T. Wykes, United Kingdom

King's College London Psychology
Til Wykes is Professor of Clinical Psychology and Rehabilitation and Head of the School of Mental Health and Psychological Sciences at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King’s College London. She has been involved in research on rehabilitation for many years both in the development of services and the evaluation of innovative psychological treatments for psychosis. She founded the Service User Research Enterprise (SURE), which employs expert researchers with experience of using mental health services and leads on service user involvement in the Biomedical Research Centre. She edits the Journal of Mental Health and is NIHR Senior Spokesperson on Mental Health Research. She was awarded a Damehood recently for her work in mental health.

Presenter Of 3 Presentations

Symposium: Cognitive Remediation in Schizophrenia: New Evidences and Future Perspectives in the Digital Era (ID 313) No Topic Needed

Live Q&A

Tuesday, 13 April: Daily Overview (ID 1160) No Topic Needed

Daily Overview

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Live TV
Date
Tue, 13.04.2021
Session Time
09:30 - 10:00
Room
EPA TV
Lecture Time
09:30 - 10:00
Symposium: Cognitive Remediation in Schizophrenia: New Evidences and Future Perspectives in the Digital Era (ID 313) No Topic Needed

S0180 - Cognitive Remediation in the Era of New Technologies: Applications, Benefits, Limitations and Innovations

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Pre-Recorded with Live Q&A
Date
Tue, 13.04.2021
Session Time
17:30 - 19:00
Room
Channel 6
Lecture Time
18:21 - 18:38

ABSTRACT

Abstract Body

Most cognitive remediation therapies now involve computer presentation that differ in their level of sophistication and incorporation of gaming technology. But sophistication doesn’t seem to affect the benefits as few outcome differences have been noted. Rather there seems to be a need for some interaction between a therapist and client with two recent meta-analyses reporting this therapist effect. For the large-scale roll-out of cognitive remediation this poses a problem – how do we train these therapists? We know that training or at least educational background is important, so we need clear training packages and supervision. Covid-19 has also given us a greater challenge as it has limited our face-to-face interactions. To remove these two challenges we can use technology. For training we need online processes to increase training availability and for a lack of face to face contact we can provide the bridge with suitable platforms which allow the sharing of screens. Both would ensure that cognitive remediation is available to a wider group, although that requires overcoming the digital divide often experienced by people with a diagnosis of schizophrenia. The tools and the training programme issues are discussed with reference to some initial data.

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