P. Schulte, Netherlands

Mental Health Service Noord-Holland-Noord Residency program
Dr. P.F.J. (Raphael) Schulte, MD, PhD, has studied medicine, theology and Netherlandistic philology in Germany and the Netherlands. He trained as a psychiatrist in both countries. From 1990 until present he works at Mental Health Services North-Holland North, first at a day hospital for complex and treatment-refractory psychotic and mood disorders, then at the Policlinic for Bipolar Disorders and at present at a local mental health team for serious mental illnesses. In 2009 he was appointed residency training director of Mental Health Services Noord-Holland Noord. He has published more than 100 articles or book chapters on various subjects related to his work and research on severe mental disorders, psychopharmacology and psychotherapy and is frequently asked as referee for Dutch and international journals. Schulte designed and executed three randomized clinical trials related to clozapine. He is a renowned speaker with a special interest in improving quality of care by implementing scientific knowledge. Schulte has been a member of the Dutch Guideline Committees on ‘Coercion in Psychiatry’ and ‘Bipolar Disorders’ and of the commission for pharmacotherapy policy of the Dutch Psychiatric Association. He serves as a board member of the Netherlands Society for Bipolar Disorders and the Dutch Clozapine Collaboration Group. In 2011 he was chosen by Dutch psychiatrists as top in the field of psychiatry. In 2014 he was granted the Willem Nolen Award for excellent clinical research and quality improvement.

Moderator Of 1 Session

EPA Course
Date
Sun, 11.04.2021
Session Time
15:00 - 17:00
Room
Courses Hall B
Session Description
Clozapine is a much underused drug, due to lack of promotion by pharmaceutical companies and patient and prescriber fears of clozapine-related risks. The course fills this lacuna and teaches indication of patients for clozapine treatment (treatment refractory schizophrenia and off-label use), motivating patients for clozapine, preparation of the treatment, titration of clozapine, monitoring of clozapine plasmalevel and granulocyte counts, assessment and treatment of frequent and rare side effects, and weighing arguments for and against compulsory treatment and stopping granulocyte controls. Brief powerpoint presentations and video's will be alternated with discussions. Course director Schulte proposes to include a third course director: Dr. J. Bogers, M.D., who is a board member of the Dutch Collaboration Group too, and has been involved in many educational and scientific activities of the collaboration group.
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Live, Sessions with Voting, Ticket Required

Presenter Of 2 Presentations

Course 12: Clozapine: Chances and Pitfalls (ID 171) No Topic Needed

Clozapine: Chances and Pitfalls

Session Icon
Live, Sessions with Voting, Ticket Required
Date
Sun, 11.04.2021
Session Time
15:00 - 17:00
Room
Courses Hall B
Lecture Time
15:00 - 17:00
e-Poster Presentations (ID 1106) AS02. Bipolar Disorders

EPP0040 - Feasibility of group cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) in bipolar disorder

Session Name
e-Poster Presentations (ID 1106)
Date
Sun, 11.04.2021
Session Time
07:30 - 23:59
Room
e-Poster Gallery
Lecture Time
07:30 - 07:30

ABSTRACT

Introduction

Euthymic patients with bipolar I and II disorder (BD) often have comorbid insomnia, which is associated with worse outcome. Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) is rarely offered to this population, though preliminary research indicates CBT-I to be safe and helpful to improve sleep and mood stability.

Objectives

The present study investigates if CBT-I for euthymic BD patients is feasible and acceptable when offered in a group format.

Methods

14 euthymic bipolar disorder I or II participants participated in a 7-session group CBT-I with BD-specific modifications (CBT-I-BD), preceded by one individual session. Feasibility and acceptability were assessed by recruitment, treatment drop-out and participants’ and therapists’ evaluations, while sleep quality, mood and sleep medication were assessed at baseline, end of treatment, 3 and 6 months later.

Results

31 of 539 patients with bipolar disorder were referred, 14 were included and one dropped out of treatment. Group CBT-I-BD was acceptable as shown by high session attendance and good homework compliance. Participants highly appreciated the treatment, the group format and learning effect. Insomnia severity decreased significantly between baseline and post-treatment. Group CBT-I-BD did not cause mood episodes during treatment and although not requested, the total number of nights with sleep medication decreased.

Conclusions

Group CBT-I-BD seems to be a feasible, acceptable and therefore viable treatment for euthymic patients with bipolar disorder suffering from persistent insomnia. The small sample size, resulting in small CBT-I-BD groups was a main limitation of the study.

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