Browsing Over 3689 Presentations

EONS 12: Opening session EONS session

CN68 - Genetics, biomarkers and symptoms during breast cancer: A scoping review of literature (ID 4921)

Presentation Number
CN68
Lecture Time
09:20 - 09:35
Speakers
  • Seyma I. Pasalak (Istanbul, Turkey)
Location
Oviedo Auditorium (CC5), Fira Gran Via, Barcelona, Spain
Date
28.09.2019
Time
08:30 - 10:00

Abstract

Background

Current evidence suggests that sensitive and specific biomarkers will be available to be used for the assessment and management of symptoms. The aims of the study; to explore the existing research evidence pertaining to biomarkers’/genes’ investigation within breast cancer symptom science, and to identify biomarkers to be targeted in future symptom research intervention among breast cancer patients.

Methods

Search terms for this systematic review, included “biomarker*, biological marker*, genetics, genomics, genes, genotype, phenotype, AND oncology, cancer, neoplasm, AND sign*, symptom*, quality of life, cognitive functions/performance or cognitive impairment, sleep disturbances, impaired sleep/insomnia, fatique, pain, GI distress, nausea, vomiting, appetite changes, weight loss, neuropathy, xerostomia and mouth ulcers, neuropathy, skin and nail changes, dyspnea, depression, anxiety”. A comprehensive multistep search of CINAHL (160), Cochrane (41), OVID (18), PsycInfo (59), Pubmed (773), Web of Science (527) for identified articles to include in February 2019. Total 1573 articles found and after discarding the duplicates, 1301 articles were checked by title then abstract. A sample of 114 primary research articles were remained for full text review. Total 55 articles met the inclusion criteria in the review.

Results

Twenty-three articles in different cancer types including breast cancer and 32 articles including only breast cancer patients were reviewed in details. The reference lists of these articles will be checked to find additional studies for scoping reviews. These studies were summarized using the following pre-specified evaluation criteria: the aim of study, major findings; genes and associated polymorphisms investigated, sample characteristics (i.e., size, setting, age); symptom’s assessment (i.e., timing). Symptoms investigated are sleep disturbances, anxiety, cognitive function (attentional function, memory complaints), peripheral neuropathy- neurotoxicity, depressive symptoms, fatigue- energy level, nausea-vomiting, pain (cancer pain, breast pain), quality of life, secondary lymphedema.

Conclusions

In future, candidate genes may be targeted to describe mechanisms of symptoms or symptoms clusters for potential precision treatments and effective symptom management strategies.

Legal entity responsible for the study

The authors.

Funding

Has not received any funding.

Disclosure

All authors have declared no conflicts of interest.

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EONS 12: Opening session EONS session

CN45 - The cost of survival study: A mixed methods exploration of quality of life outcomes in colorectal cancer survivorship (ID 2922)

Presentation Number
CN45
Lecture Time
09:35 - 09:50
Speakers
  • Amanda Drury (Dublin, Ireland)
Location
Oviedo Auditorium (CC5), Fira Gran Via, Barcelona, Spain
Date
28.09.2019
Time
08:30 - 10:00

Abstract

Background

Cancer survivors may live with an array of physical, psychological and social disabilities which impact their day-to-day lives. The literature exploring quality of life in cancer survivorship is predominantly quantitative in nature; with inconsistencies in symptom prevalence owing to the multiplicity of generic and disease-specific quality of life instruments. This study explores the quality of life outcomes and symptom experiences of colorectal cancer survivors using a mixed methods sequential explanatory research design.

Methods

A purposive sample of adult colorectal cancer survivors between six and 60 months post-diagnosis (n = 304) were recruited from three public and private hospitals and 21 cancer support centres in Ireland. Participants completed a cross-sectional questionnaire; quality of life was evaluated using the EuroQol and FACT-C questionnaires. A sub-sample of 22 survey participants selected using a maximum variety sampling strategy took part in semi-structured interviews to explore their quality of life and symptom experiences in greater depth.

Results

Quality of life scores reported by the sample were postive on average; however, more than half were dissatisfied with their quality of life, and more than three-quarters reported at least one physical, psychological or social survivorship issue. Negative body image (74%), sexual dysfunction (66%) and fatigue (64%) were the most common issues reported by survey participants. However, qualitative data suggest that less prevalent symptoms such as bowel dysfunction (28-57%) and peripheral neuropathy (47%) were associated with higher levels of unmet need and greatest distress, as they had the greatest potential to negatively impact social and psychological well-being.

Conclusions

The findings of this study demonstrate that although cancer survivors report positive quality of life outcomes, many may experience distressing physical, psychological and social effects. Given the finding that survivors associated greater unmet need and symptom-related distress with less common symptoms, it is imperative cancer survivors receive information and support that is based upon holistic person-centred evidence.

Legal entity responsible for the study

Amanda Drury.

Funding

Health Research Board.

Disclosure

All authors have declared no conflicts of interest.

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EONS 12: Closing session EONS session

Novice Research Dissemination Award #1: CART-19: a comparative between literature versus experience (ID 7334)

Lecture Time
16:00 - 16:15
Speakers
  • Cassandra I. Andersson Vila (Barcelona, Spain)
Location
Oviedo Auditorium (CC5), Fira Gran Via, Barcelona, Spain
Date
30.09.2019
Time
15:45 - 17:15
EONS 12: Closing session EONS session

Novice Research Dissemination Award #2: Exploring needs for palliative care and quality of life for oncology patients with advanced disease who undergo radiotherapy (ID 7335)

Lecture Time
16:15 - 16:30
Speakers
  • Foteini Antonopoulou (Marousi, Greece)
Location
Oviedo Auditorium (CC5), Fira Gran Via, Barcelona, Spain
Date
30.09.2019
Time
15:45 - 17:15
EONS 12: Closing session EONS session

ECND 2019 Competetion Award 1-Best Event (ID 7336)

Lecture Time
16:45 - 16:50
Speakers
  • Andrea Salamon (-, Hungary)
Location
Oviedo Auditorium (CC5), Fira Gran Via, Barcelona, Spain
Date
30.09.2019
Time
15:45 - 17:15
EONS 12: Closing session EONS session

Best Poster Award (ID 7338)

Lecture Time
16:55 - 17:00
Location
Oviedo Auditorium (CC5), Fira Gran Via, Barcelona, Spain
Date
30.09.2019
Time
15:45 - 17:15
EONS 12: Closing session EONS session

Best Poster Award (ID 7339)

Lecture Time
17:00 - 17:05
Location
Oviedo Auditorium (CC5), Fira Gran Via, Barcelona, Spain
Date
30.09.2019
Time
15:45 - 17:15
EONS 12: Patient safety in cancer care EONS session

CN31 - Adverse events in oncology and haemato-oncology inpatients of Swiss hospitals: A descriptive study (ID 3950)

Presentation Number
CN31
Lecture Time
11:00 - 11:15
Speakers
  • Anne Gerber (Lausanne, Switzerland)
Location
Oviedo Auditorium (CC5), Fira Gran Via, Barcelona, Spain
Date
28.09.2019
Time
10:15 - 11:45

Abstract

Background

The occurrence rate of adverse events (AEs) in hospitalised cancer patients in Switzerland remains unknown. The Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) Global Trigger Tool (GTT) is among the most used methods to identify AEs. However, the GTT lacks oncology-specific triggers. Therefore, we developed a GTT-based Swiss Oncology Trigger Tool (SOTT), which included two modified GTT modules (“Cares” and “Medication”) and a new “Oncology” module. Objective We applied the SOTT to describe the occurrence rate, nature, level of harm and preventability of AEs reported in health records of four Swiss inpatient oncology and haemato-oncology units.

Methods

We reviewed records of discharged patients over a 6-week period using the method recommended by the IHI for the GTT. To identify documented AEs, two nurse reviewers analysed records using the SOTT. Identified AEs were subsequently validated by physician reviewers, and those occurring during hospitalisation were classified regarding the incurred level of harm and their preventability.

Results

We reviewed 224 records, 150 for oncology and 74 for haemato-oncology. Ninety-four of them (42%) contained at least one AE. In total we identified 169 AEs 100 for oncology and 69 haemato-oncology. Overall, we calculated a rate of 76 AEs/100 admissions and 108 AEs/1000 patients-days. “Pain related to care” was the most frequent AE reported (n = 29), followed by “Constipation” (n = 17) and “Anaemia” (n = 9). Most AEs were categorized as having caused temporary harm, either requiring an intervention (n = 98) or prolonging the hospital stay (n = 25). Two required an intervention to sustain the patient’s life. Exactly 78/125 (61%) were considered non-preventable, 28/125 (22%) preventable and 19/125(15%) undetermined.

Conclusions

This is the first Swiss study to identify and categorise AEs in the oncology setting. The application of the SOTT showed a relatively high rate of harm related to care, but only 22% were considered as preventable. The description of AEs with the SOTT might be an opportunity to prioritize the development of novel interventions to avoid or limit the impact of AEs on cancer patients’ lives.

Legal entity responsible for the study

Manuela Eicher.

Funding

Has not received any funding.

Disclosure

All authors have declared no conflicts of interest.

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EONS 12: Patient safety in cancer care EONS session

CN32 - Safe administration of 5-fluorouracil with elastomeric pumps (ID 1883)

Presentation Number
CN32
Lecture Time
11:15 - 11:30
Speakers
  • Paul Sessink (Bohus-Björkö, Sweden)
Location
Oviedo Auditorium (CC5), Fira Gran Via, Barcelona, Spain
Date
28.09.2019
Time
10:15 - 11:45

Abstract

Background

Occupational exposure to cytotoxic drugs may cause adverse health effects. Nurses administrating cytotoxic drugs may face exposure risk when disconnecting infusion lines especially with elastomeric pumps as they are frequently disconnected during an infusion period of several days.

Methods

Potential contamination when disconnecting infusion lines of elastomeric pumps containing 5-fluorouracil was monitored. Three different connections were evaluated: 1) Luer Lock Male + Female 2) Luer Lock Male + Needleless connector (BD-Q-Syte®) 3) QimoMale® + QimoFemale® The evaluation was performed on a tissue mimicking patient’s arm. During disconnection, potential leakage will contaminate the tissue and the gloves used for personal protection. After disconnection, both end parts of the connection were cleaned with a wipe. The wipe, the pair of gloves, and the tissue were analysed separately for contamination with 5-fluorouracil usingLC-MSMS. Ten elastomeric pumps (Baxter-Folfusor®) were used for each type of connection. All disconnections were performed by one trained nurse after about 40 hrs of infusion.

Results

Contamination with 5-fluorouracil is found for all thirty pumps but the level of contamination differs a lot. The highest contamination is measured for the wipes (end parts). Contamination on the tissues and on the gloves is substantially lower. For the wipes, a significant difference is found between the three connections (p = 0.007). Median contamination is 50% lower for connection 3 (76 μg; p = 0.013) compared to connection 1 (152 μg) and 44% lower compared to connection 2 (135 μg; p = 0.031). There is no difference in contamination between the connections 1 and 2.

Conclusions

1) The lowest contamination with 5-fluorouracil is found for connection 3. 2) Contamination with 5-fluorouracil does not differ between the connections 1 and 2. 3) The presence of 5-fluorouracil on the gloves supports the need of wearing gloves to protect nurses from exposure by skin contact during administration of cytotoxic drugs.

Legal entity responsible for the study

Exposure Control Sweden AB.

Funding

Vygon SA, Ecouen, France.

Disclosure

All authors have declared no conflicts of interest.

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EONS 12: Creating a safety culture in cancer care EONS session

CN33 - Patient safety and the power of nursing presence (ID 3520)

Presentation Number
CN33
Lecture Time
15:00 - 15:15
Speakers
  • Laura Fennimore (Pittsburgh, United States of America)
Location
Oviedo Auditorium (CC5), Fira Gran Via, Barcelona, Spain
Date
30.09.2019
Time
14:00 - 15:30

Abstract

Background

The goal of patient safety is to reduce and eliminate preventable harm resulting from processes of care including the safe delivery of medication. Patient and occupational safety challenges are increasing in cancer care with the expanded use of oral chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and other novel treatments. In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration approved 59 novel drugs in 2018 including 19 applications of new cancer drugs and biologics as well as 38 supplemental indications and four biosimilars. Many of these novel agents will be delivered in settings that may not include the presence of a cancer nurse. Presence is a fundamental concept of nursing practice that involves active listening to facilitate understanding and meaningful connection between the patient and family and other members of the healthcare team. The safe delivery of cancer treatment is a critical component of the EONS Cancer Nursing Education Framework which defines the pivotal role of the presence of the cancer nurse in educating patients and caregivers about the safe use of cancer and symptom management medications, early recognition of side effects, and appropriate self-management approaches. As cancer care moves from traditional settings of the hospital, ambulatory clinic, or oncology provider’s office, nurses will be confronted with the need to redefine nursing presence in an era of increasingly complex healthcare delivery systems.

Methods

A literature search will be presented drawn from a review of PubMed, CINAHL, and EBSCO data bases using search terms related to “patient safety”, “nursing presence”, “vigilance”, and “medication safety”.

Results

Not applicable.

Conclusions

This presentation will explore current literature related to the role of presence of the cancer nurse in safeguarding patient outcomes and quality cancer care. The session will include discussion and recommendations to increase the effective use of nursing presence and intentional communication by cancer nurses in diverse settings.

Legal entity responsible for the study

The author.

Funding

Has not received any funding.

Disclosure

The author has declared no conflicts of interest.

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EONS 12: Living with and beyond cancer EONS session

CN46 - HIV positive and treated for cancer: A qualitative study exploring the experiences of HIV related stigma in the cancer clinical setting (ID 5343)

Presentation Number
CN46
Lecture Time
14:50 - 15:05
Speakers
  • Emma Hainsworth (London, United Kingdom)
Location
Oviedo Auditorium (CC5), Fira Gran Via, Barcelona, Spain
Date
28.09.2019
Time
14:00 - 15:30

Abstract

Background

An increasing number of people living with HIV are living longer and experiencing a dual diagnosis of HIV and cancer. Little is known of their experience and quality of care. Here we present the findings of a study exploring patient experiences of cancer care, with a focus on the impact of HIV related stigma in the cancer clinical setting.

Methods

An interpretive approach, utilising qualitative research methods was adopted to explore the complexity of experiences. Thematic analysis of participant narratives provided in longitudinal, semi-structured interviews with 17 people, recruited from three London sites between 2015 and 2017. Focused ethnography comprising 27 hours of participant observation and seven semi-structured interviews with healthcare professionals.

Results

Both HIV and cancer have a powerful, combined impact on individuals with a dual diagnosis; in cancer the impact is visible; in HIV it is generally hidden. Patients reported feeling a sense of difference within cancer services. The combination of marginalising features such as age, ethnicity and sexuality with reported experiences such as exclusion from clinical trials, extra infection control precautions and tensions about the involvement of the GP led to a powerful felt stigma. Inadequate knowledge about HIV amongst healthcare staff who were unfamiliar with the latest changes in the HIV field led to patients feeling isolated and dependent on their own resources to navigate care. The management of information relating to HIV status was experienced as an additional emotional burden on top of a physically debilitating and disruptive cancer diagnosis. Issues around disclosure were often framed by healthcare professionals as inconvenient and potentially unsafe, but they did not always demonstrate empathy for the potentially devastating implications for those patients for whom secrecy was integral to continued social support.

Conclusions

Dual diagnosis of cancer and HIV can have a profound and negative effect on patients’ experiences and potentially outcomes. Improvement depends on interventions that acknowledge the shared social narrative and impact of HIV-related stigma so that this burden is not carried by the patient alone.

Legal entity responsible for the study

UCL.

Funding

Has not received any funding.

Disclosure

All authors have declared no conflicts of interest.

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EONS 12: Palliative care EONS session

CN47 - Young people’s experiences when active cancer treatment ends (ID 5497)

Presentation Number
CN47
Lecture Time
10:00 - 10:15
Speakers
  • Sarah Lea (London, United Kingdom)
Location
Oviedo Auditorium (CC5), Fira Gran Via, Barcelona, Spain
Date
30.09.2019
Time
09:15 - 10:45

Abstract

Background

The end of active treatment is known to be a period of high stress in young people’s cancer timeline but little is known about young people’s experiences in this transition phase. This study aimed to understand the experiences and needs of young people at the end of treatment (EoT), how these are currently being met, and how best to provide support to young people.

Methods

This was a multi-stage, mixed methods study, conducted from January to December 2018, exploring the EoT experience from the perspectives of young people and healthcare professionals caring for them. This paper reports on the EoT experiences of young people (n = 11), all within 12 months of EoT, who participated in semi-structured telephone or face-to-face interviews. Interviews were transcribed and analysed using thematic analysis.

Results

Three key themes emerged from the data relating to young people’s experience of ending active treatment: 1) Challenges with social reintegration; 2) Expectations versus the reality of ending treatment; 3) Sudden loss of the safe “bubble” of treatment. Some young people reported feeling isolated from their peers after they finished treatment, feeling they no longer belonged to previous peer groups. Young people reported challenges in managing both their own expectations and expectations of others about how they would feel at the end of treatment, versus the reality of how they actually felt both physically and psychosocially. They did not expect to experience onerous ongoing physical issues including pain, nausea and fatigue. Additionally, young people experienced a range of conflicting emotions: excitement, happiness, nerves, fear, shock, surprise and uncertainty. They described realising they were no longer regularly surrounded by healthcare professionals, and feared the loss of the familiar routine of regular hospital visits.

Conclusions

End of treatment is a transition that results in changed relationships, routines, assumptions and roles. Young people often lacked awareness of and were under prepared for this. Having a better understanding of the unpredictable and ongoing nature of both physical and psychosocial issues they may face at the EoT would be beneficial, as would reassurance that challenges during this transition period are both acceptable and expected.

Legal entity responsible for the study

University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust.

Funding

Teenage Cancer Trust.

Disclosure

All authors have declared no conflicts of interest.

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