Browsing Over 130 Sessions

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  • Parallel Symposium (16) (16)
  • Technical Workshop (1) (1)
  • Plenary lecture (2) (2)
  • Morning poster sessions (1) (1)
  • Special interest event (4) (4)
  • Afternoon poster sessions (1) (1)
  • Networking Event (1) (1)
  • Special Lecture (3) (3)
Poster Area
Hall A
Hall B
Hall C
Hall D
Hall E
Hall F
Hall G
Hall H
  • 08:00
  • 09:00
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  • 11:00
  • 12:00
  • 13:00
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  • 15:00
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  • 21:00
  • Session Time
    08:30 - 09:30
    Session Type
    Plenary lecture
  • Session Time
    09:45 - 11:15
    Session Type
    Parallel Symposium
    Session Description
    The cerebral cortex represents the largest brain area and consists of an extraordinary number and diversity of neurons and glial cells. Yet, how the cortex, with all its neuronal circuits, arises from the neural stem cells (NSCs) in the developing neuroepithelium is a major unsolved question. In our symposium we will focus on a key aspect of cortical development: what are the mechanisms in NSCs regulating the balance between proliferation and differentiation to specify the cerebral cortex of its correct size and composition? The specific objectives shall address 1) the principles of NSC lineage progression during cortical development; 2) the cellular and molecular mechanisms controlling neuron and glia output from NSCs; 3) how disruption of NSC behavior upon mutation of particular signaling pathways leads to cortical malformation and 4) how cell-intrinsic and niche-derived factors interact to regulate NSC behavior. We will present novel conceptual advances with the ultimate goal to synthesize a general framework how intrinsic programs in NSCs in combination with extrinsic niche components regulate neuron genesis within the neurogenic microenvironment. Altogether, the symposium will focus not only on the developmental mechanisms of corticogenesis, but also include aspects of molecular neuroscience, cell biology, and neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disease neuroscience. We are convinced that our symposium will thus be of interest to a broad audience of neuroscientists.
  • Session Time
    12:30 - 13:30
    Session Type
    Special interest event
    Session Description
    The principles of replacement, refinement and reduction - the “Three Rs” put forward by the European Directive on the protection of animals used for scientific purposes - continue to shape scientific research across the EU and beyond. In this context, the search for alternatives to animal models increasingly influences the development of research projects. At the same time, the importance of employing the correct model - be that animal or otherwise - remains key to the reliability, and indeed utility, of any results. The discussion will cover situations involving a shift from high to low complexity models, from animal models to experiments in humans, and animal to in vitro models. Speakers who have made such changes will discuss their reasons for doing so, the challenges encountered and the impact on their working methods.
  • Session Time
    13:30 - 14:15
    Session Type
    Special Lecture
  • Session Time
    15:45 - 17:15
    Session Type
    Parallel Symposium
    Session Description
    Several recent discoveries about hippocampal CA2 challenge the classical perception of hippocampal memory processing. CA2 has been shown to be crucial for social memory, the regulation of hippocampal oscillations and likely also for sequence memory. Place cells in CA2 remap upon passage of time, contextual changes and are partly activated during immobility. Plasticity is under strict control and can be modulated by various neuromodulatory substances. Featuring investigators from USA, Japan, France and Norway, balanced across career stages, expertise of the speakers range from molecular and cellular physiology to in-vivo electrophysiology, behavior and computational modelling. The symposium will promote joint trans-disciplinary efforts towards transforming the separate discoveries into a coherent conceptual understanding of CA2. While many pressing questions remain, it is already clear now that this small region will demand a major update in how we think about the formation of episodic memory.
  • Session Time
    17:30 - 18:30
    Session Type
    Plenary lecture
  • Session Time
    19:00 - 21:00
    Session Type
    Networking Event
    Session Description
    The CAJAL Advanced Neuroscience Training Programme is happy to invite all past course participants and stakeholders (students, course directors, speakers, instructors as well as our partners and sponsors) to gather around drinks & snacks and share their CAJAL experience.
  • Session Time
    09:45 - 11:15
    Session Type
    Parallel Symposium
    Session Description
    New optogenetic, imaging and electrophysiology techniques available in rodents have made huge contributions to our understanding of how the brain represents sensory information. However, natural stimuli are invariably multisensory, creating complex signals that must be integrated across different modalities. Despite a wealth of human psychophysics and neural recordings from individual cells, we still have many outstanding questions about the circuit mechanisms underlying multisensory integration. An increasing number of groups are beginning to answer these questions using state-of-the-art techniques to record and manipulate large neural populations in rodents. Techniques such as targeted optogenetics can be used to modulate the activity of specific neuronal populations during behaviour or to unravel the connectivity across brain regions. Moreover, neural activity during complex multisensory tasks is being recorded with high-throughput electrophysiology in freely moving and head-fixed animals. The speakers are at the forefront of applying these techniques to interrogate and manipulate the mechanisms of multisensory integration at every scale, from microcircuits (Medini) and neural populations (Diamond) to brain regions (Coen) and behavioural states (Lee). They have revealed that facets of multisensory integration exist throughout the brain, from primary sensory regions, to more complex cognitive areas in frontal cortex.
  • Session Time
    12:30 - 13:30
    Session Type
    Special interest event
    Session Description
    Organised by the FENS-Kavli Network of Excellence (FKNE) under the umbrella of the FENS Committee for Higher Education and Training (CHET), the event will focus on topics relevant for senior postdocs, newly appointed and mid-carrier PIs. The approached themes include: how to get the first PI position, selection of team members, application and management of funds, the mid-carrier gap, early and mid-career mobility, and coping with stress while balancing life with career. The overall aim of the event is to bring together the attendees with current mid-carrier FKNE and FKNE alumni PIs to share concrete experiences and problem-solving skills, and start to create a network among the future generation of PIs.
  • Session Time
    13:30 - 14:15
    Session Type
    Special Lecture
  • Session Time
    15:45 - 17:15
    Session Type
    Parallel Symposium
    Session Description
    Here we aim to present a multidisciplinary range of important and timely findings that address the apparent stalemate in our attempts to understand causal interactions between astroglial and neural networks. Progressing from the level of synapses to that of cellular networks in vivo, we will discuss: recently discovered mechanisms underpinning use-dependent plasticity of synaptic astroglial environment; newly identified principles of astroglial signal exchange with inhibitory synapses; unexpected roles of astroglial hemi-channels in shaping brain circuitry; novel imaging methods unveiling the role of astroglia in synchronized brain states. The speakers were selected based on (i) their track record of cutting-edge research on astroglia-neuron interactions, (ii) their roles in developing new imaging methods to monitor astroglial-neural ensembles in the brain, at multiple levels and during sensory input, (iii) their proven ability to engage a multidisciplinary audience, (iv) their representing a diverse community of scientists working in the area. The novelty of the proposal lies, firstly, with the newly discovered phenomena and previously untested principles that might explain how astroglia contribute to the brain network dynamics, and secondly, with the methodological breakthroughs enabling previously unattainable experimental quests. The general interest stems from the long-standing, unresolved scientific questions that the speakers attempt to tackle, as outlined above.
  • Session Time
    18:45 - 20:30
    Session Type
    Special interest event
    Session Description
    This event is convened by the FENS-Kavli Network of Excellence. This workshop will communicate insights and experience on advocacy activities for neuroscience policy and funding in Europe. The goal of the workshop is to inform neuroscience researchers about strategies, mechanisms, and challenges of science advocacy in Europe; and to encourage individuals to find effective ways of engaging on policy issues. Speakers will include active neuroscientists with significant experience in science advocacy, as well as policy professionals who work on a daily basis in implementing neuroscience funding and organization. The event will include a panel discussion where audience engagement is highly encouraged.Monica Di Luca (Chair of European Brain Council)Camilla Bellone (Policy and Advocacy Committee, Society for Neuroscience)Tim Raemaekkers (DG Research & Innovation at European Commission)Mark Ferguson (European Innovation Council & Science Foundation Ireland)Nicolas Voilley (European Research Council)
  • Session Time
    09:45 - 11:15
    Session Type
    Parallel Symposium
    Session Description
    Behavioral mechanisms are defined by the function of underlying neural circuits. To understand the logic of circuit-level computations guiding behavior, it is necessary to define how the interactions between components of the circuitry are modulated to mediate behavioral outcomes. This symposium will bring together leading cellular neuroscientists from different countries aiming to provide insights into latest advances in understanding neuromodulatory mechanisms of behavioral control. In the first part of this symposium, Roger Clem will discuss contributions of GABA and somatostatin signaling to mnemonic functions of somatostatin interneurons in mPFC. Fear learning augments activity of these cells, and their activation is both necessary and sufficient for fear expression. Then, Ingrid Ehrlich will present results on functional roles of intercalated cell networks in fear learning and extinction, and modulation of these networks by dopaminergic inputs from midbrain areas. In the second part of the symposium, Christian Lüscher will provide evidence that strong activation of a positive reinforcement circuit, either by addictive drugs or via optogenetic stimulation, is sufficient to drive addictive behavior, leading to compulsion. Finally, Vadim Bolshakov will present results on how anxiety-related behavioral states are controlled by neuropeptides at the level of neural circuits in amygdala and BNST, inducing changes in functional interactions between their structural components.
  • Session Time
    12:30 - 13:30
    Session Type
    Special interest event
    Session Description
    When Brian Daniels, the author of the play attended the 50th birthday party of his friends Irene Heron and Rachael Dixey, in 1997, he remembers it as a joyful and exuberant event. Nobody then could have guessed that ten years later the vivacious and theatrical Irene would be developing early onset dementia and fifteen years later she would have lost her functioning powers, be in a care home and she would die aged 66 in 2013. Her partner of 25 years, Professor Rachael Dixey wrote in her journal every day about the challenges of living with a partner who had dementia. She asked Brian to read the journal and he was then inspired by write a play about family life and early onset dementia. Irene was cared for in a nursing home in Yorkshire. In the same nursing home was Chris Toulman. Chris and his wife Cindy had been married for over 40 years and were a devoted couple. Chris had never had a good memory but warning bells started to sound when he started getting into a muddle when doing the accounts of his garage business. He would sometimes do the MOT twice on a car, forgetting he had already done the work. Eventually he was diagnosed with dementia and in time went into full time care. His wife visited him every day, and all day, talking to him, feeding him and loving him. Chris died in his early 60s. With the support of both families Brian embarked on writing these very personal stories. He wanted to explore through a play the way in which dementia impacts on the wider family and whether love ever becomes a duty. The first ‘shared’ performances of the play were at the West Yorkshire Playhouse, Leeds and the play has gone on to have to date (November 2017) more than 150 performances throughout the UK and Northern Ireland. The play has also been filmed by Birmingham NHS Trust to help educate around the complexities of the Mental Capacity Act.
  • Session Time
    13:30 - 14:15
    Session Type
    Special Lecture
  • Session Time
    15:45 - 17:15
    Session Type
    Parallel Symposium
    Session Description
    This symposium will present the latest advances in the study of neural circuits for somatosensation at both spinal and supraspinal levels. This topic is particularly timely, as we are just starting to dissect these circuits. Our speakers comprise a multinational group of researchers. Notably, this symposium will present results from different subfields of somatosensation (e.g. pain, itch, touch) and a range of techniques (electrophysiology, optogenetics, molecular genetics), in order to present the audience with state-of-the-art approaches to defining functional circuitry. We will report the study of spinal neural circuits underlying touch, and how local inhibitory neurons gate sensory feedback to the spinal motor system during walking (Bourane et al., Cell, 2015; Koch et al., Neuron, 2017). The functional diversity of the spinal neural circuits is complemented by the study of gating mechanisms for itch sensation (Bourane et al., Science, 2015; Ralvenius et al., Nat Commun. 2018; Pagani et al., Neuron, In press). We will also present functional studies on ascending pathways for itch and pain (Han et al., Cell, 2015; Mu et al., Science 2017). In addition, we will show the circuit mechanism underlying descending modulation of the spinal itch circuit (Gao et al., Neuron, 2019). These studies have dissected circuit mechanisms of both the sensory and emotional components of somatosensation, and will be of great interest to a broad scientific audience.
  • Session Time
    18:45 - 20:30
    Session Type
    Technical Workshop
    Session Description
    During the evening session - workshop format - several round tables will be organised simultaneously, and the afore-mentioned topics from the lunch seminar session will be discussed in-depth between the FKNE Scholars and alumni, and selected participants. This evening workshop is limited to 50 participants. Registration is required for this event. Priority in selection will be given to senior postdocs, recently appointed and mid-career PIs.
  • Session Time
    09:45 - 11:15
    Session Type
    Parallel Symposium
    Session Description
    The hippocampus is critical for the formation of episodic memories, and we are just beginning to understand how the hippocampus forms associations between stimuli in both time and space. In this workshop, we will explore recent work on the formation of associations and memories in the human hippocampus. These studies use recordings of single-neuron activity in the hippocampus of epilepsy patients implanted with electrodes for clinical diagnostics. In our workshop, Rodrigo Quian Quiroga will first present how single neurons act in the dynamic formation of associations in the human hippocampus. Johannes Sarnthein will then present how persistent firing of single neurons in the medial temporal lobe is embedded in the cortical working memory network. Doris Dijksterhuis will describe how single cells in the hippocampus form rapid links between words in a sentence reading task. Finally, Florian Mormann will show how long-term memory of complex items is reflected in long-term recordings of concept cells in the hippocampus. The speakers will present an overview of their research with human single neurons in Europe with high scientific interest internationally. The recent data extend knowledge from animal experiments to the complex tasks amenable only in humans. The existing models of cognitive processing should be tested on these data and possibly adapted.
  • Session Time
    15:45 - 17:15
    Session Type
    Parallel Symposium
    Session Description
    This symposium aims at advertising recent breakthroughs in the understanding of the neural basis for auditory perception. A number of new studies have identified some of the computations performed by neuronal circuits in the central auditory system for making sense of sounds during behavior. Each speaker of the symposium will be presenting new research identifying different cortical neurons or circuits engaged by specific stimulus features and brain states during auditory behavioral tasks. The choice of speakers is based on their expertise in the neural basis for perception in the central auditory system. They use multidisciplinary approaches and complement each other in terms of their primary target (system, circuit or neuronal level), focus (cortico-central or not) and technical approach (functional imaging, electrophysiology, optogenetics or computational models). The panel is also diverse in terms of seniority, geographical location and gender. The auditory cortex has been underrepresented in the past in comparison to the visual or somatosensory cortex. Recent research directions are changing this. In addition, more and more projects are interested in auditory processing in the context of multisensory integration. In this context, a deeper understanding of the computations of the central auditory system during behavior is timely extremely relevant.
  • Session Time
    09:45 - 11:15
    Session Type
    Parallel Symposium
    Session Description
    Over the past years, an increasing body of work investigating the biology of RNA-protein interplay has shed novel insights into neuronal homeostasis and pathology while the unique biology of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) and Stress granules (SGs) is altering our view of the genesis of protein misfolding diseases. While, stressed cells shut down translation, release mRNA from ribosomes, and form SGs that may cause neurodegeneration, the etiopathogenic relationship between these activities remains enigmatic. This symposium will present recent and unpublished (human- and animal-based) findings about the etiopathogenic implications of RBPs and SGs in a broad spectrum of neurological disorders such as Alzheimer and Parkinson’ diseases (AD & PD), Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and Stress-driven depression. Dr Alberti (Germany) will present novel evidence about a complex mechanism of phase separation of G3BP1, an RBP, that may cause SGs formation and neurodegeneration in ALS while Dr Kouroupi (Greece) will focus on the RBPs role in PD synaptic and axonal degeneration. Prof. Wolozin (USA) will present the essential role of TIA-1, another RBP, in the formation of SGs and its causal relationship to oligomerization and spreading of Tau pathology while Dr Sotiropoulos (Portugal) will describe the implication of RBPs and SGs into the mechanisms which lifetime (environmental) stress, a risk factor for AD, trigger autophagy inhibition and Tau aggregation precipitating brain pathology.
  • Session Time
    15:45 - 17:15
    Session Type
    Parallel Symposium
    Session Description
    Being motivated is vital for success, with impaired motivation common across neurology and psychiatry. Dopamine and serotonin have been linked to motivation through their roles in value-based decisions. However, understanding motivation may only come from examining the neurobiology underlying decisions that species have evolved to solve. Yet, neuroscience has ignored a crucial real world problem that species must solve: how to forage for rewards in patchy environments. Foraging successfully requires decisions between persisting with collecting rewards in a current location (patch), or travelling to forage elsewhere. Here, we dissect the roles of dopamine and serotonin in ‘patch-leaving’ decisions. Prof. Mainen (Champalimaud) will show how optogenetic activation of serotonin neurons increases the willingness of mice to persist in patches. Using photometry in the mesolimbic system Dr. Grima (Janelia/Oxford) will examine the contribution of dopamine in signalling the value of patches in different contexts. Prof. Cools (Donders Centre) will show how individual differences in dopamine synthesis in healthy people, measured using PET, is predictive of persistence. Lastly, Dr. Apps (Oxford) will outline how Parkinson’s Disease patients with motivational impairments show dopamine-dependent modulations of patch-leaving. This work highlights the utility of ecologically based frameworks for understanding neuromodulatory systems and the consequences of dysfunction in disease.
  • Session Time
    09:45 - 11:15
    Session Type
    Parallel Symposium
    Session Description
    Even for the same task, one rarely observes the exact same cortical response twice. Such variability is ubiquitous throughout the brain, and is observed at all spatial scales, from single synapse function to collective activity of entire brain areas. Is variability merely a result of unavoidable noise in the system, or is it harnessed and even enforced by the brain as an integral part of computation? Variability is a highly timely topic; its ubiquitous presence is becoming clearer than ever, thanks to the massively parallel data being recorded currently. At the same time, insight into variability is crucial for understanding the neural code that these data allow us to investigate with unprecedented detail. Typically, studies into variability either take a descriptive approach, quantifying what kind of factors reduce variability; or a constructive approach, deriving the significance of variability for brain function. In this workshop, we bring together the descriptive and constructive perspectives. Kenneth Harris and Timothy O’Leary will discuss the properties of variability in brain-wide population activity and smaller neural circuits; Anna Levina and Christian Machens will derive the benefits and detriments of variability for brain function. Our speakers are 50% junior and 25% female, and are from three European countries: Germany, Great Britain, and Portugal. Including the organizers, we comprise 67% junior and 50% female faculty representing four nationalities.
  • Session Time
    15:45 - 17:15
    Session Type
    Parallel Symposium
    Session Description
    The pre- and postnatal subventricular zone (SVZ) contains a large reservoir of neural stem cells (NSC). However, the extent, mechanisms and function of SVZ neurogenesis are not fully understood. We aim to present new results regarding important modulatory mechanisms of SVZ neurogenesis. In addition, we will present new migration routes for neuroblasts from the postnatal SVZ both in rodents and humans. Dr. Götz will focus on the centrosome protein Akna that modulates NSC delamination, lineage progression, and adult neurogenesis (Camargo et al., Nature 2019) and the nuclear protein Trnp1 that influences brain folding (Stahl et al., Cell 2013). Dr. Alfonso will show that nascent periventricular vessels in the ventral telenchephalon communicate with actively dividing NSC via endothelial filopodia, modulating the apical progenitor cell cycle dynamics and progeny output. Dr. Paredes will extend pioneering work on intra-cortical migration from the SVZ during human infancy (Paredes et al., Science, 2016), presenting new data on the contribution of the caudal ganglionic eminence (CGE) to the population of interneurons that continue to migrate in the early postnatal human cortex. Dr. Inta will talk about the translational relevance of the widespread neuronal migration from the postnatal SVZ into cortex and striatum in mice (Inta et al., PNAS, 2008), focusing on the potential role in schizophrenia and the effect of psychiatric treatments.
  • Session Time
    09:45 - 11:15
    Session Type
    Parallel Symposium
    Session Description
    The dentate gyrus (DG) is the entrance gate of the hippocampus and translates the rich input stream from the entorhinal cortex into sparse non-overlapping memories. The network mechanisms underlying sparse coding are however largely unknown. This symposium will highlight new insights on the role of the various cellular components of the DG network, glutamatergic granule cells (GCs) and GABAergic inhibitory interneurons in the sparse coding of information and the spatio-temporal emergence of DG population activity during learning. We will provide new insights on the relationship between the rich input stream from the lateral and medial entorhinal cortex to the DG and the sparse activity patterns of GC populations. Despite the important role of the DG as patterns separator allowing the discrimination between similar but distinct memories, we provide evidence that the DG is also involved in decision-making and planning. Finally, we provide evidence that representation of contextual information depends on the attentive state of the animal. We will present recently published and unpublished data obtained with state-of-the-art techniques including multiple single unit recordings of neuron types in behaving rodents, optophysiological manipulations of neuron types to test their role in cell assembly formation during learning and decision-making, as well as population imaging during learning in the virtual reality.
  • Session Time
    15:45 - 17:15
    Session Type
    Parallel Symposium
    Session Description
    Over the last decade, advances in human genetics have identified a variety of genes underlying neurodevelopmental disorders that implicate specific pathways in the development of ASD/ID. Our symposium addresses recent work to bridge the divide between these identified mutations and a mechanistic understanding of the synaptic dysfunction contributing to cognitive and behavioral changes. This symposium brings together scientists working at the forefront of functional genetics in neurodevelopmental disorders who are studying the molecular, cellular and synaptic disruptions caused by mutations in genes associated with ASD/ID to better understand the etiology of ASD/ID and underlying molecular pathways. Importantly, this work opens the door for novel treatments and points to the potential for reversibility of neuropathological changes. The speakers will discuss: 1) Identification of novel molecular mechanisms and new targets for treatment in ASD animal models using Translating Ribosome Affinity Purification (TRAP) and RNA-seq (Emily Osterweil); 2) the study of mechanisms underlying synaptic dysfunction caused by rare variants in neuroligin 4X identified in ASD (Katherine Roche); 3) the role of neuroligin 3 in regulating oxytocin signaling in social behaviors and the effects of an autism-associated mutation in neuroligin 3 (Peter Scheiffele); and 4) recent advances in understanding the genetics of autism and applying this insight to the development of therapeutics (Gaia Novarino).
  • Session Time
    09:45 - 11:15
    Session Type
    Parallel Symposium
    Session Description
    Spontaneous network activity plays an essential role in the establishment of sensory circuits. At embryonic stages, spontaneous activity is highly synchronized and is mediated by electrical communication. Activity patterns gradually desynchronize postnatally as a consequence of the maturation of the electrical properties of the network. This symposium aims to compare and contrast the role of spontaneous activity during different developmental stages and across sensory systems. Anne Sinning will describe how spontaneous activity in developing cortical networks matures, its physiological role and the pathophysiological implications of its alteration. Guillermina López-Bendito will present recent findings demonstrating that spontaneous activity in the thalamus is fundamental for the emergence and plasticity of sensory maps already in the embryonic brain. Dwight Bergles will discuss the mechanisms controlling spontaneous activity in the postnatal developing auditory system, which is driven by periodic activity bursts in the cochlea before hearing onset. Marla Feller will conclude the symposium by showing that the interaction between spontaneous activity and early light responses in the retina helps refining visual circuits. Our goal is to not only highlight the specific functions of spontaneous activity during different phases of development, but also and in particular, discuss the common fundamental principles of early activity-dependent network development.
  • Session Time
    15:45 - 17:15
    Session Type
    Parallel Symposium
    Session Description
    This symposium aims to present the new frontiers of genetic tools in rodents and primates, specifically, we will introduce: 1. The development of novel genetically encoded sensors for rapid, sensitive, specific detection of diverse neuromodulators, including neurotransmitters and neuropeptides, in rodents and primates brain during behavior. 2.The use of single cell profiling technologies (single cell RNA-seq and ATAC-seq) to define cell types in mouse brain and design cell-type specific genetic tools. 3. The application of the CRISPR/Cas9 system to create genetically modified (GM) non-human primates (e.g. disease models, and genetic tools, including optogenetic effector and, neuron-specific Cre transgenic monkeys). 4. The application of optogenetics to study neuron-glia networks in the brain.This symposium aims to present the new frontiers of genetic tools in rodents and primates, specifically, we will introduce: 1.The development of novel genetically encoded sensors for rapid, sensitive, specific detection of diverse neuromodulators, including neurotransmitters and neuropeptides, in rodents and primates brain during behavior. 2.The use of single cell profiling technologies (single cell RNA-seq and ATAC-seq) to define cell types in mouse brain and design cell-type specific genetic tools. 3.The application of the CRISPR/Cas9 system to create genetically modified (GM) non-human primates (e.g. disease models, and genetic tools, including optogenetic effector and, neuron-specific Cre transgenic monkeys). 4.The application of optogenetics to study neuron-glia networks in the brain.