A. Savic, Croatia

University of Zagreb School of Medicine, University Psychiatric Hospital Vrapce Department of Psychiatry and Psychological Medicine
Doctor Savic graduated from the University of Zagreb’s School of Medicine, and completed his residency in psychiatry at the University Psychiatric Hospital Vrapce (Zagreb, Croatia), where he currently works as a psychiatrist at the Department of Diagnostics and Intensive Care, First Episode Psychosis Unit. He currently heads the FEP day hospital program. Dr. Savic additionally specialized in forensic psychiatry. Dr. Savic received his PhD from University of Zagreb, and is currently a postdoctoral associate at the School of Medicine. He spent a year at the Yale University as a Fulbright Scholarship grantee, and continues to collaborate with the neuroimaging lab on projects aimed at elucidating biological underpinnings of mental disorders.

Moderator Of 1 Session

Clinical/Therapeutic
Date
Tue, 13.04.2021
Session Time
17:30 - 19:00
Room
Channel 2
Session Description
Despite the fact that the current understanding of attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has increased among mental health professionals, it is still under-diagnosed and under-treated in several European countries, leading to chronic impairment and higher disease costs. This workshop is intended to provide an update on the fundamental and important aspects of ADHD across the lifespan. Educational objectives of the workshop include discussing psychopathology, neuroimaging, diagnostic tools, and differential diagnosis of ADGD. Gender differences in ADHD are poorly understood possibly because of the underrepresentation of females in the literature. Therefore, a comparison of ADHD between males and females will be discussed in light of a systematic review. Psychoeducation and general treatment approach, and more specifically, pharmacological treatment of ADHD with comorbidities are the other topics that will be covered during the session. By participating in this workshop, the participants will have a platform to ask questions, discuss and share opinions on fundamental aspects of ADHD from a lifespan perspective.
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Live, ECP Session

Presenter Of 3 Presentations

Workshop: Youth Mental Health Now: Focus on Prevention, Intervention and Outcomes (ID 275) No Topic Needed
LIVE - ECP Workshop: Can we Have Your Attention Please? (ID 836) No Topic Needed

Live Q&A

Session Icon
Live, ECP Session
Date
Tue, 13.04.2021
Session Time
17:30 - 19:00
Room
Channel 2
Lecture Time
18:38 - 18:58
Workshop: Youth Mental Health Now: Focus on Prevention, Intervention and Outcomes (ID 275) No Topic Needed

W0057 - Prodromal Services for At-risk Youth and Their Integration with Existing Programs: A “Modular Integration” Model

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Pre-Recorded with Live Q&A
Date
Mon, 12.04.2021
Session Time
19:30 - 21:00
Room
Channel 6
Lecture Time
19:58 - 20:12
Presenter

ABSTRACT

Abstract Body

Prodromal symptoms may precede onset of the psychotic disorders by years, and while we have instruments for identification of clinical high-risk (CHR), existing predictive models yield low specificity and fail in successfuly predicting transition to psychosis. This, along with the fact that we see a notable decline in transition rates, and the ever-looming lack of resources, means CHR work is still often relegated to research settings. First-episode psychosis (FEP) unit of our institution offers both inpatient and outpatient programs, and while it is common having CHR services emerge from FEP frameworks, there is an inherent risk in drowning the diverse CHR population into very specific FEP interventions and settings, risking additional burden of stigma.

Model our institution introduced includes:

⇒Non-dependence on research funding;

⇒Flexible integration in available resources (e.g., FEP interventions, anxiety disorders interventions, substance-use programs);

⇒Dimensional approach with interdisciplinary assessment of capacities/needs non-reliant on supposed diagnosis;

⇒Embedded coordinating clinician ensuring “coordination” of CHR population "dispersed" among different programs;

⇒Collaboration with child psychiatrists allowing smoother transfer of at-risk youth;

⇒Recruitment through sensitized general practitioners and counseling services.

No model of care, especially in area lacking conclusive predictive models, can be generalized to different health care systems, as practices and resources vary significantly. Nevertheless, the model presented makes a contribution to the care of CHR population, utilizing/integrating available resources, focusing on dimensional formulation of needs, and avoiding possible stigmatization. Furthermore, widely available CHR services, congruent with any research initiatives, might help us reach the necessary critical mass of data and experience needed for the final push towards clearer prediction models and treatment algorithms.

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