Henriette Moll (Netherlands)

ErasmusMC Sophia Pediatrics
Prof. Dr. Henriëtte Moll is a pediatrician/epidemiologist at the Department of General Paediatrics at the Erasmus MC – Sophia Children’s Hospital, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. Her Research focus on decision making in Paediatric Emergency Care e.g. studies on triage, screening on child abuse, management and early identification of serious infections in the febrile child. She participates in several international research consortia: European MTS group, EUSEM-REPEM, PERFORM and DIAMONDS. She published more than 400 peer reviewed papers and trained more than 30 PhD students. She founded pediatric emergency medicine in the Netherlands

Author Of 2 Presentations

Clinical Prediction Tools for Serious Bacterial Infections in the Emergency Care

Date
Wed, 11.05.2022
Session Time
15:40 - 17:15
Session Type
Parallel Symposium
Room
DIMITRIS MITROPOULOS HALL
Lecture Time
15:42 - 16:07

GUIDELINE ADHERENCE IN FEBRILE CHILDREN BELOW THREE MONTHS VISITING EUROPEAN EMERGENCY DEPARTMENTS: AN OBSERVATIONAL MULTICENTER STUDY

Date
Wed, 11.05.2022
Session Time
15:40 - 17:15
Session Type
Parallel Symposium
Room
DIMITRIS MITROPOULOS HALL
Lecture Time
16:45 - 16:53

Abstract

Backgrounds:

Febrile children below three months have a higher risk of serious bacterial infections, which often leads to extensive diagnostics and treatment. However, there is practice variation in management due to differences in guidelines and the usage and adherence. We aimed to assess whether management in febrile children below three months attending European Emergency Departments (EDs) was according to the available guidelines for fever.

Methods

This study is part of the MOFICHE study, which is an observational multicenter study including routine data of febrile children (0-18 years) attending twelve European EDs. In febrile children <3 months (excluding bronchiolitis), we analyzed actual management compared to the available guidelines for fever. Ten EDs applied the (adapted) NICE guideline and two EDs applied local guidelines. Management included diagnostic tests, antibiotic treatment and admission. Subgroup analyses in children <1 month and 1-3 months were performed. Data on follow-up was not collected.

Results:

We included 913 children (median age 1.7 months) with the majority triaged as intermediate/high urgent (53%), 40% having a respiratory tract infection and 56% having a viral illness. Management per ED varied: diagnostic tests 14-83%, antibiotic treatment 23-54%, admission 34-86%. Adherence to the guidelines varied: blood cultures were obtained in 43% (374/868), lumbar punctures in 30% (144/488), antibiotics were prescribed in 55% (270/492) and 67% (573/859) were admitted. Full adherence to all these four components occurred in 15% (132/868, range 0-38%), 31% (71/223) in children <1 month and 10% (61/645) in children 1-3 months respectively.

Conclusions/Learning Points:

There is large practice variation in management and guideline adherence was limited, but highest for admission which implies good safety netting. Future studies should focus on guideline revision with new biomarkers in order to optimize management in young febrile children.

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Presenter Of 1 Presentation

Clinical Prediction Tools for Serious Bacterial Infections in the Emergency Care

Date
Wed, 11.05.2022
Session Time
15:40 - 17:15
Session Type
Parallel Symposium
Room
DIMITRIS MITROPOULOS HALL
Lecture Time
15:42 - 16:07