S. Kaiser, Switzerland

Geneva University Hospitals Adult Psychiatry Division, Department of Psychiatry
Stefan Kaiser is head of the adult psychiatry division at the Geneva University Hospitals and professor of psychiatry at the University of Geneva. His research focusses on assessment, pathophysiology and treatment of the negative symptoms of schizophrenia.

Presenter Of 2 Presentations

Workshop: Recently Proposed Trans-diagnostic Criteria for Apathy: Commonalities and Differences With the Avolition/Apathy Domain of Schizophrenia (ID 300) No Topic Needed
Workshop: Recently Proposed Trans-diagnostic Criteria for Apathy: Commonalities and Differences With the Avolition/Apathy Domain of Schizophrenia (ID 300) No Topic Needed

W0022 - Apathy in Patients with Schizophrenia: Treatment Perspectives

Session Icon
Pre-Recorded with Live Q&A, Section
Date
Sun, 11.04.2021
Session Time
17:30 - 19:00
Room
Channel 5
Lecture Time
18:21 - 18:38

ABSTRACT

Abstract Body

Apathy occurs in many neuropsychiatric disorders and is a central negative symptom of schizophrenia. Apathy has severe functional consequences for patients with schizophrenia and the development of evidence-based treatments is a major challenge.

There is now increasing evidence that dysfunctions in reward processing underly apathy, in particular regarding reward anticipation, cost-benefit computation and reward learning. In addition, metacognitive processes such as defeatist performance beliefs modulate reward processing. Psychological interventions for negative symptoms target these processes. While the evidence for cognitive-behavioral therapy for negative symptoms remains limited, recent findings suggest that specifically targeting reward-related dysfunctions may improve efficacy of these interventions.

On the neurobiological level, there is now considerable evidence that a dysregulation of the dopaminergic reward system is related to reward processing dysfunctions. Regarding pharmacological treatment approaches, psychostimulants have successfully been used for apathy in dementia to target the reward system. Pro-dopaminergic drugs to target apathy in schizophrenia seem to be safer than anticipated, but their efficacy remains to be established.

At the current state of knowledge, there is no evidence-based treatment that specifically targets apathy in patients with schizophrenia today. However, there are encouraging results from research inspired by basic research in neuroscience and clinical research in patients with other neuropsychiatric disorders.

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