C. Bassetti, Switzerland

Insel Gruppe AG Department of Neurology

Presenter Of 4 Presentations

LIVE - EPA, EAN and EFPA Symposium: You Can Tell a Good Workman by His Tools: The Instruments of Psychiatrists, Psychologists and Neurologists. Why so Different? (ID 821) No Topic Needed
LIVE - EPA Forum: Benchmarking Mental Health in Europe: Quality Indicators for Better Services and Care (ID 1109) No Topic Needed

Mapping the Burden of Neurological Diseases in Europe

Session Icon
Live
Date
Sat, 10.04.2021
Session Time
09:00 - 11:30
Room
Plenary
Lecture Time
11:10 - 11:20
LIVE - EPA Forum: Benchmarking Mental Health in Europe: Quality Indicators for Better Services and Care (ID 1109) No Topic Needed
LIVE - EPA, EAN and EFPA Symposium: You Can Tell a Good Workman by His Tools: The Instruments of Psychiatrists, Psychologists and Neurologists. Why so Different? (ID 821) No Topic Needed

EPAP0002 - EAN Perspective

ABSTRACT

Abstract Body

29th European Congress of Psychiatry (EPA 2021)

„You can tell a good workman by his tools: The instruments of psychiatrists, psychologists and neurologists: Why so different?“

The term psychology („the study of the soul“) appeared for the first time in a printed book of Freigius in
1578, while the term neurology („the study of the form and function of the nervous system“) was coined by
Willis in 1664 and that of psychiatry („the medical treatment of the soul“) by Reil in 1808.
First physicians to devote entirely to neurology appeared in the midst of the 19th century in France,
Germany, and England. Around this time neurology, (biological) psychiatry and (experimental) psychology
converged to share similar roots in the brain. The three disciplines separated (again) at the beginning of the
20th century.
Neurology remained for over 100 years mainly a diagnostic discipline, in which history and clinical
examination were expected to lead to the identification of a topographic syndrome (or lesion) and eventually
its etiology. In the last 30 years neurology underwent a revolution. While the importance (and validity) of
phenotypical diagnoses remained, new (e.g. neuroimaging, genetic) tools have made precise diagnoses and
causal treatments increasingly possible, transforming neurology into a treating discipline.
The author will discuss why the separation between neurology, psychiatry and psychology is artificial (and
even harmful for patients), how the multidimensional tools developed over the years by these disciplines can
be of common interest, and what the EAN does to promote interdisciplinary scientific, educational, and
political collaborations.

Hide