Welcome to the EPA 2021 Interactive Programme

The viewing of sessions and E-Posters cannot be accessed from this conference calendar. All sessions and E-Posters are accessible via the Main Lobby in the virtual platform.

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Fully Live with Live Q&A On Demand with Live Q&A  ECP Session Section Session EPA Course (Pre-Registration Required) Product Theatre

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167 Sessions

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EPA Course
Date
Sat, 10.04.2021
Session Time
16:30 - 18:30
Room
Courses Hall C
Session Description
In medical schools we always hear that we are supposed to treat the patient, not the disease, but somehow by the time we graduate and become specialists we learn to focus on select aspects of our patient’s conditions and stop seeing the big picture, which includes a variety of health indicators and the determinants of health. We study guidelines and use evidence-based medicine to address symptoms by prescribing medications, using psychotherapeutic approaches, and too often we overlook endocrine disorders, nutrition, lack of exercise, sedentary lifestyle, obesity, sleep disturbances, smoking and substance use. All these factors are underrecognized in current treatment models and this course is intended to bridge this gap and to provide our colleagues with all the tools necessary to provide truly integrated treatments to their patients, which will include nutritional and metabolic assessments, exercise and weight loss prescription, time management and sleep hygiene, behavioral activation and substance use treatments when necessary. We will focus on affective disorders, primarily on depression, but also on anxiety and fibromyalgia as the most prevalent conditions in which lifestyle modification was shown to be effective in scientific literature.
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Live, Ticket Required, Sessions with Voting
Date
Mon, 12.04.2021
Session Time
19:30 - 21:00
Room
Channel 4
Session Description
The Live Q&A of this session will take place in the Live Sessions auditorium. Please refer to the interactive programme for the exact time and channel.

The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic is causing a global health crisis of unprecedented proportions in modern times. Importantly, the pandemic is expected to have negative health consequences beyond those caused by the coronavirus per se – including significant psychological distress. This symposium will focus on the mental health consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic. First, Dr. Christoph U. Correll will provide an overview of the design of the “Collaborative Outcomes study on Health and Functioning during Infection Times” (COH-FIT), putting it in the context of available evidence when the study started. He will present also global results from over 100 countries across 6 continents, focusing on the subgroup of >15,000 minors, in whom their caregivers rated the impact of COVID-19 on their physical and mental well-being. Second, Dr. Marco Solmi will present global results of COH-FIT study in adults from over 100 countries and >50,000 participants across 6 continents, with a specific focus on Italian sample (over 7,000 respondents, including a nationally representative sample). Third, Dr. Karolina Skonieczna-Żydecka will present results of the COH-FIT study in Poland with >1500 participants, with a specific focus on health workers. Fourth, Dr. Søren D. Østergaard will present the results of a survey in which 6000 randomly drawn patients with mental disorders undergoing treatment in the psychiatric services of the Central Denmark Region (catchment area of 1.3 million people) will be involved. The survey, which will be conducted in June 2020, will focus on well-being and symptom levels of the participants during the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Pre-Recorded with Live Q&A
EPA Course
Date
Mon, 12.04.2021
Session Time
08:00 - 10:00
Room
Courses Hall A
Session Description
Proposed by the EPA Section on Old Age Psychiatry - Despite advances in psychopharmacology, up to 30% of patients with psychiatric condition continue to experience disabling symptoms despite being on medication. Thanks to their ability to modulate cerebral networks, non-invasive brain stimulation methods have been proposed as an alternative method to alleviate symptoms in patients with treatment resistant psychiatric conditions, especially depression, schizophrenia and substance use disorders. Non-invasive brain stimulation methods cover a broad range of approaches including electroconvulsivotherapy (ECT), repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), transcranial electrical stimulation (tES: tDCS, tRNS, tACS, tSOS,…). The course will have four sections: 1) Overview of rTMS and tDCS methods -Brief presentations of their main indications in psychiatry (depression, schizophrenia and substance use disorders) and their place in the treatment algorithm, with a focus on the elderly 2) Practice exercises with the devices 3)General Discussion about strengths, weaknesses and gaps in adult as well as elderly population The goals of this course are to: 1) Review recent non-invasive brain stimulation approaches (rTMS and tDCS) for the treatment of psychiatric symptoms and question their relevance in late-life psychiatric disorders. 2) Practice with available brain stimulation devices approved as medical device by health authorities. 3) Discuss the strengths, weaknesses and gaps of the various approaches in each indication
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Live, Section, Ticket Required
Clinical/Therapeutic
Date
Sun, 11.04.2021
Session Time
15:30 - 17:00
Room
Channel 7
Session Description
The Live Q&A of this session will take place in the Live Sessions auditorium. Please refer to the interactive programme for the exact time and channel.

Proposed by the EPA Section on Psychotherapy -This symposium will present current knowledge, development and clinical experiences on internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy (ICBT) developed in various settings and countries. Presentations include a description of the journey towards national implementation of ICBT and its outcomes in Sweden (MK), of individually tailored ICBT with different modes of delivery and different degrees of therapist support. Moreover, a presentation by VK include Adaptive Treatment Strategies, where a wide range of data before and during treatment are processed by an AI-driven clinical decision support tool guiding the adaption of therapist-guided ICBT at the individual level. Another presentation (KM) will describe the implementation of a national ICBT clinic in Denmark, from the first initial steps through to becoming a national service. Current evidence of effectiveness and implementation efforts conducted at the clinic. JB will report on a pilot study comparing online versus face-to-face transdiagnostic therapy in Arabic-speaking refugees. She will describe the different aspects of tailoring treatment contents in these two settings and discuss potential advantages of a tailored approach for the specific patient population.

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Pre-Recorded with Live Q&A, Section
Clinical/Therapeutic
Date
Sun, 11.04.2021
Session Time
17:30 - 19:00
Room
Channel 7
Session Description
The Live Q&A of this session will take place in the Live Sessions auditorium. Please refer to the interactive programme for the exact time and channel.

Developed over 80 years ago, ECT continues to be the most powerful and acutely effective treatment available for severe, often treatment-resistant, depression. Its use is supported by data from randomised trials and meta-analyses. However, there is still a need to develop better strategies to optimise ECT practice, by identifying both patient-level and treatment-level characteristics that predict therapeutic benefit and minimise side effects. This symposium will be informed by our on-going, or recently completed, clinical studies and trials. We will discuss whether we should focus our attention on the ‘average’ ECT treatment technique that suits the majority of our patients (i.e. “one size fits all”) or tailor the treatment to the needs of individual patients. Pascal Sienaert will discuss the available evidence to guide clinicians in personalising electrode position, dosing strategies and parameter selection, and to make individualised adjustments during the ECT course. Linda van Diermen will identify key clinical elements that predispose to beneficial treatment effects, distinguishing between primary and secondary predictors, and formulate recommendations to aid in patient-treatment matching. Esmee Verwijk will address why outcome measures at the group level do not always fit individual patients and how patients can be helped by preventing and/or treating cognitive side effects. The relatively neglected issue of optimising speed of response to ECT and the role of electrode placement and other clinical factors will be discussed by Declan McLoughlin. Together, the sessions in this symposium will help participants to apply evidence-based methods to personalising ECT practice for their patients.

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Pre-Recorded with Live Q&A
Date
Mon, 12.04.2021
Session Time
15:30 - 17:00
Room
Channel 4
Session Description
The Live Q&A of this session will take place in the Live Sessions auditorium. Please refer to the interactive programme for the exact time and channel.

The work of psychiatrists has been profoundly disrupted by the COVID-19 pandemic (e.g., redeployment, shifting institutional priorities, sudden massive use of telehealth services). At the same time, mental health concerns in the population have been exacerbated by the pandemic (e.g., due to isolation, anxiety, substance use), resulting in increased need for services at a time when accessing services is more difficult. This symposium will present the results of two large longitudinal studies that speak to these issues. The first is a global, multilingual study of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on clinical practice and well-being of psychiatrists and other mental health professionals. Results will be presented from two waves of data collection with members of the World Health Organization's Global Clinical Practice Network (GCPN), comprising 15,500 clinicians from 159 countries. The first speaker will focus on predictors of distress, occupational burnout, and practice disruption over time and the use of distance technologies for evaluation and treatment. The second and third speakers will focus on China and Russia, examining impact on GCPN members as a function of the course of the pandemic in those countries. The fourth speaker will focus on the mental health impact of the COVID-19 pandemic among a representative sample of the general population of Madrid (n = 900), interviewed by telephone at two time points. The symposium will consider the implications of the results for the delivery of mental health services and for programs and policies that protect well-being and reduce occupational burnout among psychiatrists.

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Pre-Recorded with Live Q&A
EPA Course
Date
Sat, 10.04.2021
Session Time
16:30 - 18:30
Room
Courses Hall D
Session Description
In the era of personalised and integrated mental health care, neuroscience will play an increasing role in psychiatry. To take advantage of this, clinicians need a robust foundation in neuroscience. Most psychiatrists are not experts in neuroscience, but they need to be knowledgeable enough and confident enough to effectively integrate into patient care the advances that will be made during their working lives. Early Career Psychiatrists and more established clinicians need to be prepared to model this integration for psychiatrists in training, because the next generation of psychiatrists, more than any before, will need to be able to understand, critically evaluate and translate new research findings into improved clinical care for their patients. This course will present an immersive experience of this new era of integrated neuroscience. Participants will gain experience of innovative strategies for teaching and learning in a range of settings, including patient education. Participants will take part in facilitated pair- and group-work, including role play of psychiatrist-patient interactions, and teaching scenarios, using examples of relevant knowledge and understanding gained from cutting-edge neuroscience research. Participants will interact closely with speakers to highlight and exchange best practice and to identify opportunities for adaptation of strategies to different national contexts. On completion of the course, our aim is that participants will better understand techniques to integrate modern neuroscience into psychiatric training and will have increased confidence in their didactic skills.
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Live, Ticket Required
EPA Course
Date
Sat, 10.04.2021
Session Time
16:30 - 18:30
Room
Courses Hall A
Session Description
Guidelines emphasize on psychotherapeutic treatment as they are the most studied and successful type of treatment. However, a large proportion of BPD patients do not have access to psychotherapy for different reasons (i.e.: this kind of treatment does not exist in their area, patient is not motivated). In this course, we will review clinically useful strategies to improve the outcome for these patients, which can be used whether the patient has access to psychotherapy or not. First, we will present ways to review diagnosis and efficient ways to offer psychoeducation to the client. Then we will consider treating clinical comorbidities such as addiction, PTSD, depressive disorder, ADHD. Furthermore, we will present the common medical disorders in this population and some tools to improve their medical management (screening, follow-up). We will highlight the potential of lifestyle medicine (improving nutrition, sleep, physical activity). We will discuss the strengths and weaknesses of psychiatric hospitalization and emergency services and offer guidelines for efficient case management. Considerations related to the usefulness of psychometric tools (screening and outcome measures) will be discussed. Lastly, we will introduce some new kinds of treatments and discuss prevention.
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Live, Ticket Required, Sessions with Voting
EPA Course
Date
Mon, 12.04.2021
Session Time
17:30 - 19:30
Room
Courses Hall A
Session Description
Proposed by the EPA Section on Tele Mental Health - Psychiatry is being highly benefited from the possibilities enabled by globalization and the digital world to conduct valuable international research. Researchers can set up diverse teams coordinated in real-time and easily design different studies and interventions to be applied globally. Moreover, the current COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the value and need for such collaborations. This course aims at providing the audience with practical methods, tools, and skills for conducting internet-based international research, harnessing the growing expertise of a group of young European psychiatrists. The faculty will be available to assist each of the attendees before, during and after the course, and will be providing additional handouts, references, templates, written guidelines, and video tutorials. This activity is meant to be eminently practical and interactive, combining presentations with discussions of examples of work from the faculty and supervised individual and group exercises. The contents will include the introduction of skills, tips, and free tools for designing research proposals, team coordination, international surveys, systematic reviews, reference managing, analysis of social media contents, manuscript writing and publishing, and science dissemination, among other topics. The course would welcome any mental health practitioner/researcher. It will not necessarily require experience in the methods and tools to be presented and will be further tailored to the actual audience. It may be of particular use for early-career psychiatrists and trainees. This course aligns with the conference general theme and is a joint proposal of the EPA Scientific Section of TeleMental Health and the Early Career Psychiatrists Committee.
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Live, Section, Ticket Required, Sessions with Voting
EPA Course
Date
Mon, 12.04.2021
Session Time
15:00 - 17:00
Room
Courses Hall B
Session Description
Routine challenges such as non-response at established daily doses, poor adherence or pharmacokinetic interactions with clinical consequences and adverse effects (pharmacovigilance) comprise a major part of psychopharmacotherapy. Therapeutic drug monitoring and pharmacogenetic tests are valuable tools that allow fort treatment tailoring in routine clinical care. This course will be centered on the following issues: • Introduction: Definition of TDM in psychiatry, theoretical background, practical recommendations; cytochrome P-450: polymorphisms, clinical consequences of a genetic particularity in metabolism, practical recommendations for genotyping and phenotyping. • Presentation of vignettes: TDM alone and in combination with pharmacogenetic tests: general situations; situations of interactions, combination treatments; in special populations (elderly, forensic patients, pregnant patients, adolescents, somatically ill patients); pharmacovigilance
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Live, Ticket Required, Sessions with Voting
Date
Tue, 13.04.2021
Session Time
15:30 - 17:00
Room
Channel 4
Session Description
The Live Q&A of this session will take place in the Live Sessions auditorium. Please refer to the interactive programme for the exact time and channel.

Key processes in human neurodevelopment take place within the biological environment of pregnancy and birth. Insults within this biological context can have long-term consequences on brain function, ranging from learning disabilities to complex psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. Birth asphyxia is the failure to start regular respiration within a minute of birth and is a neonatal emergency that may cause hypoxia (insufficient supply of oxygen to the brain and tissues) and possible brain damage or death, if left untreated. The perinatal period is associated with high risks and represents one of the first developmental milestones of brain development. During childbirth, there are cellular processes in place that increase the resistance of neurons to hypoxia and ischemic damage. These cellular processes are resilience factors that should protect against hypoxic insult. Previous reports have found alterations in genes regulated by hypoxia in schizophrenia and the lack of hypoxia related resilience factors in the presence of birth asphyxia might increase the risk for schizophrenia development. Therapeutic interventions for birth asphyxia, typically before the onset of clear neurological and behavioral symptoms, might prevent or ameliorate the development of schizophrenia later in life.

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Pre-Recorded with Live Q&A
EPA Course
Date
Sun, 11.04.2021
Session Time
15:00 - 17:00
Room
Courses Hall B
Session Description
Clozapine is a much underused drug, due to lack of promotion by pharmaceutical companies and patient and prescriber fears of clozapine-related risks. The course fills this lacuna and teaches indication of patients for clozapine treatment (treatment refractory schizophrenia and off-label use), motivating patients for clozapine, preparation of the treatment, titration of clozapine, monitoring of clozapine plasmalevel and granulocyte counts, assessment and treatment of frequent and rare side effects, and weighing arguments for and against compulsory treatment and stopping granulocyte controls. Brief powerpoint presentations and video's will be alternated with discussions. Course director Schulte proposes to include a third course director: Dr. J. Bogers, M.D., who is a board member of the Dutch Collaboration Group too, and has been involved in many educational and scientific activities of the collaboration group.
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Live, Ticket Required, Sessions with Voting