Emmanuel Roilides (Greece)

Aristotle University School of Medicine Infectious Diseases Unit and Research Laboratory
Emmanuel Roilides, MD, PhD, FIDSA, FAAM, FESCMID, FECMM, FISAC is Professor of Paediatrics-Infectious Diseases in Aristotle University School of Medicine at Hippokration Hospital in Thessaloniki, Greece. He received his MD and PhD from the University of Athens, Greece, and worked for seven years at NIH Maryland, USA. Since 1993, Professor Roilides has been a faculty member in the Aristotle University. He currently directs the research laboratory and the Division of Infectious Diseases and chairs the 3rd Department of Pediatrics. He is Board member of Special Unit for Biomedical Research and Education of the School of Medicine responsible for Basic and Translational Research. His research focuses on fungal infections and multi-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. He is on the Editorial Board of several international biomedical journals and author of >650 peer reviewed articles and book chapters (>450 PUBMED). He has been co-ordinator or partner in several multicentre or multinational studies.

Author Of 7 Presentations

Expert

Date
Wed, 11.05.2022
Session Time
07:00 - 07:50
Session Type
Meet The Experts
Room
MC 2 HALL
Lecture Time
07:00 - 07:00

Welcome and Introduction

Date
Wed, 11.05.2022
Session Time
11:10 - 12:40
Session Type
Research Sessions
Room
NIKOS SKALKOTAS HALL
Lecture Time
11:10 - 11:15

Welcome and introduction

Date
Mon, 09.05.2022
Session Time
17:15 - 18:45
Session Type
Sponsored Symposium
Room
ALEXANDRA TRIANTI HALL
Lecture Time
17:15 - 17:25

CHARACTERISTICS OF CHILDREN HOSPITALIZED WITH MIS-C DURING THREE PANDEMIC WAVES IN GREECE

Date
Wed, 11.05.2022
Session Time
13:40 - 15:10
Session Type
Joint Symposium
Room
BANQUETING HALL
Lecture Time
14:50 - 14:58

Abstract

Backgrounds:

The Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C) is a rare but potentially severe complication of COVID-19.

Methods

This is a retrospective observational study of children aged <18 years hospitalized with MIS-C in 10 tertiary hospitals in Greece during three pandemic waves characterized by different SARS-CoV-2 variant: i. from August 2020 to January 2021 (EU1-B.1.177), ii. from February 2021 to July 2021 (Alpha-B.1.1.7) and iii. from August 2021 to December 2021 (Delta-B.1.617.2). The aim of the study was to document the incidence over time, clinical characteristics and outcome of children admitted with MIS-C in Greek hospitals during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Results:

table 1.jpg

In total, 119 patients were included, 91.6% (109/119) met the WHO criteria of MIS-C diagnosis: 26.9% (32/119), 39.5% (47/119) and 33.6% (40/119) were hospitalized during the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd study period, respectively. Demographic and clinical characteristics are shown in Table 1. No cases were found before October 2020. The incidence of MIS-C significantly decreased over the three waves from 3.3/1000 to 0.25/1000 confirmed COVID-19 cases (P <0.0001). No other significant difference was observed in the clinical manifestations and disease severity of children hospitalized with MIS-C over the three waves.

Conclusions/Learning Points:

This study indicates that the incidence of MIS-C may vary according to the predominant variant. Outcome remains favourable regardless of the variant leading to MIS-C. Larger studies are needed to clarify if clinical characteristics and/or disease severity may differ, as well.

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PATTERNS AND TRENDS OF ANTIBACTERIAL AND ANTIFUNGAL USE IN A PEDIATRIC ONCOLOGY DEPARTMENT

Date
Thu, 12.05.2022
Session Time
10:00 - 11:30
Session Type
Oral Presentations Session
Room
MC 2 HALL
Lecture Time
11:02 - 11:12

Abstract

Backgrounds:

Monitoring of antibacterial and antifungal use is essential for antimicrobial stewardship strategies. We studied patterns and time trends of antibacterial and antifungal use in a pediatric oncology department.

Methods

A retrospective analysis of monthly antibacterial and antifungal use was conducted in a 20-bed pediatric oncology department of a tertiary-level hospital from January 2018 to May 2020 (29 months). Data of antimicrobial and antifungal consumption was obtained from the hospital pharmacy and expressed as defined daily doses per 100 bed-days (DDD/100BD). Number of bed-days was obtained from Hospital Office of Statistics.

Results:

During study period there was a median monthly rate of 301 bed-days. Total consumption of antibacterials had a median monthly rate of 108 DDD/100BD and of antifungals 94 DDD/100BD showing significant increases (p=0.015 and p<0.001, respectively). Glycopeptides (vancomycin/teicoplanin) constituted the most common used antibacterial class (29.5 DDD/100BD). Carbapenems were the second most used antibacterial agents (15.2 DDD/100BD) with a significant increase (p=0.009). Consumption of aminoglycosides and combination of piperacillin with tazobactam followed with 13.8 DDD/100BD and 11.7 DDD/100BD, respectively. Consumption of cotrimoxazole was 9.3 DDD/100BD, followed by metronidazole (6.4 DDD/100BD), colistin (4 DDD/100BD) and quinolones (3.8 DDD/100BD). Utilization of 3rd generation cephalosporins was relatively low (3.7 DDD/100BD). Voriconazole constituted the most common used antifungal agent (45 DOT/100BD). Micafungin was the second most commonly used antifungal agent (18 DOT/100BD) with a significant increase (p=0.028).

Conclusions/Learning Points:

High consumption of glycopeptides and carbapenems combined by constant use of colistin is of concern. Emergence of antimicrobial resistance in pediatric oncology patients could explain this pattern. High voriconazole and micafungin use mainly reflects antifungal prophylaxis practices. These results may guide antimicrobial and antifungal stewardship activities.

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ANTIFUNGAL USE IN EUROPEAN PEDIATRIC INTENSIVE CARE UNITS (PICUS): A 12-WEEK MULTICENTER MODIFIED POINT PREVALENCE STUDY (CALYPSO)

Date
Thu, 12.05.2022
Session Time
08:00 - 09:30
Session Type
Parallel Symposium
Room
MC 2 HALL
Lecture Time
09:07 - 09:17

Abstract

Backgrounds:

Knowledge of antifungal use in PICUs across Europe, while frequently prescribed, is limited. A 12-wk modified point-prevalence study was conducted to record antifungal use in Εuropean PICUs.

Methods

All patients hospitalized in the participating PICUs and receiving systemic antifungals were included. Information about ward demographics was collected once at the beginning; weekly ward and patient data were collected prospectively for the 12-wk study period and entered in REDCap database.

Results:

table 1.antifungal agents in picus.png

18 PICUs (15 hospitals), in 10 European countries participated. 8/18 (44%) of PICUs followed prophylactic practices for patients with immunocompromise/neutropenia, long-term parenteral nutrition or central lines, 7/18 (39%) had an antifungal stewardship program implemented and the majority (16/18) used biomarkers (15/16 galactomannan, 12/16 each beta-D-glucan and Cryptococcal antigen). 101 patients with ages ≤90d (14 patients), 3-60mo (44pts) and >5yrs (43pts) were recorded. Malignancy was the most common underlying condition among patients aged >90d (28%) followed by surgery/trauma (25%), whereas all patients ≤90d had previous surgery. Indication for antifungal prescribing was prophylaxis in 38% and treatment in 62% [empirical (57%), preemptive (13%) and targeted (30%)]. Fluconazole was the most common agent both for prophylaxis [45%, median dose: 6 (range 2-9) mg/kg/d] and empirical treatment [53%, median dose: 10 (range 1-12) mg/kg/d], whereas LAMB was the most frequent agent for targeted treatment [37%, median dose: 5 (range 3-6) mg/kg/d] (Table 1). Common reasons for empirical and targeted treatment were persistent fever in high-risk patients (58%) and candidiasis (100%), respectively. For targeted treatment, the most frequent pathogens were Candida albicans (37%) and Candida parapsilosis (32%).

Conclusions/Learning Points:

The majority of antifungal prescriptions across European PICUs were for prophylaxis or empirical treatment. These data will be valueable for guiding antifungal stewardship strategies in PICUs

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Presenter Of 4 Presentations

Welcome and introduction

Date
Mon, 09.05.2022
Session Time
17:15 - 18:45
Session Type
Sponsored Symposium
Room
ALEXANDRA TRIANTI HALL
Lecture Time
17:15 - 17:25

Expert

Date
Wed, 11.05.2022
Session Time
07:00 - 07:50
Session Type
Meet The Experts
Room
MC 2 HALL
Lecture Time
07:00 - 07:00

Welcome and Introduction

Date
Wed, 11.05.2022
Session Time
11:10 - 12:40
Session Type
Research Sessions
Room
NIKOS SKALKOTAS HALL
Lecture Time
11:10 - 11:15

Moderator Of 4 Sessions

Session Type
Sponsored Symposium
Date
Mon, 09.05.2022
Session Time
17:15 - 18:45
Room
ALEXANDRA TRIANTI HALL
Session Description
Optimizing prevention of noninvasive pneumococcal disease in children: implications for new pneumococcal vaccines – Supported by MSD.

Session Description:

This symposium will focus on the epidemiology and public health impact of noninvasive pneumococcal disease in children and considerations to optimize prevention with the introduction of new pneumococcal conjugate vaccines.

Session Type
Parallel Symposium
Date
Wed, 11.05.2022
Session Time
13:40 - 15:10
Room
MC 2 HALL
Session Type
Joint Symposium
Date
Thu, 12.05.2022
Session Time
08:00 - 09:30
Room
ALEXANDRA TRIANTI HALL

Facilitator Of

Session Type
Sponsored Symposium
Date
Mon, 09.05.2022
Session Time
17:15 - 18:45
Room
ALEXANDRA TRIANTI HALL
Session Description
Optimizing prevention of noninvasive pneumococcal disease in children: implications for new pneumococcal vaccines – Supported by MSD.

Session Description:

This symposium will focus on the epidemiology and public health impact of noninvasive pneumococcal disease in children and considerations to optimize prevention with the introduction of new pneumococcal conjugate vaccines.