Andrew Symes, United Kingdom

Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust Immunology

Presenter Of 1 Presentation

E-Poster Discussion INGID

PATIENT-REPORTED QUALITY OF LIFE (QOL) FOLLOWING EXPERIENCE OF MANUAL PUSH METHOD WITH SUBCUTANEOUS IMMUNOGLOBULIN (SCIG) ADMINISTRATION IN PATIENTS WITH PRIMARY OR SECONDARY IMMUNODEFICIENCY

Lecture Time
14:00 - 14:10
Room
Station 3
Date
20.09.2019, Friday
Session Time
13:15 - 14:15
Board Number
216
Presentation Topic
INGID

Abstract

Background and Aims

Subcutaneous immunoglobulin (SCIg) is common among patients with primary or secondary immunodeficiency (PID/SID) and can be infused via pump or manual push. Here, we describe patient-reported quality of life (QOL) in a PID/SID cohort following transition to manual push from intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg), pump-infused SCIg or no treatment (newly diagnosed).

Methods

Patients with any degree of experience of manual push completed two questionnaires on QOL and side effects: a hospital developed questionnaire and the Short Form Health Survey (SF-36). Both questionnaires were completed anonymously, 0–9 months after starting manual push.

Results

Of the patients who completed the QOL questionnaire (25/49), 7 were IgG-naïve and 18 were on IgG prior to manual push (12 transitioned from IVIg, 1 from pump-infused SCIg and 5 from both). The majority of those previously on IgG treatment preferred manual push (78%; 14/18), citing increased convenience and fewer side effects as reasons. Overall, patients reported that manual push: saved time (80%; 20/25); offered greater flexibility (80%; 20/25); and had a positive financial impact (72%; 18/25). Over half reported manual push made taking the correct dose easier (56%; 14/25) and they felt less fatigued (52%; 13/25). Most would recommend manual push over other forms of administration (67%; 16/24). For SF-36 completers (N=24), mental component summary and physical component summary scores were the same or better than the general population in 67% (16/24) and 29% (7/24), respectively.

Conclusions

Patient-reported QOL improved in most patients following transition to manual push, with the majority recommending manual push over other forms of administration.

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