Browsing Over 14 Sessions
Day
  • 15.07.2020, Wednesday
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Plenary lecture
Room
Hall A
Date
15.07.2020, Wednesday
Session Time
08:30 - 09:30
Afternoon poster sessions

SE06- The role of Glial cells in the Era of Personalised Medicine

Room
Crowne Plaza Glasgow
Date
15.07.2020, Wednesday
Session Time
09:00 - 16:00
Morning poster sessions

P07 - Morning Poster Sessions

Room
Poster Area
Date
15.07.2020, Wednesday
Session Time
09:30 - 13:00
Parallel Symposium
Room
Hall A
Date
15.07.2020, Wednesday
Session Time
09:45 - 11:15
Session Description
There is growing appreciation that synaptic resolution connectomics can make significant contributions to neuroscience, but this is not yet universally accepted. One reason is that comprehensive, dense connectomics revealing all of the connections within a brain are the most informative for neural circuits; but to date there are only two whole brain connectomes, C. elegans (302 neurons) and the Ciona tadpole (177 neurons). By early 2020, international collaborative efforts will complete the connectome of the Drosophila larval brain (2500 neurons) and large scale circuit reconstruction from adult fly (~25000 neurons in a brain hemisphere). These brains are numerically much more complex, supporting sophisticated behaviours. This symposium will be the first to present, side by side, insights from these complete larval and adult connectomes. Experimental and computational neuroscientists leading these efforts will show how EM connectomics can deepen our understanding of sensory integration, learning and memory, action selection and navigation. These results emphasise that connectomics is not just an hypothesis generator but can produce fundamental insights into the computational architecture of the brain. We will introduce to the broad FENS audience the revolution that synaptic resolution connectomics is producing in fly circuits and behaviour. We strongly believe that these approaches will have a similar impact on vertebrate neuroscience in the near future.
Parallel Symposium
Room
Hall B
Date
15.07.2020, Wednesday
Session Time
09:45 - 11:15
Session Description
Local translation in neuronal axons and dendrites has now been investigated for more than 3 decades, starting with the discovery of polyribosomes in dendritic spines. These studies have provided examples of specific mRNA-protein interactions and their functional relevance for synapse formation and plasticity. However, the recent development of genome-wide technologies, in combination with high-resolution live imaging approaches, has allowed a more systematic characterization of the axonal/dendritic transcriptome and its dynamic regulation during neural circuit development, experience-dependent plasticity and regeneration. The objectives of this symposium will be first to discuss commonalities and differences of local transcriptomes obtained from different stages of neuronal development in various model organisms. Second, to present a new conceptual framework for the dynamic spatiotemporal control of mRNA localization and translation in different physiological contexts (axon regeneration, dendritic spine plasticity) based on high-resolution fluorescence microscopy. Third, to introduce critical novel regulatory mechanisms, including the dynamic modulation of RNA granules and non-coding RNAs. Finally, the potential (patho-)physiological significance of these mechanisms will be discussed, with a special emphasis on axon regeneration and memory formation, and how they could be harnessed for the therapy of neurodevelopmental and –degenerative diseases in the future.
Parallel Symposium
Room
Hall C
Date
15.07.2020, Wednesday
Session Time
09:45 - 11:15
Session Description
GABA plays a pivotal role in brain physiology and pathology. Despite this, GABA targets identified to reinstate normal functions in pathophysiological backgrounds are not always accessible by pharmacological interventions. Serotonin (5-HT) is emerging as a key player to address this issue, and we will tackle it from different angles: giving examples on how 5-HT modulates GABA during brain development, plasticity and cognition, and how efficiently its modulation can tackle diseased conditions.
Parallel Symposium
Room
Hall D
Date
15.07.2020, Wednesday
Session Time
09:45 - 11:15
Session Description
To successfully navigate in dynamic environments, animals rely on flexibly performing a range of computations, for instance, integrating self-motion cues to orient in darkness, but using visual landmarks if available. Despite exciting discoveries of spatial representations in the brain —e.g. head direction cells and place cells— an understanding of how these are used in navigation remains elusive. Insects, which navigate skillfully with small brains, provide tractable systems to answer such questions. Specifically, a conserved and highly structured insect brain region, the central complex (CX), has been implicated in a range of navigation-related functions, including inferring compass heading, regulating arousal level, and controlling steering.

 This symposium will aim to extract general principles by comparing CX function across species, each of which excels at different navigational tasks and offers different experimental advantages. Tom Collett will delineate the CX’s likely role in navigation based on his lab’s behavioral studies in bees and ants. Yvette Fisher will outline the cellular mechanisms underlying flexible use of visual environments to construct a heading representation. Hannah Haberkern will describe how behavioral context affects navigational computations in complex environments. Stanley Heinze will draw upon his lab’s anatomical and functional studies in a range of insect species to dissect compass navigation and path-integration.
Parallel Symposium
Room
Hall E
Date
15.07.2020, Wednesday
Session Time
09:45 - 11:15
Session Description
Our ability to form and retrieve memories is dependent upon a large network of brain regions, both within and beyond the hippocampus. Unravelling the complex network interactions is crucial for understanding memory function. The combination of cutting-edge research from multiple species (rodent, non-human primate and human) and multiple levels of analysis (mapping neuronal activation, optogenetics, in-vivo electrophysiological recordings and MRI) will provide novel insights into the functioning of brain-wide memory networks. Prof Warburton and Dr Barker work on networks of associative recognition memory. Dr Barker will present evidence of dissociated functions within a cortico-hippocampal-thalamic circuit in rodents. Prof Dr Sauvage will present work which has identified changes in hippocampal & parahippocampal circuit function in memory retrieval over time as revealed by neuronal imaging and optogenetic manipulation in rodents. Dr Mitchell will present work on retrosplenial cortex functioning, and mediodorsal thalamic-frontal cortex interactions in non-human primates using temporary inactivation and in-vivo electrophysiological recordings. Prof Ranganath will present work demonstrating the distinct properties of the anterior temporal and posterior medial networks, specifically focusing on function, hippocampal connectivity and changes in aging and neurodegeneration. This unique symposium from world leading researchers will give key functional insights into memory networks.
Parallel Symposium
Room
Hall F
Date
15.07.2020, Wednesday
Session Time
09:45 - 11:15
Session Description
The overall goal of this Symposium is to present state-of-the art research on the emerging area of inter-organ communication, where the common player is the nervous system. We will bring together researchers working in the interface between neuroscience, immunity, physiology and metabolism across diverse species. This approach will likely attract a wide audience, facilitate discussion of exciting new concepts and developments in the various fields of research and spark new interdisciplinary, collaborations. Scientific Objectives: -To examine the cellular and molecular mechanism and implications to health and disease of the crosstalk between the nervous system and other tissues and organs such as the gut, the immune system and metabolic tissues. - To bring together leading researchers from various Institutions addressing key questions on the above areas from different angles and using diverse genetically tractable whole animal model systems including mice, flies and worms. Research Subjects: -The gut-brain axis, including the role of enteroendocrine cells in the regulation of brain function in health and disease. - Nutrient sensing and signaling relay from metabolic tissues to the brain. - Neuronal circuits and the control of innate immunity.
Parallel Symposium
Room
Hall G
Date
15.07.2020, Wednesday
Session Time
09:45 - 11:15
Session Description
Parvalbumin interneurons (PVIs) are crucial for a proper excitatory/inhibitory balance in the brain, supporting development, sensory and cognitive processing, affective behaviour. This symposium will show how anomalies in PVIs play a key role in the etiology of neuropsychiatric disorders beyond gene mutations. Fast-spiking properties of PVIs make these cells vulnerable to metabolic alterations, neuroinflammation and pathological remodelling of extracellular matrix. Marta Florio will reveal novel features of cellular diversity in the brain landscape emphasising the developmental origin of PVI specialization. Kim Do will report on interactions between oxidative stress and inflammation, leading to PVI impairment in schizophrenia. Iryna Ethell will show findings on the role of MMP-9 enzyme and perineuronal nets in the impaired development of PVIs, underlying sensory hypersensitivity in Fragile X. Laura Baroncelli will discuss the selective vulnerability of PVIs in a inherited deficit of creatine, leading to atypical neurodevelopmental trajectory. Data from animal models and patients will increase the translational value of the debate. The panel, including Alberto Bacci as expert in PVI cellular physiology, represents a balanced group of senior and early career researchers from diverse geographic regions, giving the opportunity for the promotion of talented junior scientists. The choice of female speakers aspires to heighten the visibility of their research on this hot topic.
Parallel Symposium
Room
Hall H
Date
15.07.2020, Wednesday
Session Time
09:45 - 11:15
Session Description
In this symposium, we bring together neuroscientists working on several different neurodegenerative diseases and healthy ageing to discuss gene-environment interactions informing pathogenic mechanisms as well as novel interventions. The symposium will convey current understanding of the neurobiology of diseases, with a focus on their experience-dependent modulation by environmental factors, which will be essential for developing effective therapeutics. The symposium will provide data illuminating how cognitive activity, physical exercise and other environmental stimuli are protective against brain aging and disorders, particularly neurodegenerative diseases, and how inflammation has negative consequences on cognition in ageing and increasing risk of neurodegenerative diseases. The presenters will also discuss how such fundamental neuroscience discoveries could lead to novel therapeutic approaches, such as enviromimetics, to combat a range of brain disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, which constitute a major burden of disease. This Symposium would be of interest to a wide variety of neuroscientists attending the FENS Forum. It will cover a wide range of technical approaches, from molecular and cellular neuroscience through to cognitive and behavioural neuroscience. It will also include a dynamic mix of gender-balanced basic and translational neuroscience and speakers ranging from a PhD student to full professors from Germany, Scotland, and Australia.
Special Lecture
Room
Hall A
Date
15.07.2020, Wednesday
Session Time
11:45 - 12:45