F. Gaughran, United Kingdom

South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust National Psychosis Unit
Fiona Gaughran is Professor in Physical Health and Clinical Therapeutics in Psychiatry at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King’s College London and the Director of Research and Development at the South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, where she is the Lead Consultant for the National Psychosis Service. Professor Gaughran holds fellowships of the Royal Colleges of Physicians in London, Edinburgh and Dublin and the Royal College of Psychiatrists. As part of her clinical role, Professor Gaughran is responsible for implementing new, evidence-based approaches to help people who have psychotic illnesses that have been resistant to treatment. Her research interests are largely focused on the interface between physical health and severe mental illness and on the management of psychosis. She recently co-edited books on “Treatment Refractory Schizophrenia” and “The Maudsley Practice Guidelines for Physical Health in Psychiatry”. Professor Gaughran was named in the Web of Science “Highly-cited” list for 2020 reflecting multiple papers ranking in the top 1% by citations for their field.

Presenter Of 3 Presentations

Tuesday, 13 April: Midday Roundup (ID 1166) No Topic Needed

Midday Roundup

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Live TV
Date
Tue, 13.04.2021
Session Time
13:00 - 13:30
Room
EPA TV
Lecture Time
13:00 - 13:30
LIVE - ECP Symposium: Let's Talk About the Pandemic (ID 835) No Topic Needed

Live Q&A

LIVE - ECP Symposium: Let's Talk About the Pandemic (ID 835) No Topic Needed

ECP0028 - Research in Mental Health During the Pandemic

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Live, ECP Session
Date
Tue, 13.04.2021
Session Time
15:30 - 17:00
Room
Channel 2
Lecture Time
15:30 - 15:47

ABSTRACT

Abstract Body

The 2020 coronavirus pandemic sparked sudden change in all spheres of life, not least health services. Across Europe clinical research had to adapt. The virus peaked in different places at different times, with London’s first wave in March-May. The National Institute for Health Research paused all face to face research at NHS and social care sites except for nationally prioritised Urgent Public Health (UHP) Covid-19 studies.

The first UPH studies focused on acute Covid-19, largely in physical health settings. Research leaders quickly highlighted the need for high quality research data on the effects of the pandemic on the mental health of the general population, as well as the mental health and neuropsychiatric effects of the virus itself, to allow for the development and evaluation of mitigation strategies. The major UK research funders have resourced this. Once the first wave abated, paused research was restarted according to national prioritisation guidance.

In Maudsley we worked closely with research teams to develop strategies to make our research programmes as Covid-19 adaptive as possible, maximising remote interaction with research participants, with robust infection prevention procedures if face to face meetings were necessary. Examples of innovative strategies will be shared. In January 2021 with the more transmissible variant of SARS CoV2, face to face research paused again, except where risk was outweighed by patient benefit in continuing.

As patients benefit hugely from research and innovation and have better outcomes if treated in ‘research-active’ hospitals, maintaining access to research opportunities without increasing risk of contracting Covid-19 will be key in coming months.

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