A. Samokhvalov, Canada

University of Toronto Department of Psychiatry
Dr. Andriy V. Samokhvalov, MD, PhD, FRCPC, CSCS is an Associate Professor with the University of Toronto Department of Psychiatry and McMaster University Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences. He is a staff psychiatrist at Homewood Health Centre and a courtesy psychiatrist and a collaborator scientist with Centre for Addiction and Mental Health. He has a number of publications on a variety of psychiatric problems with the main focus of research and practice on integrated assessment and treatment models for concurrent disorders. In addition to that Dr.Samokhvalov is active on social media platforms promoting mental and physical health via optimal nutrition, exercise and stress management.

Moderator Of 1 Session

EPA Course
Date
Sat, 10.04.2021
Session Time
16:30 - 18:30
Room
Courses Hall C
Session Description
In medical schools we always hear that we are supposed to treat the patient, not the disease, but somehow by the time we graduate and become specialists we learn to focus on select aspects of our patient’s conditions and stop seeing the big picture, which includes a variety of health indicators and the determinants of health. We study guidelines and use evidence-based medicine to address symptoms by prescribing medications, using psychotherapeutic approaches, and too often we overlook endocrine disorders, nutrition, lack of exercise, sedentary lifestyle, obesity, sleep disturbances, smoking and substance use. All these factors are underrecognized in current treatment models and this course is intended to bridge this gap and to provide our colleagues with all the tools necessary to provide truly integrated treatments to their patients, which will include nutritional and metabolic assessments, exercise and weight loss prescription, time management and sleep hygiene, behavioral activation and substance use treatments when necessary. We will focus on affective disorders, primarily on depression, but also on anxiety and fibromyalgia as the most prevalent conditions in which lifestyle modification was shown to be effective in scientific literature.
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Live, Sessions with Voting, Ticket Required

Presenter Of 2 Presentations

Course 07: Lifestyle Modification for Improved Outcomes in Major Psychiatric Disorders (ID 117) No Topic Needed

Lifestyle Modification for Improved Outcomes in Major Psychiatric Disorders

Session Icon
Live, Sessions with Voting, Ticket Required
Date
Sat, 10.04.2021
Session Time
16:30 - 18:30
Room
Courses Hall C
Lecture Time
16:30 - 18:30
e-Poster Viewing (ID 1107) AS46. Addictive disorders

EPV0686 - Food addiction in a large non-clinical sample of Canadians

Session Name
e-Poster Viewing (ID 1107)
Date
Sun, 11.04.2021
Session Time
07:30 - 23:59
Room
e-Poster Gallery
Lecture Time
07:30 - 07:30

ABSTRACT

Introduction

The concept of food addiction emerged recently due to the similarities between food overconsumption patterns and addictive drugs. This concept is not yet included into ICD or DSM as it still needs to be further investigated. Relationship between obesity and food consumption as well as the psychological indicators of food addiction are of particular interest.

Objectives

To examine the prevalence of food addiction and its relationship to obesity, quality of life and multiple indicators of impulsivity.

Methods

Cross-sectional in-person assessment of 1432 community adults (age 38.93+/-13.7; 58% female). Measurements: Yale Food Addiction Scale 2.0, anthropometrics, body composition, World Health Organization Quality of Life scale, and impulsivity measures including impulsive personality traits, delay discounting, and behavioral inhibition.

Results

The prevalence of food addiction was 9.3% and substantially below that of obesity (32.7%). Food addiction was more prevalent among obese individuals and also was associated with higher BMI among non-obese participants. It was associated with significantly lower quality of life in all domains, and significantly higher impulsive personality traits, particularly negative and positive urgency.

Conclusions

In this general community sample, food addiction was present in slightly fewer than 1 in 10 individuals, approximately one-third the prevalence of obesity, but notably the food addiction has been mostly represented within the subsample of obese individuals. Food addiction was robustly associated with substantively lower quality of life and elevations in impulsivity, particularly in deficits in emotional regulation. These data suggest food addiction may be thought of as a subtype of obesity and, in non-obese individuals, possibly a prodrome.

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