A. Nomidou, Greece

Aikaterini Nomidou GAMIAN-Europe, Secretary General Being an active carer to her brother who lives with schizophrenia and seeing the problems faced by families trying to cope with mental illness consequences and the unfairness of the situation service users find themselves in prompted Katerina to become actively involved in the mental health issues that affect vulnerable people and society as a whole. This is why she decided to study Law and to delve deeper in mental health, law and human rights. She is a member of the WHO Technical Advisory Group on the mental health impacts of COVID-19 in the WHO European Region, the EC pool of experts, the IMI pool of patient experts and has worked with governments and organisations on mental health policies and legislations, including in Greece, Afghanistan, Qatar, United Arab Emirates and Sierra Leone. Katerina has been a Technical Reviewer of the WHO QualityRights materials for training, guidance and transformation that has recently been launched, and she invests time and passion to build capacity among key stakeholders on how to implement a human rights and recovery approach in the area of mental health in line with the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and other international human rights standards.

Moderator Of 1 Session

Date
Sun, 11.04.2021
Session Time
10:00 - 11:30
Room
Channel 1
Session Description
Now is the time to place digital mental health at the heart of national and European health strategies to speed up implementation – especially in a global crisis like the present Covid-19 pandemic with physical distancing, societal lock-down, and psychosocial derangement by using telemental health, selfmanagement tools and other digital options.Mental health systems need a well-balanced combination of guidance, regulation, legislation and education, plus awareness campaigns to ensure that the use of safe, effective and high-quality digital mental health approaches is promoted to benefit the (mental) health of European citizens. More attention should be given to sensitising the public, developing needs-tailored approaches for specific target groups, improving training for the mental health workforce, and developing guidelines and transparent information about digital mental health products and services. More research is needed to identify how European citizens may effectively benefit from digital mental health approaches, including efficacy, cost-effectiveness and implementation strategies. To achieve these goals, the engagement of all stakeholders (health professionals, developers, users, and policy makers) is required.The presentation by Oyono Vlijter (Diemen, The Netherlands) describes how to overcome challenges for implementing digital mental health across Europe. Heleen Riper (Amsterdam, The Netherlands) gives an overview of research models and results with an eye on implementation efforts. Challenges and opportunities for the members of the EPA Council of National Psychiatric Associations in implementing digital mental health are presented by Simavi Vahip (Izmir, Turkey). Wolfgang Gaebel (Düsseldorf, Germany) is elucidating the role of a transnational policy for a concerted action planning in implementation.
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Presenter Of 4 Presentations

LIVE - Symposium: Implementing Digital Mental Health Across Europe (ID 608) No Topic Needed

Live Q&A

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Live
Date
Sun, 11.04.2021
Session Time
10:00 - 11:30
Room
Channel 1
Lecture Time
11:08 - 11:28
LIVE - Symposium: Implementing Alternatives to Coercion in Mental Health Care (ID 635) No Topic Needed
Women as Leaders (ID 1135) No Topic Needed

Women as Leaders

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Live, Ask the Expert
Date
Mon, 12.04.2021
Session Time
10:30 - 11:30
Room
Ask the Expert B
Lecture Time
10:30 - 11:30
Presenter
LIVE - Symposium: Implementing Alternatives to Coercion in Mental Health Care (ID 635) No Topic Needed

S0083 - Service User Perspectives on Coercion in Mental Health

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Date
Mon, 12.04.2021
Session Time
08:00 - 09:30
Room
Channel 1
Lecture Time
08:34 - 08:51
Presenter

ABSTRACT

Abstract Body

While recovery is a deeply personal journey it is also a product of interaction facilitated or impeded through the dynamic interplay of many forces, such as among characteristics of the individual, of the environment and of the exchange. To move recovery forward, recovery-oriented systems in recovery-facilitating environments are needed. Mental health professionals can either facilitate or hinder this journey. Service users and families want to feel they are more than their medical concerns, more than ‘the suicidal’ in room five. Respecting individuals and their human rights, active and engaged listening, including patients in their own healing plan, promoting wellness and engaging with compassion build trust between patients and health care professionals, leading to willingness to follow through with care plans. At the same time, by creating emotional connections and environments, not only can frequent burnouts be prevented, but productivity can be increased.

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