Nora Fritschi (Switzerland)

University children hospital Basel Mycobacterial research
Dr Nora Fritschi is paediatrician in training and PhD candidate in clinical research at the Children’s University Hospital Basel and Department of Clinical Research at the University Basel, Switzerland. For her PhD, she is working on novel diagnostic test for tuberculosis in children and on epidemiological studies of tuberculosis in children in Switzerland.

Author Of 2 Presentations

Research Pitch: Monocyte-To-Lymphocyte and Neutrophil-To-Lymphocyte Ratio as Diagnostic Markers for TB Disease in Children

Date
Thu, 12.05.2022
Session Time
14:00 - 15:30
Session Type
Research Sessions
Room
BANQUETING HALL
Lecture Time
15:05 - 15:10

DIAGNOSTIC PERFORMANCE IN A MULTICENTRE STUDY USING FULL BLOOD COUNTS FOR THE NEUTROPHIL-TO-LYMPHOCYTE AND MONOCYTE-TO-LYMPHOCYTE RATIO FOR THE DIAGNOSIS OF PAEDIATRIC TUBERCULOSIS

Date
Fri, 13.05.2022
Session Time
10:00 - 11:30
Session Type
Oral Presentations Session
Room
MC 2 HALL
Lecture Time
11:12 - 11:22

Abstract

Backgrounds:

The monocyte-to-lymphocyte ratio (MLR) and neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) are easy to obtain markers from full blood counts. Little is known about the diagnostic accuracy of these ratios in children evaluated for tuberculosis (TB) compared to sick controls.

Methods

Data of two prospective multicentre studies in Switzerland were used: the CITRUS study and the ProPAED study. The CITRUS study included children <18 years with TB exposure (TB-E), TB infection (TB-I) or TB disease (TB-D). The ProPAED study included children 1 month to 18 years of age with fever and lower respiratory tract infection (viral or bacterial) and these were the sick controls (SC).

Results:

A total of 379 children were included in this analysis; 19 with TB-D, 12 with TB-I, 24 TB-E and 324 SC. Median age was 3.08 (IQR [1.37, 6.06]) years and 58% were male. Median NLR was highest in TB-D (2.05 [1.41, 2.64]) and significantly higher compared to children with TB-I (1.08 [0.82, 1.55]), TB-E (0.80 [0.63, 1.33]) and SC (0.31 [0.11, 0.97]) (all p-values < 0.05). Median MLR was similar in TB-D (0.25 [0.18, 0.34]) and SC (0.34 [0.21, 0.58]), but significantly higher in TB-D and TB-I when compared to TB-E (both p-values <0.05). Receiver operating characteristic curves of the ratios were calculated for children with TB-D and SC. NLR and MLR had at cut-off 0.75 and 0.63, an area under the curve of 0.84 and 0.63, sensitivity of 0.94 and 0.94, and specificity of 0.7 and 0.3, respectively. Similar results were obtained after adjustment for age.

espid_abstract_figure1_v2.png

Conclusions/Learning Points:

This study shows that NLR and MLR are promising easy-to-obtain diagnostic markers to differentiate children TB-D from non-TB lower respiratory tract infections. These results require confirmation in a larger study sample.

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Presenter Of 2 Presentations

Research Pitch: Monocyte-To-Lymphocyte and Neutrophil-To-Lymphocyte Ratio as Diagnostic Markers for TB Disease in Children

Date
Thu, 12.05.2022
Session Time
14:00 - 15:30
Session Type
Research Sessions
Room
BANQUETING HALL
Lecture Time
15:05 - 15:10

DIAGNOSTIC PERFORMANCE IN A MULTICENTRE STUDY USING FULL BLOOD COUNTS FOR THE NEUTROPHIL-TO-LYMPHOCYTE AND MONOCYTE-TO-LYMPHOCYTE RATIO FOR THE DIAGNOSIS OF PAEDIATRIC TUBERCULOSIS

Date
Fri, 13.05.2022
Session Time
10:00 - 11:30
Session Type
Oral Presentations Session
Room
MC 2 HALL
Lecture Time
11:12 - 11:22

Abstract

Backgrounds:

The monocyte-to-lymphocyte ratio (MLR) and neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) are easy to obtain markers from full blood counts. Little is known about the diagnostic accuracy of these ratios in children evaluated for tuberculosis (TB) compared to sick controls.

Methods

Data of two prospective multicentre studies in Switzerland were used: the CITRUS study and the ProPAED study. The CITRUS study included children <18 years with TB exposure (TB-E), TB infection (TB-I) or TB disease (TB-D). The ProPAED study included children 1 month to 18 years of age with fever and lower respiratory tract infection (viral or bacterial) and these were the sick controls (SC).

Results:

A total of 379 children were included in this analysis; 19 with TB-D, 12 with TB-I, 24 TB-E and 324 SC. Median age was 3.08 (IQR [1.37, 6.06]) years and 58% were male. Median NLR was highest in TB-D (2.05 [1.41, 2.64]) and significantly higher compared to children with TB-I (1.08 [0.82, 1.55]), TB-E (0.80 [0.63, 1.33]) and SC (0.31 [0.11, 0.97]) (all p-values < 0.05). Median MLR was similar in TB-D (0.25 [0.18, 0.34]) and SC (0.34 [0.21, 0.58]), but significantly higher in TB-D and TB-I when compared to TB-E (both p-values <0.05). Receiver operating characteristic curves of the ratios were calculated for children with TB-D and SC. NLR and MLR had at cut-off 0.75 and 0.63, an area under the curve of 0.84 and 0.63, sensitivity of 0.94 and 0.94, and specificity of 0.7 and 0.3, respectively. Similar results were obtained after adjustment for age.

espid_abstract_figure1_v2.png

Conclusions/Learning Points:

This study shows that NLR and MLR are promising easy-to-obtain diagnostic markers to differentiate children TB-D from non-TB lower respiratory tract infections. These results require confirmation in a larger study sample.

Hide