will invite panelists to define their key principles for a good negotiation and share their own experience on negotiation and how it served them in their career. This will be followed by a live Q&A where the audience will ask questions to the panelists through a chat system. More information: http://www.alba.network/panel-fensforum2020
Session
13.07.2020, Monday 09:30 - 10:30 Hall A Special interest event
Date
13.07.2020, Monday
Session Time
09:30 - 10:30
Session Description
Social media has become an essential tool in the distribution of scientific information amongst professionals in the field of neuroscience and the general population, with Twitter being the platform most commonly used by scientists. How can scientists (and more specifically neuroscientists) best use Twitter to communicate science (both their own and that of others). This workshop will bring together a panel of four specialists who use Twitter on a regular basis as a tool for science communication. They will share with the audience their tips and tricks on using Twitter from making a good profile and finding the relevant people to follow, to engaging on Twitter, finding content and the best ways to interact with a community.
Session
13.07.2020, Monday 09:30 - 10:30 Hall B Special interest event
Date
13.07.2020, Monday
Session Time
09:30 - 10:30
Session Description
This interactive Special Interest Event allows you as FENS Forum participant to meet with representatives from business, industry and public sectors, all with a neuroscience background. The speakers will share with you how their neuroscience background contributed to their career-paths.
13.07.2020, Monday 09:30 - 10:30 Hall C Special interest event
Date
13.07.2020, Monday
Session Time
09:30 - 10:30
Session Description
Organised by The European Brain Council, in collaboration with FENS and the International Brain Research Organisation (IBRO) in the framework of the FENS Forum, this Special Interest Event will focus on the topic of Global Research Collaboration, highlighting the existing partnerships within research—specifically, brain research—in the European Union, the United States and China.
14.07.2020, Tuesday 09:30 - 10:30 Hall A Special interest event
Date
14.07.2020, Tuesday
Session Time
09:30 - 10:30
Session Description
Openness in the public debate on animal research has been increasing in many European countries and research institutions. Since the 2014 launch of the UK Concordat on Openness on Animal Research, research institutions in Spain, Portugal, Belgium and Switzerland have also adopted policies and practices that seek to improve transparency with the public. The event is designed to support researchers and institutions that wish to be more open about the animal research they conduct. The focal theme of the workshop is to discuss how and why scientists, researchers, press officers and other stakeholders should talk about animal research; it is not a debate about the ethics of animal experimentation.
Pre-recorded Session
Yes
14.07.2020, Tuesday 09:30 - 10:30 Hall B Special interest event
Date
14.07.2020, Tuesday
Session Time
09:30 - 10:30
Session Description
The earth’s climate is undoubtedly changing. Although scientists are, to a large extent, receptive of this fact and aware of the causes and consequences of the current environmental crisis, identifying what we can do as a community, at the level of laboratories, research institutions and individually as scientists remains elusive. This special interest event offers a forum to discuss what we can do to adopt a more sustainable model for life-sciences. The organizers will present the results of a small survey performed among neuroscientists and their research institutes to trigger the discussion on the environmental footprint of our community and to start identifying solutions. A panel of academics, activists and life-science industry representatives, among others, will share their viewpoints and experiences implementing concrete actions towards an environmentally friendly life-science framework. In addition to raising awareness on the impact of life sciences on the environment, we will highlight the need to better measure and document this impact, including plastic and Co2 emissions in scientific events and research centers. We also aim to draw up a list of concrete actions that define gold-standards of sustainability for our scientific community. Join us and add your voice to this exciting discussion!
Session
14.07.2020, Tuesday 09:30 - 10:30 Hall C Special interest event

SiE09 - NENS Graduate School Fair & Best Students' Posters - To access the e-posters and join the live session, Please click here

Date
14.07.2020, Tuesday
Session Time
09:30 - 10:30
14.07.2020, Tuesday 09:30 - 12:10 Hall D Special interest event
Date
14.07.2020, Tuesday
Session Time
09:30 - 12:10
Session Description
Improve your public presentation skills, create a story around your research or learn how to best answer journalists questions in this series of three workshops delivered by science communication specialist, Malcolm Love! This SiE includes a 10-min interactive Q&A session.