Browsing Over 31 Sessions
Day
  • 13.07.2020, Monday
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Plenary lecture
Room
Hall A
Date
13.07.2020, Monday
Session Time
08:30 - 09:30
Morning poster sessions

P03 - Morning Poster Sessions

Room
Poster Area
Date
13.07.2020, Monday
Session Time
09:30 - 13:00
Parallel Symposium
Room
Hall A
Date
13.07.2020, Monday
Session Time
09:45 - 11:15
Session Description
Development of neurons is a process regulated by a myriad of signaling cascades. Neuronal progenitors give rise to neurons of different types that migrate away from their place of birth. Neuronal differentiation involves their acquisition of axon-dendrite polarity, and probing of extracellular milieu to extend the neurites in order to find pre- and postsynaptic targets. During this process the axon is guided long distances from the soma to establish functional connections. Neuronal circuits are established in the process of synapse formation and elimination. These processes are regulated on different levels – from morphogen gradients to a fine tuning of a single molecule function by signaling cascades that result in protein phosphorylation, acetylation and ubiquitylation. Accumulating evidence unveils that the state of the neuronal proteome plays an important role in development. Recent data pinpoints that neuronal identity is controlled on a level of gene expression by the process of translational inhibition. Global regulation of translation rates have been shown crucial for the transition between a progenitor and postmitotic cell stage. Additionally, local translation of critical molecules in a subcellular neuronal compartments, as well as target-specific protein degradation by the ubiquitylation machinery have been proven critical for axon physiology and axon-dendrite polarity.
Parallel Symposium
Room
Hall B
Date
13.07.2020, Monday
Session Time
09:45 - 11:15
Session Description
Immunologists have long understood that the response of macrophages and other immune cells to different stimuli is tightly controlled by a coordinated epigenetic and metabolic reprogramming of the cell´s function. This “training” of the innate immune system is, however, little explored in brain microglia. The goal of the symposium is to engage the audience in a lively discussion about recently published and unpublished findings related to metabolic and epigenetic reprogramming of microglia. In the first part we will focus on physiological conditions, and describe the role of histone deacetylases on the microglial epigenetic landscape, survival and homeostasis during development (M. Prinz); and how the phagocytosis of apoptotic newborn cells triggers an integrated epigenetic, transcriptional and metabolic remodelling of the microglial mitochondrial network (A. Sierra). In the second part, we will move to a major pathology, Alzheimer´s disease, and discuss the key role of TREM2 and other innate immune receptors in maintaining microglial metabolic fitness (M. Colonna); and how microglial inflammatory imprinting leads to immune training and exacerbates cerebral β-amyloidosis (J. Neher). We have a balanced gender, geographical distribution, and scientific seniority of the speakers. The chairperson has previous experience in event organization (2015 Euroglia organizer, 2017 Euroglia program committee, 2020 EMBL Microglia meeting organizer).
Parallel Symposium
Room
Hall C
Date
13.07.2020, Monday
Session Time
09:45 - 11:15
Session Description
Animals must learn from past experiences to guarantee survival; therefore, strong mechanisms of motivated learning have evolved. Understanding the circuit, cellular, and molecular bases of motivated learning is important to obtain insights into the etiology of anxiety and mood disorders. While the basic mechanisms of neural plasticity underlying fear memory formation and the circuit mechanisms for expressing fear memories have been explored, much less is known about the instructive signals that drive associative plasticity. In fact, exciting new advances are now being made in our understanding of how the brain transmits and encodes "teaching signals" for associative plasticity. The laboratory of Josh Johansen (Speaker #1) has identified parallel brainstem neuromodulatory and glutamatergic instructive signaling pathways to the amygdala.. Ralf Schneggenburger (Speaker #2) investigates whether the insular cortex instructs amygdalar networks during fear learning. Anna Beyeler (Speaker #3) will present evidence for a role of synaptic plasticity of insular cortex output pathways in valence coding. Finally, Andreas Lüthi (Speaker #4 concluding the Symposium) will present recent insights into the circuit level representation of teaching signals during higher order conditioning.
Parallel Symposium
Room
Hall D
Date
13.07.2020, Monday
Session Time
09:45 - 11:15
Session Description
This symposium will offer a comprehensive view of how synaptic information reaches the nucleus, how activity-dependent regulation of chromatin modulates gene transcription, and how the translational regulation of newly synthesized mRNAs impacts synaptic function in both normal and pathological states. Hilmar Bading will start at the synapse to show how antagonistic signaling between synaptic and extrasynaptic NMDA receptors controls a synapse-to-nucleus signaling pathway to regulate a neuroprotective gene program. He will present data on how innovative delivery of neuroprotective gene products can attenuate neuron dysfunction in a mouse stroke model. Anne West will focus in on the nucleus and describe how she is using single molecule fluorescence in situ and dead Cas9-mediated epigenome editing to discover how chromatin regulation of transcriptional enhancers modulates the bursting dynamics of activity-inducible genes. Tae-Kyung Kim has used leading-edge genomic methods to study the BET family of acetyl-lysine binding proteins, which he will show play isoform-specific roles in coupling chromatin structure to the regulation of activity-dependent gene transcription. Finally, Claudia Bagni will return to the synapse to discuss how the FMRP-interacting protein CYFIP1 regulates synapse structure and plasticity by orchestrating actin remodeling and protein synthesis. Her work helps to explain how CYFIP1 haploinsufficiency results in neurological and psychiatric disorders.
Parallel Symposium
Room
Hall E
Date
13.07.2020, Monday
Session Time
09:45 - 11:15
Session Description
The serotonergic system impacts many behaviors and is the most common target of psychiatric drugs. However, even though this system has been studied intensively for decades, overarching models that comprehensively describe the function(s) of serotonin are lacking. This stands in contrast to other neuromodulatory systems where strong frameworks exist, for example the reward prediction error framework for dopaminergic signaling. In this workshop, we will bring together four speakers who investigate how serotonergic circuits control the behavior of diverse animals: worms, fish, mice, and monkeys. It is our hope that this comparison over an evolutionary scale will illuminate conserved, critical roles for serotonin. There will be four seminars and reserved time for questions, discussion, and brainstorming. The four speakers bring cutting-edge approaches, such as whole-brain calcium imaging, to the study of serotonergic circuits. (1) Flavell (MIT) will discuss the role of serotonin in foraging behaviors in C. elegans, (2) Robson/Li (starting lab at Max Planck in 2019) will discuss serotonergic control of Zebrafish foraging and prey capture, (3) Warden (Cornell) will discuss serotonergic control of locomotion patterns across varying environmental contexts in mice, (4) Nienborg (Tuebingen) will discuss functions of serotonin in controlling sensory responses in primates. The lineup of speakers is balanced for gender diversity and represents institutions from Europe and the USA.
Parallel Symposium
Room
Hall F
Date
13.07.2020, Monday
Session Time
09:45 - 11:15
Session Description
This symposium will examine the neurobiological links between poor sleep, high stress, the gut, appetite and weight gain. We have assembled the below experts to deliver the symposium. This selection is a balance of early and established investigators, males and females, representing UK, German, French, Chinese and USA nationalities. Chair: Dr Wei Ba, a Chinese neuroscientist, is an EMBO Fellow and she studies sleep circuitry and stress. Speakers: Prof. Lora Heisler, US neuroscientist now based in Scotland, will present her group’s breaking research on how brainstem and hypothalamic 5-HT circuitry interacts to promote and restrict calorie intake, stress and arousal. Dr Raphaelle Winsky-Sommerer is a French neuroscientist based at the University of Surrey. She will discuss her latest discovery of an exciting link suggesting that REM sleep protects against chronic stress and weight gain. Prof. William Wisden’s recently identified circuitry that induces both NREM sleep and body cooling and that receives inputs from satiety centres. He will present new data for how satiety, sleep and body temperature are linked. Prof. Matthias H. Tschöp will present data on new drugs that modulate gut-derived signals within the brain and thereby indirectly adjust the control of appetite and metabolism and other metabolic control organs. Some of these compounds are already in clinical trials and showing promising results.This symposium will examine the neurobiological links between poor sleep, high stress, the gut, appetite and weight gain. We have assembled the below experts to deliver the symposium. This selection is a balance of early and established investigators, males and females, representing UK, German, French, Chinese and USA nationalities. Chair: Dr Wei Ba, a Chinese neuroscientist, is an EMBO Fellow and she studies sleep circuitry and stress. Speakers: Prof. Lora Heisler, US neuroscientist now based in Scotland, will present her group’s breaking research on how brainstem and hypothalamic 5-HT circuitry interacts to promote and restrict calorie intake, stress and arousal. Dr Raphaelle Winsky-Sommerer is a French neuroscientist based at the University of Surrey. She will discuss her latest discovery of an exciting link suggesting that REM sleep protects against chronic stress and weight gain. Prof. William Wisden’s recently identified circuitry that induces both NREM sleep and body cooling and that receives inputs from satiety centres. He will present new data for how satiety, sleep and body temperature are linked. Prof. Matthias H. Tschöp will present data on new drugs that modulate gut-derived signals within the brain and thereby indirectly adjust the control of appetite and metabolism and other metabolic control organs. Some of these compounds are already in clinical trials and showing promising results.
Parallel Symposium
Room
Hall G
Date
13.07.2020, Monday
Session Time
09:45 - 11:15
Session Description
The last decade has witnessed an increased interest in oxytocin as a therapeutic for mental disorders, leading to a surge in basic and clinical research on oxytocin. Several key questions have been raised regarding the basic mechanisms of oxytocin action, brain penetrance of intranasal oxytocin, clinical implications of oxytocin treatment, and the validity of animal models for human-related disorders and their use for assessing the therapeutic potential of novel treatments. This symposium, chaired by Drs. Hala Harony-Nicolas (Mount Sinai Hospital, USA) and Alexandre Charlet (CNRS, France), will host both basic and clinical scientists. Dr. Shlomo Wagner (University of Haifa, Israel) will discuss the role of oxytocin in modulating neuronal and molecular mechanisms of social recognition in rodents, including those that model autism. Dr. Wolfgang Kelsch (Heidelberg University, Germany) will talk about the role of oxytocin in social information processing in rodents’ sensory networks. Dr. Mary Lee (NIH, USA) will discuss the penetrance of exogenous oxytocin into the primate brain. Dr. Elissar Andari (Emory University, USA) will present findings from the Autism Oxytocin Brain Project on dose-dependent effects of oxytocin on behavior and functional connectivity in individuals with autism. Together, the speakers will raise provocative questions on oxytocin as a potential therapeutic and spark discussion about the feasibility of using rodent models to study human mental illnesses.
Parallel Symposium
Room
Hall H
Date
13.07.2020, Monday
Session Time
09:45 - 11:15
Session Description
Response inhibition is a fundamental property of executive control, as it represents a hinge of behavioral flexibility. At any moment, we need to select and perform actions whenever they are more opportune, i.e., whenever the costs associated with them are lower than their benefits. Thus, the opportunity of executing an action must be evaluated continuously as environmental conditions, or our internal states can change unpredictably, making the selected action inappropriate for achieving desired goals. In such instances, movements must be suppressed. Despite the crucial role of inhibitory control, its generation and its neural substrates are still debated and controversial. Some support the idea that inhibition depends upon a dedicated module, which corresponds to a small right-lateralized network comprising the inferior frontal gyrus, the pre-supplementary motor area, and the subthalamic nucleus. Others sustain that response inhibition is an emergent property of a larger neural network which largely overlaps with the one implementing response planning. This debate addresses a very general question; i.e., how do complex cognitive processes map onto the brain? Could executive functions be localized in specific modules or not? The answers will provide a deeper understanding of cognitive control in healthy and of psychiatric disorders characterized by the inability to control impulses such as the Obsessive–Compulsive Disorder and the Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.
Special interest event

SiE07 - Neuroscience career paths

Room
Hall B
Date
13.07.2020, Monday
Session Time
12:15 - 13:30
Session Description
This interactive Special Interest Event allows you as FENS Forum participant to meet with representatives from business, industry and public sectors, all with a neuroscience background. The speakers will share with you how their neuroscience background contributed to their career-paths. Following this event, the speakers will be available to answer your questions in an informal setting within the Forum career and training area from 14:30-15:30. This event will be followed by the FENS Job fair from 15:30 - 17:30.
Special interest event
Room
Hall A
Date
13.07.2020, Monday
Session Time
12:15 - 13:30
Session Description
Social media has become an essential tool in the distribution of scientific information amongst professionals in the field of neuroscience and the general population, with Twitter being the platform most commonly used by scientists. How can scientists (and more specifically neuroscientists) best use Twitter to communicate science (both their own and that of others). This workshop will bring together a panel of four specialists who use Twitter on a regular basis as a tool for science communication. They will share with the audience their tips and tricks on using Twitter from making a good profile and finding the relevant people to follow, to engaging on Twitter, finding content and the best ways to interact with a community.