C. Steinebach, Switzerland

ZHAW Zürich University of Applied Sciences School of Applied Psychology
After having worked at a child guidance clinic for some years I became head of a center for early education. During these years I worked with children and families doing diag-nostics, counseling, and supervision. In 1995 I became professor of special education at the Catholic University of Applied Sciences in Freiburg (Germany), serving for some years as head of institute of research and development and president. Starting in 2007 I became professor at the Zurich University of Applied Sciences, dean of the School of Applied Psychology, director of the Institute of Applied Psychology, Zurich (Switzerland), and in 2013 adjunct pro-fessor at Ryerson University, Toronto (CA). I am member of different national and international associa-tions. Currently I am president of the European Federation of Psychologists’ Associations (EFPA) and member of the EC of SGP Swiss Psychological Society. I am a developmental psychologist. My research interests relate to resilience, youth development, health promotion in youth, and counseling. Recent research projects include mindfulness and peer support in youth, health promotion in youth, and team development.

Presenter Of 5 Presentations

Sunday, 11 April: Highlights of the Day (ID 1170) No Topic Needed

Highlights of the Day

Session Icon
Live TV
Date
Sun, 11.04.2021
Session Time
17:00 - 17:30
Room
EPA TV
Lecture Time
17:00 - 17:30
LIVE - EPA Forum: Benchmarking Mental Health in Europe: Quality Indicators for Better Services and Care (ID 1109) No Topic Needed
LIVE - EPA, EAN and EFPA Symposium: You Can Tell a Good Workman by His Tools: The Instruments of Psychiatrists, Psychologists and Neurologists. Why so Different? (ID 821) No Topic Needed
LIVE - EPA Forum: Benchmarking Mental Health in Europe: Quality Indicators for Better Services and Care (ID 1109) No Topic Needed

The Value of Data in Psychology in Europe

Session Icon
Live
Date
Sat, 10.04.2021
Session Time
09:00 - 11:30
Room
Plenary
Lecture Time
11:00 - 11:10
LIVE - EPA, EAN and EFPA Symposium: You Can Tell a Good Workman by His Tools: The Instruments of Psychiatrists, Psychologists and Neurologists. Why so Different? (ID 821) No Topic Needed

EPAP0003 - EFPA Perspective

ABSTRACT

Abstract Body

Introduction: Psychologically, the question of profession-specific instruments and tools is not trivial. A profession is characterized by specific knowledge. Knowledge is regarded as part of professional competencies: What is done? How is something done? Why is something done? Knowledge and skills are acquired through specific training and continuing education.

Objectives: Professional knowledge is represented in a specific language. In addition, standards and regulations apply to differentiate it from other professions. Different languages and special professional regulations make cooperation more difficult. These obstacles must be overcome.

Methods: Instruments stand for professional identity. Competence-based tools are subject to professional legal regulations (e.g. following standards defined by EuroPsy Certificate of EFPA), ethical guidelines of the profession (professional ethics according to EFPA Meta-Code of Ethics) and external guidelines for professional practice (e.g. national and EU regulations). This ensures patient safety through Europe-wide standards. The investigation of profession-specific profiles and their modification, also under the conditions of the pandemic, becomes important.

Results: Professional instruments are protected by professional political boundaries. Profession-specific profiles are also an invitation to "coopetition". While differentiation tends to lead to complementary mission fulfillment in practice, openness leads to a "spill-over of skills" in interdisciplinary practice. Alignment of competence profiles and cooperation are encouraged.

Conclusion: The future certainly lies in closer cooperation between the professions. The search for fundamental common ground (consilience), for effective and sustainable interventions (efficiency) and the demand for evidence-based practice (according to common ethical standards) place the well-founded benefit of an instrument for clients above any other interests.

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