M. Nordentoft, Denmark

Mental Health Center Copenhagen CORE-Copenhagen Research Center for Mental Health
Merete Nordentoft is Professor in Psychiatry, University of Copenhagen. Merete Nordentoft played a leading role in developing and implementing early intervention services in Denmark. She is an expert in epidemiology, suicidal behaviour, psychopathology and early intervention in psychosis. She has led the process from research to implementation of early intervention services all over Denmark. Professor Nordentoft has worked with suicide prevention at a national level since 1997 and together with a group of epidemiologists from Nordic countries, she has demonstrated that life expectancy for people with schizophrenia is 15 to 20 years shorter than in the general population. She initiated the Danish High Risk and Resilience Study VIA 7 -a representative cohort study of 522 7 year old children with 0, 1, or 2 parents with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. Professor Nordentoft was given the prestigious awards: The Golden Scalpel, Global Excellence in Health, the Richard Wyatt Award, the Marie and August Krogh Award and the Novo Nordisk Prize. She was the president of IEPA from 2012 to 2014, and she is president elect in SIRS

Moderator Of 1 Session

EPA Course
Date
Sun, 11.04.2021
Session Time
08:00 - 10:00
Room
Courses Hall B
Session Description
Mental illness is associated with high burden of disease and it has severe individual and societal consequences. It will be of immense value to be able to intervene in risk groups identified before onset of psychosis and other severe psychiatric disorders. In first episode psychosis, early Intervention services with team-based intensive case management and family involvement are superior to standard treatment in reducing psychotic and negative symptoms and comorbid substance abuse and improving social functioning and user satisfaction. As an introduction, the results of the OPUS-trial will be presented together with meta-analyses based on similar trials. The basic principles for working in an early intervention team will be presented and discussed. Involving families is a cornerstone in early intervention. Family involvement can be in many different formats, depending on the needs and preferences of the patients and the relatives. The multifamily group approach will be presented with vignettes and tried out in role plays. The implementation of OPUS all over Denmark will be presented together with the Danish OPUS-fidelity study.
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Live, Ticket Required, Sessions with Voting

Presenter Of 5 Presentations

Course 10: Early Intervention in Psychosis: Working as a Team and Involving Families (ID 832) No Topic Needed

Early Intervention in Psychosis: Working and Involving Families

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Live, Ticket Required, Sessions with Voting
Date
Sun, 11.04.2021
Session Time
08:00 - 10:00
Room
Courses Hall B
Lecture Time
08:00 - 10:00
Symposium: Cognitive Remediation in Schizophrenia: New Evidences and Future Perspectives in the Digital Era (ID 313) No Topic Needed

Live Q&A

Symposium: Early Intervention in Psychoses: Assessment and Treatment to Improve Functional Outcome (ID 352) No Topic Needed

Live Q&A

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Pre-Recorded with Live Q&A, Section
Date
Mon, 12.04.2021
Session Time
19:30 - 21:00
Room
Channel 3
Lecture Time
20:38 - 20:58
Symposium: Early Intervention in Psychoses: Assessment and Treatment to Improve Functional Outcome (ID 352) No Topic Needed

S0126 - Negative Symptoms Assessment in Early Intervention Settings: Implications for Early Identification and Treatment

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Pre-Recorded with Live Q&A, Section
Date
Mon, 12.04.2021
Session Time
19:30 - 21:00
Room
Channel 3
Lecture Time
19:47 - 20:04

ABSTRACT

Abstract Body

Negative symptoms are a core feature of schizophrenia spectrum disorders associated with poor outcomes such as low remission rates and impairments in daily functioning and quality of life in early psychosis.The assessment of negative symptoms in early psychotic disorders is predominantly conducted by use of first-generation scales such as the PANSS and the SANS, along with the SIPS and CAARMS for the psychosis clinical high-risk (CHR) state. Following the progressed conceptualization of negative symptoms, it has, however, been recognized that these scales suffer important methodological limitations. This warrants a use of second-generation scales such as the Brief Negative Symptom Scale (BNSS) and the Clinical Assessment Interview for Negative Symptoms (CAINS) in early intervention settings in order to achieve a more accurate assessment of the negative symptom complex. Advancing the assessment of negative symptoms in early psychosis may also guide more targeted intervention approaches aimed at improving functional outcome. Albeit recognizing that negative symptoms constitute an important barrier to a good functional outcome in psychotic disorders, few studies have directly aimed at alleviating negative symptoms in early psychosis. Meta-analytical evidence does, however, exist on the efficacy of the combined treatment modalities incorporated in Early Intervention Services (e.g. intensive and assertive case management, family involvement etc.) in reducing negative symptoms in first-episode psychosis. Evidence on the effect of interventions for improving negative symptoms in the CHR state is lacking. Developing targeted, and possibly more individualized negative symptoms treatment approaches, constitute an essential future research area.

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Symposium: Cognitive Remediation in Schizophrenia: New Evidences and Future Perspectives in the Digital Era (ID 313) No Topic Needed

S0178 - Cognitive Remediation in Subjects at UHR for Psychosis: Is This the Right Time?

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Pre-Recorded with Live Q&A
Date
Tue, 13.04.2021
Session Time
17:30 - 19:00
Room
Channel 6
Lecture Time
17:47 - 18:04