L. De Picker, Belgium

University Psychiatric Hospital Campus Duffel SINAPS
Clinical psychiatrist at University Psychiatric Hospital Duffel working in an inpatient unit for dialectical behaviour therapy. Postdoctoral researcher at University of Antwerp, with research interests in immunopsychiatry, sleep and emotion regulation. President-elect Belgian College of Neuropsychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry; Member EPA Committee of Education; Member ECNP Abstract & Poster Committee. Past functions: EFPT President (2015-2016) and board member (2013-2017); ECNP Education Committee (2017-2019) and Early Career Advisory Panel (2015-2019).

Moderator Of 1 Session

Clinical/Therapeutic
Date
Mon, 12.04.2021
Session Time
17:30 - 19:00
Room
Channel 3
Session Description
Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is very common, with an estimated community prevalence of 1-3%, rising to 25% in psychiatric inpatients. Nevertheless, diagnostic assessment and disclosure in patients suspected to suffer from BPD can be difficult and even uncomfortable to many clinicians. In a survey among psychiatrists, 57% indicated they had failed to disclose a diagnosis of BPD at some point in their careers, citing diagnostic uncertainty and concerns about stigma as key issues (Sisti et al. 2016). This workshop will engage the audience in an intensive discussion of the challenges clinicians face when diagnosing borderline personality disorder (BPD). We will first review when and how to disclose a suspected diagnosis of BPD to a patient, and how to involve the patient in the diagnostic process. Secondly, we will work through some common difficulties during BPD diagnostic assessment, including the differential diagnosis with other personality disorders, trauma-related disorders and developmental disorders, as well as how to deal with comorbid psychiatric and somatic conditions. Furthermore, we will address how the new dimensional approach to the classification of personality disorders adopted by ICD-11 (WHO, 2018) diverges from the classical categorical case definitions used in the ICD-10 and DSM-IV/DSM-5 diagnostic frameworks, thereby significantly altering the concept of personality disorders. We will demonstrate how to diagnose BPD according to the new classification models, using the DSM-5 checklist and PID-5 diagnostic interview. Finally, we will illustrate some of the complexities of ICD-11 versus DSM-5 diagnostic perspectives with reference to a real-life court case.
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Live

Presenter Of 4 Presentations

Workshop: Unmet Needs in Modern Psychiatric Practice: a Collaborative Workshop between the Committee on Education and EPA Scientific Sections (ID 298) No Topic Needed
LIVE - Workshop: Diagnosing Borderline Personality Disorder: A Masterclass (ID 244) No Topic Needed

Live Q&A

Session Icon
Live
Date
Mon, 12.04.2021
Session Time
17:30 - 19:00
Room
Channel 3
Lecture Time
18:40 - 19:00
LIVE - Workshop: Diagnosing Borderline Personality Disorder: A Masterclass (ID 244) No Topic Needed

W0044 - To Diagnose or Not to Diagnose Your BPD Patient

Session Icon
Live
Date
Mon, 12.04.2021
Session Time
17:30 - 19:00
Room
Channel 3
Lecture Time
17:30 - 17:44

ABSTRACT

Abstract Body

Clinicians working in every field of psychiatry will likely encounter patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) on a regular basis. Nevertheless, diagnostic assessment and disclosure in patients suspected to suffer from BPD can be difficult and even uncomfortable to many clinicians. In a survey among psychiatrists, 57% indicated they had failed to disclose a diagnosis of BPD at some point in their careers, citing diagnostic uncertainty and concerns about stigma as key issues.1 This workshop will engage the audience in an intensive discussion of when and how to disclose a suspected diagnosis of BPD to a patient, and how to involve the patient in the diagnostic process.

Dr. De Picker will demonstrate how BPD diagnostic disclosure can become a key intervention in every psychiatric setting by using a two-step process. The first step involves a review of the DSM-5 diagnostic criteria together with the patient. This is always followed by a narrative explanation using either the interpersonal hypersensitivity model or emotional vulnerability model as trait factor. With these two steps, diagnostic disclosure creates both an important validating experience for the patient and a not to be missed opportunity for psycho-education about the heritability, prognosis and treatability of borderline personality disorder which installs hope, trust and confidence.

References:

1. Sisti D, Segal AG, Siegel AM, Johnson R, Gunderson J. Diagnosing, disclosing, and documenting borderline personality disorder: a survey of psychiatrists’ practices. J Pers Disord 2016; 30: 848–56.

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Workshop: Unmet Needs in Modern Psychiatric Practice: a Collaborative Workshop between the Committee on Education and EPA Scientific Sections (ID 298) No Topic Needed

W0077 - Engineering Psychiatric Education 2.0 in Post-pandemic Europe

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Pre-Recorded with Live Q&A
Date
Tue, 13.04.2021
Session Time
15:30 - 17:00
Room
Channel 5
Lecture Time
15:52 - 16:03

ABSTRACT

Abstract Body

In the world of medical education, there is generally a lot of emphasis on following procedure and tradition, and a reluctance to challenge the norm. It takes insight and courage to question traditional approaches and paradigms: why are psychiatric training programs done the way that they are?

Reverse engineering involves taking something apart and analysing its workings to figure out how it does what it does and how it can be improved. In education, reverse engineering implies one determines learning outcomes upfront and then works back from them. Applied to postgraduate psychiatric training, it requires us to determine the basic principles or core concepts resulting in the successful formation of a well-rounded psychiatrist.

In times of crisis there usually is more leeway to challenge the status-quo – hence the saying “never waste a good crisis”. Indeed, if the COVID-19 crisis has taught us anything, it is that education should be meeting learners where their attention is at, and that any healthcare organisation can be transformed within weeks when given the right incentives.

In this workshop, Dr. De Picker will reflect on how post-COVID European psychiatric training can reinvent itself to address long-standing concerns and unmet needs. Innovative approaches will be needed to start shaping the psychiatrists of the future.

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