Browsing Over 130 Sessions

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  • Parallel Symposium (16) (16)
  • Plenary lecture (2) (2)
  • Morning poster sessions (1) (1)
  • Special interest event (7) (7)
  • Afternoon poster sessions (1) (1)
  • Special Lecture (3) (3)
  • Award Ceremony (1) (1)
Poster Area
Hall A
Hall B
Hall C
Hall D
Hall E
Hall F
Hall G
Hall H
Huntarian Museum (off-site)
off-site
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  • Session Time
    08:30 - 09:30
    Session Type
    Plenary lecture
  • Session Time
    09:45 - 11:15
    Session Type
    Parallel Symposium
    Session Description
    Development of neurons is a process regulated by a myriad of signaling cascades. Neuronal progenitors give rise to neurons of different types that migrate away from their place of birth. Neuronal differentiation involves their acquisition of axon-dendrite polarity, and probing of extracellular milieu to extend the neurites in order to find pre- and postsynaptic targets. During this process the axon is guided long distances from the soma to establish functional connections. Neuronal circuits are established in the process of synapse formation and elimination. These processes are regulated on different levels – from morphogen gradients to a fine tuning of a single molecule function by signaling cascades that result in protein phosphorylation, acetylation and ubiquitylation. Accumulating evidence unveils that the state of the neuronal proteome plays an important role in development. Recent data pinpoints that neuronal identity is controlled on a level of gene expression by the process of translational inhibition. Global regulation of translation rates have been shown crucial for the transition between a progenitor and postmitotic cell stage. Additionally, local translation of critical molecules in a subcellular neuronal compartments, as well as target-specific protein degradation by the ubiquitylation machinery have been proven critical for axon physiology and axon-dendrite polarity.
  • Session Time
    12:15 - 13:30
    Session Type
    Special interest event
    Session Description
    Social media has become an essential tool in the distribution of scientific information amongst professionals in the field of neuroscience and the general population, with Twitter being the platform most commonly used by scientists. How can scientists (and more specifically neuroscientists) best use Twitter to communicate science (both their own and that of others). This workshop will bring together a panel of four specialists who use Twitter on a regular basis as a tool for science communication. They will share with the audience their tips and tricks on using Twitter from making a good profile and finding the relevant people to follow, to engaging on Twitter, finding content and the best ways to interact with a community.
  • Session Time
    13:30 - 14:15
    Session Type
    Special Lecture
  • Session Time
    15:30 - 17:30
    Session Type
    Special interest event
    Session Description
    The Network of European Neuroscience Schools (NENS) brings together over 180 graduate neuroscience schools and programmes representing approximately 30 European countries. MSc and PhD neuroscience school programmes will present themselves during the NENS Graduate School Fair throughout the FENS Forum 2020. Join us at the NENS Fair where you will have the opportunity to share experiences and get detailed information about the attending graduate neuroscience under-graduate and graduate programmes. Further, you will have the chance to see the work of the students enrolled in these graduate schools: the best 10 selected posters of the school programmes registered with NENS will be displayed at the Fair. Students are particularly encouraged to visit the NENS Fair area.
  • Session Time
    15:45 - 17:15
    Session Type
    Parallel Symposium
    Session Description
    It is forty years since Norman G. Bowery started the journey for many of us, when he discovered and named the most abundant inhibitory G protein–coupled receptors in the mammalian brain, the GABA-B receptors. Although initially quite neglected, in the last few years their important role on a number of neural processes and conditions, including synaptic plasticity and desensitization, has been identified. Further, there has been substantial work indicating diversity of the GABA-B receptors in functional properties, cellular signaling and subcellular distribution affecting various neurotransmitter networks and brain regions. Most importantly, there has been extensive research on the role of GABA-B receptors in various neuropsychiatric disorders, including addiction, anxiety and major depressive disorder, at preclinical and/or clinical level. In this long journey, the role of GABA-B receptors as possible therapeutic targets for these disorders has also been investigated with promising findings. The journey (to Ithaca) continues and four of the leading scientists in the GABA-B receptor field, at junior and senior level, will be presenting their respective GABA-B receptor work that spreads from cellular/molecular to cognitive and behavioural processes, with a particular focus on depression, addiction and reward.
  • Session Time
    17:15 - 17:30
    Session Type
    Award Ceremony
  • Session Time
    18:45 - 20:45
    Session Type
    Special interest event
    Session Description
    Openness in the public debate on animal research has been increasing in many European countries and research institutions. Since the 2014 launch of the UK Concordat on Openness on Animal Research, research institutions in Spain, Portugal, Belgium and Switzerland have also adopted policies and practices that seek to improve transparency with the public. The event is designed to support researchers and institutions that wish to be more open about the animal research they conduct. The focal theme of the workshop is to discuss how and why scientists, researchers, press officers and other stakeholders should talk about animal research; it is not a debate about the ethics of animal experimentation.
  • Session Time
    09:45 - 11:15
    Session Type
    Parallel Symposium
    Session Description
    Immunologists have long understood that the response of macrophages and other immune cells to different stimuli is tightly controlled by a coordinated epigenetic and metabolic reprogramming of the cell´s function. This “training” of the innate immune system is, however, little explored in brain microglia. The goal of the symposium is to engage the audience in a lively discussion about recently published and unpublished findings related to metabolic and epigenetic reprogramming of microglia. In the first part we will focus on physiological conditions, and describe the role of histone deacetylases on the microglial epigenetic landscape, survival and homeostasis during development (M. Prinz); and how the phagocytosis of apoptotic newborn cells triggers an integrated epigenetic, transcriptional and metabolic remodelling of the microglial mitochondrial network (A. Sierra). In the second part, we will move to a major pathology, Alzheimer´s disease, and discuss the key role of TREM2 and other innate immune receptors in maintaining microglial metabolic fitness (M. Colonna); and how microglial inflammatory imprinting leads to immune training and exacerbates cerebral β-amyloidosis (J. Neher). We have a balanced gender, geographical distribution, and scientific seniority of the speakers. The chairperson has previous experience in event organization (2015 Euroglia organizer, 2017 Euroglia program committee, 2020 EMBL Microglia meeting organizer).
  • Session Time
    12:15 - 13:30
    Session Type
    Special interest event
    Session Description
    This interactive Special Interest Event allows you as FENS Forum participant to meet with representatives from business, industry and public sectors, all with a neuroscience background. The speakers will share with you how their neuroscience background contributed to their career-paths. Following this event, the speakers will be available to answer your questions in an informal setting within the Forum career and training area from 14:30-15:30. This event will be followed by the FENS Job fair from 15:30 - 17:30.
  • Session Time
    13:30 - 14:15
    Session Type
    Special Lecture
  • Session Time
    15:45 - 17:15
    Session Type
    Parallel Symposium
    Session Description
    Neuropsychiatric disorders exhibit sex differences in the age of onset, prevalence and symptomatology. The identification of the molecular pathways that contribute to the development and maintenance of neuronal dimorphic configurations will help us understand the link between sex and mental disorders. We will explore this topic from multiple angles and model organisms: The regulators that coordinate the development of sex differences in the brain in gene expression, circuit formation and behavior. Sex hormones, epigenetic and transcriptional mechanisms control the sexual differentiation of the brain in mammals, flies, and worms. C. elegans and Drosophila lack hormonal control of sexual traits, allowing us to explore the role of novel conserved genetic factors in the regulation of sex specific traits; The impact of sex determination in the configuration of neuronal networks to generate physiological and behavioral differences between the two sexes; Anatomical and functional delineation of neural circuits underlying sex-typical social behaviors and social interactions. We will overview the different structural and molecular designs that ensure that common sensory inputs elicit dimorphic behavioral outputs. We will bring together fundamental aspects in neuroscience that go beyond the neurobiology of sex in C. elegans, Drosophila and mouse nervous systems.
  • Session Time
    09:45 - 11:15
    Session Type
    Parallel Symposium
    Session Description
    Animals must learn from past experiences to guarantee survival; therefore, strong mechanisms of motivated learning have evolved. Understanding the circuit, cellular, and molecular bases of motivated learning is important to obtain insights into the etiology of anxiety and mood disorders. While the basic mechanisms of neural plasticity underlying fear memory formation and the circuit mechanisms for expressing fear memories have been explored, much less is known about the instructive signals that drive associative plasticity. In fact, exciting new advances are now being made in our understanding of how the brain transmits and encodes "teaching signals" for associative plasticity. The laboratory of Josh Johansen (Speaker #1) has identified parallel brainstem neuromodulatory and glutamatergic instructive signaling pathways to the amygdala.. Ralf Schneggenburger (Speaker #2) investigates whether the insular cortex instructs amygdalar networks during fear learning. Anna Beyeler (Speaker #3) will present evidence for a role of synaptic plasticity of insular cortex output pathways in valence coding. Finally, Andreas Lüthi (Speaker #4 concluding the Symposium) will present recent insights into the circuit level representation of teaching signals during higher order conditioning.
  • Session Time
    12:30 - 13:30
    Session Type
    Special interest event
    Session Description
    The European Research Council (ERC) is an organisation of the European Commission aimed at funding excellence in research, as part of Horizon 2020. It supports investigator-driven frontier research and stimulates scientific excellence by awarding long-term grants to individual researchers from anywhere in the world to carry out their research in a European host organisation. With 4 main granting schemes, the ERC supports researchers at different stages of their careers. The Starting Grant supports young investigators moving to independence. The Consolidator Grant strengthens recently created teams. The Advanced Grant provides to well-established scientists an opportunity to develop innovative or high-risk research. The Synergy Grant brings several teams together to jointly address complex research topics. The ERC has been very active in supporting cutting-edge and innovative research in all fields of neuroscience. Besides giving details on these different schemes and how to apply, this session will also be a unique opportunity to meet with ERC grantees presenting their project and sharing their ERC experience.
  • Session Time
    13:30 - 14:15
    Session Type
    Special Lecture
  • Session Time
    15:45 - 17:50
    Session Type
    Parallel Symposium
    Session Description
    The brain uses up to 20% of the body’s energy budget, due largely to the inordinate amount of energy needed by neurons for electrical signalling. Classically, glucose was considered the neuron’s sole energy substrate. However, evidence accrued since the 1990s, has led to a paradigm shift in our understanding of neuronal energy metabolism; one in which astrocytes and myelinating glia can supply carbon fuels in the form of lactate, to neurons for energy and signalling purposes. In this symposium, pioneers in the field will highlight current understanding, investigative methods and implications for health and disease. The objectives are to: Provide a platform for junior and senior scientists of both genders, and from different geographical locations (including Glasgow!) to showcase state-of-the-art in our understanding of this field. Make the information accessible to a broad and multidisciplinary audience, through the skills of our experienced speakers. Approach the subject and its controversies from a range of different angles and based on diverse experimental approaches, from in vitro through in vivo studies, in vertebrate and invertebrate model organisms.
  • Session Time
    09:45 - 11:15
    Session Type
    Parallel Symposium
    Session Description
    This symposium will offer a comprehensive view of how synaptic information reaches the nucleus, how activity-dependent regulation of chromatin modulates gene transcription, and how the translational regulation of newly synthesized mRNAs impacts synaptic function in both normal and pathological states. Hilmar Bading will start at the synapse to show how antagonistic signaling between synaptic and extrasynaptic NMDA receptors controls a synapse-to-nucleus signaling pathway to regulate a neuroprotective gene program. He will present data on how innovative delivery of neuroprotective gene products can attenuate neuron dysfunction in a mouse stroke model. Anne West will focus in on the nucleus and describe how she is using single molecule fluorescence in situ and dead Cas9-mediated epigenome editing to discover how chromatin regulation of transcriptional enhancers modulates the bursting dynamics of activity-inducible genes. Tae-Kyung Kim has used leading-edge genomic methods to study the BET family of acetyl-lysine binding proteins, which he will show play isoform-specific roles in coupling chromatin structure to the regulation of activity-dependent gene transcription. Finally, Claudia Bagni will return to the synapse to discuss how the FMRP-interacting protein CYFIP1 regulates synapse structure and plasticity by orchestrating actin remodeling and protein synthesis. Her work helps to explain how CYFIP1 haploinsufficiency results in neurological and psychiatric disorders.
  • Session Time
    15:45 - 17:15
    Session Type
    Parallel Symposium
    Session Description
    Sensory systems do not work in isolation but are influenced by each other. Multisensory interaction provides context to the sensory information, and acts as a platform for cross-modal plasticity when losing a sensory modality. Cross-modal and multisensory interactions are not only evident in multisensory cortical areas but are also present in the primary sensory cortices. Here, we will cover topics on how sensory experience in one domain leads to plasticity in cortical areas involved in processing the other senses, and how multisensory experience interacts to sculpt cortical circuits. Dr. Manuel Teichert will present data that a brief duration of auditory or whisker deprivation induces plasticity in the adult visual cortex (V1), such that there is recovery of ocular dominance plasticity and enhancement of visually guided behavior. Dr. Hey-Kyoung Lee follows by showing data that such enhancement of adult V1 plasticity is due to recovering thalamocortical plasticity in V1 by deafening. Dr. Patrick Kanold will discuss that visual deprivation changes the functional circuit of the primary auditory cortex (A1) to allow better feature selectivity and information processing. Dr. Tara Keck will talk about multisensory plasticity in the retrosplenial cortex (RSC), which normally responds to both auditory and visual stimuli. In RSC, deprivation of hearing or vision leads to homeostatic increases in responses to both modalities through amplification of the spontaneous network activity.
  • Session Time
    09:45 - 11:15
    Session Type
    Parallel Symposium
    Session Description
    The serotonergic system impacts many behaviors and is the most common target of psychiatric drugs. However, even though this system has been studied intensively for decades, overarching models that comprehensively describe the function(s) of serotonin are lacking. This stands in contrast to other neuromodulatory systems where strong frameworks exist, for example the reward prediction error framework for dopaminergic signaling. In this workshop, we will bring together four speakers who investigate how serotonergic circuits control the behavior of diverse animals: worms, fish, mice, and monkeys. It is our hope that this comparison over an evolutionary scale will illuminate conserved, critical roles for serotonin. There will be four seminars and reserved time for questions, discussion, and brainstorming. The four speakers bring cutting-edge approaches, such as whole-brain calcium imaging, to the study of serotonergic circuits. (1) Flavell (MIT) will discuss the role of serotonin in foraging behaviors in C. elegans, (2) Robson/Li (starting lab at Max Planck in 2019) will discuss serotonergic control of Zebrafish foraging and prey capture, (3) Warden (Cornell) will discuss serotonergic control of locomotion patterns across varying environmental contexts in mice, (4) Nienborg (Tuebingen) will discuss functions of serotonin in controlling sensory responses in primates. The lineup of speakers is balanced for gender diversity and represents institutions from Europe and the USA.
  • Session Time
    15:45 - 17:15
    Session Type
    Parallel Symposium
    Session Description
    Hyperpolarisation-activated Cyclic-Nucleotide gated (HCN) channels carry a non-selective cationic conductance, Ih, which is important for modulating neuron excitability. HCN channels are encoded by four genes (HCN1-4), each with distinct expression and biophysical profiles that are tuned to specific functions in the brain and peripheral nervous system. Recent important discoveries have focused attention on these unique channels in neurological disease. This includes finding that HCN1 pathogenic variants cause epilepsy, with severity ranging from mild to catastrophic. There is also robust experimental evidence implicating HCN2 channels in pain, motivating significant funding from pharmaceutical companies. Although less well studied, there is also growing evidence that HCN4 channels may play a role in neurological disease. In this symposium we will present the most up to date evidence linking HCN channels to neurological pathologies. Prof Depienne will talk about our understanding of HCN1 ion channels in the genetics of epilepsy. Dr Santoro will present our current understanding of HCN function and expression including novel data on epilepsy in humanised mouse models based on HCN1 mutations. Prof McNaughton will discuss how HCN2 channels have become a validated target in neuropathic pain, as well as new data indicating a critical role of this channel in migraine and tinnitus. The final talk will be by A/Prof Reid who will discuss novel insights into how HCN4 channels modulate neuronal excitability in the context of epilepsy.
  • Session Time
    09:45 - 11:15
    Session Type
    Parallel Symposium
    Session Description
    This symposium will examine the neurobiological links between poor sleep, high stress, the gut, appetite and weight gain. We have assembled the below experts to deliver the symposium. This selection is a balance of early and established investigators, males and females, representing UK, German, French, Chinese and USA nationalities. Chair: Dr Wei Ba, a Chinese neuroscientist, is an EMBO Fellow and she studies sleep circuitry and stress. Speakers: Prof. Lora Heisler, US neuroscientist now based in Scotland, will present her group’s breaking research on how brainstem and hypothalamic 5-HT circuitry interacts to promote and restrict calorie intake, stress and arousal. Dr Raphaelle Winsky-Sommerer is a French neuroscientist based at the University of Surrey. She will discuss her latest discovery of an exciting link suggesting that REM sleep protects against chronic stress and weight gain. Prof. William Wisden’s recently identified circuitry that induces both NREM sleep and body cooling and that receives inputs from satiety centres. He will present new data for how satiety, sleep and body temperature are linked. Prof. Matthias H. Tschöp will present data on new drugs that modulate gut-derived signals within the brain and thereby indirectly adjust the control of appetite and metabolism and other metabolic control organs. Some of these compounds are already in clinical trials and showing promising results.This symposium will examine the neurobiological links between poor sleep, high stress, the gut, appetite and weight gain. We have assembled the below experts to deliver the symposium. This selection is a balance of early and established investigators, males and females, representing UK, German, French, Chinese and USA nationalities. Chair: Dr Wei Ba, a Chinese neuroscientist, is an EMBO Fellow and she studies sleep circuitry and stress. Speakers: Prof. Lora Heisler, US neuroscientist now based in Scotland, will present her group’s breaking research on how brainstem and hypothalamic 5-HT circuitry interacts to promote and restrict calorie intake, stress and arousal. Dr Raphaelle Winsky-Sommerer is a French neuroscientist based at the University of Surrey. She will discuss her latest discovery of an exciting link suggesting that REM sleep protects against chronic stress and weight gain. Prof. William Wisden’s recently identified circuitry that induces both NREM sleep and body cooling and that receives inputs from satiety centres. He will present new data for how satiety, sleep and body temperature are linked. Prof. Matthias H. Tschöp will present data on new drugs that modulate gut-derived signals within the brain and thereby indirectly adjust the control of appetite and metabolism and other metabolic control organs. Some of these compounds are already in clinical trials and showing promising results.
  • Session Time
    15:45 - 17:15
    Session Type
    Parallel Symposium
    Session Description
    Combining information across our senses is key to form a coherent percept of our environment. This interdisciplinary symposium will provide an overview of the rapidly emerging field of multisensory integration by making translational connections between animal studies and functional imaging studies in humans. We will bring together experts who use a diverse set of techniques, ranging from single-unit and neural population recordings in animals to fMRI, MEG/EEG, psychophysics and computational modeling. M. Aller and Y. Cao will show that the human brain flexibly combines sensory information by dynamically encoding multiple estimates that progress in their complexity from early sensory cortex, to parietal and frontal association cortex. H. Atilgan and C. Fetsch will complement this systems level perspective with more focal electrophysiological recordings in carnivores and show how multisensory integration can be computed by populations of neurons and single neurons. Intriguingly, they also reveal integration processes in auditory cortices that are critical for auditory scene analysis. Overall these studies highlight that multisensory perception relies on computations across the cortical hierarchy ranging from limited multisensory influences in primary sensory cortices to association cortices where sensory information is flexibly combined by taking into account the world’s causal structure and current task-demands.
  • Session Time
    09:45 - 11:15
    Session Type
    Parallel Symposium
    Session Description
    The last decade has witnessed an increased interest in oxytocin as a therapeutic for mental disorders, leading to a surge in basic and clinical research on oxytocin. Several key questions have been raised regarding the basic mechanisms of oxytocin action, brain penetrance of intranasal oxytocin, clinical implications of oxytocin treatment, and the validity of animal models for human-related disorders and their use for assessing the therapeutic potential of novel treatments. This symposium, chaired by Drs. Hala Harony-Nicolas (Mount Sinai Hospital, USA) and Alexandre Charlet (CNRS, France), will host both basic and clinical scientists. Dr. Shlomo Wagner (University of Haifa, Israel) will discuss the role of oxytocin in modulating neuronal and molecular mechanisms of social recognition in rodents, including those that model autism. Dr. Wolfgang Kelsch (Heidelberg University, Germany) will talk about the role of oxytocin in social information processing in rodents’ sensory networks. Dr. Mary Lee (NIH, USA) will discuss the penetrance of exogenous oxytocin into the primate brain. Dr. Elissar Andari (Emory University, USA) will present findings from the Autism Oxytocin Brain Project on dose-dependent effects of oxytocin on behavior and functional connectivity in individuals with autism. Together, the speakers will raise provocative questions on oxytocin as a potential therapeutic and spark discussion about the feasibility of using rodent models to study human mental illnesses.
  • Session Time
    15:45 - 17:15
    Session Type
    Parallel Symposium
    Session Description
    Our symposium focuses on the neural mechanisms of social cognition across multiple brain regions in humans and non-human primates. Chang will present single-neuron and inter-regional oscillatory coupling mechanisms underlying social gaze interaction. Social gaze encoding is widely present in multiple prefrontal areas and unique neuronal coupling between the prefrontal cortex and the amygdala underlies social gaze events. Gothard will compare the role of the amygdala and the somatosensory cortices in extracting and selectively processing the social dimension of touch. While all areas examined receive and process both non-social and social touch, neural activity in the amygdala suggests strong gating mechanisms for social touch only. Lockwood will present that moral learning in humans is associated with unique neural signatures. The thalamus specifically codes a prediction error signal of pain avoidance when learning to avoid harming another person and the connectivity between the thalamus and prefrontal cortex tracks how the brain implements moral learning. Finally, Genovesio will present how the Frontal Pole, located at the apex of the frontal hierarchy, contributes to social cognition. Frontal polar neurons differentiate social and non-social agents, with a group of neurons specifically evaluating other agent’s choices, suggesting their role in high-level evaluation of social actions. All talks will emphasize the importance of multi-region computations in social cognition.
  • Session Time
    09:45 - 11:15
    Session Type
    Parallel Symposium
    Session Description
    Response inhibition is a fundamental property of executive control, as it represents a hinge of behavioral flexibility. At any moment, we need to select and perform actions whenever they are more opportune, i.e., whenever the costs associated with them are lower than their benefits. Thus, the opportunity of executing an action must be evaluated continuously as environmental conditions, or our internal states can change unpredictably, making the selected action inappropriate for achieving desired goals. In such instances, movements must be suppressed. Despite the crucial role of inhibitory control, its generation and its neural substrates are still debated and controversial. Some support the idea that inhibition depends upon a dedicated module, which corresponds to a small right-lateralized network comprising the inferior frontal gyrus, the pre-supplementary motor area, and the subthalamic nucleus. Others sustain that response inhibition is an emergent property of a larger neural network which largely overlaps with the one implementing response planning. This debate addresses a very general question; i.e., how do complex cognitive processes map onto the brain? Could executive functions be localized in specific modules or not? The answers will provide a deeper understanding of cognitive control in healthy and of psychiatric disorders characterized by the inability to control impulses such as the Obsessive–Compulsive Disorder and the Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.
  • Session Time
    15:45 - 17:15
    Session Type
    Parallel Symposium
    Session Description
    Fear and addiction-related disorders cumulatively amount to more than one third of all mental health problems according to the WHO, yet their biological underpinnings and, consequently, their best treatment options remain incompletely understood. This is partly owing to the fact that both genetic and epigenetic factors contribute to disease resilience and treatment outcome, and that conflicting treatment approaches exist. In this symposium, both basic (Milton/Silva) and clinical (Kindt/Ressler) researchers will discuss their advances that foster a better understanding of these disorders and their treatment. Kerry Ressler (US, senior speaker) will present recent efforts in predicting disease susceptibility and treatment effectiveness of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in humans from a genetic angle. Merel Kindt (NL, senior) will present clinical data on the use of propranolol to block memory reconsolidation in the context of PTSD and phobias. Controversially, Bianca Silva (CH, junior) will present pre-clinical epigenetic and engram-specific data that favor the use of reconsolidation-updating approaches to attenuate long-lasting traumatic memories. And Amy Milton (UK, junior) will present pre-clinical evidence harnessing animals’ prediction errors to favor the extinction of cocaine addiction. Together, this multi-facetted symposium is addressing a pressing need in current day societies and destined to be of broad interest to neuroscientists and psychologists alike.
  • Session Time
    19:30 - 21:00
    Session Type
    Special interest event
    Session Description
    Discover more about the history of brain sciences through a symposium organised by the FENS History Committee and hosted by the Hunterian Museum of the University of Glasgow. The symposium will highlight the exhibition of original drawings by Santiago Ramón y Cajal at the Hunterian Museum, along with works by other prominent researchers. A pioneer of modern neuroscience, Cajal's contributions to brain illustration are noteworthy not just for their scientific value but also for their artistic qualities. Contrast his work with that of other prominent scientists and discuss your impressions at an evening reception.
  • Session Time
    19:30 - 21:45
    Session Type
    Special interest event
    Session Description
    An Evening of Science Café Continuing the success of the neuroscience pub talk events for the general public @ the FENS Forum Copenhagen in 2016 and Berlin 2018, the FENS-Kavli Scholars will continue the Science Café Series in Glasgow 2020. Five venues will host ten featured talks by FENS-Kavli Scholars to inspire discussions centered around emerging topics in neuroscience with direct relevance for society. FENS Forum attendees are highly welcome to participate in these engaging discussions. Join in communicating neuroscience to the general public! Free Drinks provided to the first 30 attendees at each location!