Browsing Over 60 Sessions

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European
Session Description
Depression, anxiety, mental suffering, sexual violence, domestic violence and escalating substance use affect women more than men worldwide. The high prevalence of sexual violence suffered by women and the correspondingly high rate of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) makes women the largest single group of people affected by this disorder. Thus, gender-specific risk factors for common mental disorders that disproportionately affect women include socio-economic disadvantage, low or subordinate social status and rank, dependence on men and hugh responsibility for caring for others. e.g. children. The effects of long-term, cumulative psychosocial adversity on mental health have still not been sufficiently taken into account and studied. Despite clinical guidance on the role of mental health professionals in identifying violence against women and responding appropriately, poor identification persists and can lead to non-engagement with services and poor response to treatment. Knowledge should be gathered on the prevalence and causes of mental health problems in women and on the factors that mediate and protect them. The symposium aims to contribute to improving the mental health of women. The first speaker will talk on „Mental health and human rights of women“, the second speaker will focus on „Mentally ill mothers: How to improve their mental health“. The third speaker´s presentation will be on „Mental health of women with immigrant, refugee and asylum seeker background - how can they be engaged and supported?", while the last speaker will highlight "Gender Inequity in Health: How can it be changed?". All presentations will be discussed with the plenum.
Clinical/Therapeutic
Session Description
Proposed by the EPA section on Eating Disorders - Anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) are severe eating disorders (ED) with potential life threatening complications. Although the efficacy of treatments varies among studies, a recovery average of 30% of ED patients is acknowledged. In addition, high rates of drop-out and relapse contribute to a low efficiency of available treatments. Therefore, there is a need to improve the knowledge of the pathophysiology of these disorders in order to identify possible treatment targets and propose more accurate therapeutic interventions. The aim of this symposium is to illustrate new advances in the pathophysiology of EDs, which might provide a theoretical pathogenetic link between alterations in specific brain and/or peripheral systems and ED psychopathology in order to suggest new perspectives for prevention and/or treatment of AN and BN. To this purpose, Prof. F. Fernandez-Aranda (Barcelona, Spain) will discuss personality, cognitive and neurobiological markers associated with therapy response in EDs. Prof. Valdo Ricca (Florence, Italy,) will present the role of the reward system in EDs. Prof. Milos Gabriella (Zurich, Switzerland) will illustrate the role of hypoleptinemia in anorexia nervosa and will present the first experiences with off-label treatment with metreleptin, a leptin analogue. Dr. Philibert Duriez (Paris, France) will analyze factors that drives the increase of insight of patients treated for EDs.
Clinical/Therapeutic
Session Description
Proposed by the EPA section on Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Neurodevelopmental Disorders Across the Lifespan (NDAL) - Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder with a high prevalence, i.e. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that 1 in every 54 (1.9%) 8-year-old children had been identified as having ASD in 2016. The symptoms of ASD – which are associated with significant impairment in family, social and/or educational, occupational, or other important areas of functioning - typically present in early childhood, and always persist into adulthood. Therefore proper assessment and comprehensive management of ASD is necessary across the lifespan. Moreover, individuals with ASD often present with comorbid disorders, i.e. altogether 70% of people with ASD have at least one co-occurring psychiatric disorder. The most common comorbidities next to ASD are mood disorders, anxiety disorders, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. All these can often lead to challenges in the assessment and management of ASD. The lectures of the symposium aim to help clinicians’ work in the field of ASD across the lifespan. The speakers are professionals from child to adult mental health services as well. The topics of the presentations include: 1) the introduction of a new semi-structured clinical interview designed to support healthcare practitioners in assessing ASD in children, young people, and adults (Susan Young). 2) the demonstration of challenges in the treatment of patients with ASD and comorbid ADHD through clinical cases (Judit Balazs). 3) Pharmacological treatment of adult Autism Spectrum Disorder (Josep Antoni Ramos-Quiroga), 4) Psychological management of adult Autism Spectrum Disorder (Kobus van Rensburg).
Clinical/Therapeutic
Session Description
The novel coronavirus pandemic 2019 (COVID-19) is posing new critical challenges in many areas of mental health worldwice, such as: 1) widespread social alarm, with an overall increase of anxiety states, somatic concerns, and mood sensitivity; 2) long-lasting physical distancing due to both the response to public health protection rules and also voluntary conduct. The interaction of such conditions sharply increases the risk of inducing or reinforcing some features of conduct disorders, such as behavioural addictions. To go in-depth into the psychosocial meaning of these conducts is quite timely and potentially urgent from a clinical point of view. Addictive conducts born or reinforced in a long-lasting self-distancing condition may grow over time and root themselves also in a future normalized situation. Some behavioural risks must be considered: a) increased time spent using Internet, with very frequent development of mild to severe forms of addiction, including a compulsive need to be in touch with other people, increased/addicted use of social media., anxiety reaction when not online, etc. b) onset/increase of specific Internet-use profiles with high addictive risk, such as online gambling, gaming, shopping; most common forms of internet use may become problematic in distressed self-distancing conditions; c) increased time of physical exercise at home with compulsive features, in people with a previous profile of exercise addiction and also the lack of access to a specific sports addiction; d) possible influence on course and shaping of previously existent or newly induced features of mental disorders.
European
Session Description
Persons with severe mental disorders frequently experience discrimination and isolation due to the high levels of stigmatizing behaviours and attitudes held by the general population. Furthermore, stigma represents a significant obstacle not only for people suffering from mental disorders, but also for their relatives and their loved ones, who also experience stigma by association. Fighting stigma represents an “old unmet need” in the mental health field and several international and national organizations have promoted interventions for challenging stigma and improving mental health literacy in the general population. It has been clearly demonstrated that the specific cultural background can impact on the development of stigmatized belief, behaviours and attitudes about people with mental disorders. Therefore, in order to overcome stigma effectively it is needed a multicultural social perspective, even for adapting antistigma initiatives to the specific cultural context of each country or region. Although so many efforts have been put forward in fighting stigma and ending discrimination against disadvantaged people, stigma has not been overcome yet. There is the need to develop new effective, multimodal, integrated strategies in order to challenging effectively stigma. In this symposium, national experiences from different European countries will be discussed, with a specific focus on the future perspectives of research in the field of stigma and discrimination.
Clinical/Therapeutic
Session Description
Cognitive dysfunctions represent a core feature of schizophrenia, are present at any stage of the disease and also in subjects at high risk for psychosis (UHR), and have a significant impact on subject’s psychosocial functioning. Pharmacological treatment is modestly effective on cognitive dimension while there is considerable evidence of the efficacy of cognitive remediation interventions on cognition and functioning of patients with schizophrenia. The Symposium has the aim of updating knowledge about the effectiveness and applicability of cognitive remediation techniques in schizophrenia, with a focus also on new developments and technologies. In particular: - will be presented a systematic review on the factors and ingredients influencing response to cognitive remediation in schizophrenia; will be discussed the applicability of cognitive remediation programs in UHR subjects and their effectiveness in preventing transition to psychosis; - will be discussed the biological signatures and effects of cognitive remediation, as revealed especially by neuroimaging techniques; - finally, a specific lecture will address the present and future developments of cognitive remediation for psychoses, focusing also on programs using new technologies, and discussing promises and limitations of the new approaches in the digital era.
Clinical/Therapeutic
Session Description
Proposed by the EPA section on Old Age Psychiatry - The COVID 19 pandemic quickly showed that the older population is a risk group with particular vulnerability. This was particularly true for patients with dementia. They had difficulty understanding the situation, observing distance rules and using masks appropriately. The situation is particularly difficult in nursing homes. In many countries the visit of relatives and also doctors in nursing homes has been banned. Nevertheless, the proportion of people who died in these institutions was high in all countries, for example in Germany up to one third of deaths. What consequences this has and has had for nursing homes, relatives, dementia patients and the people caring for them is to be discussed in greater depth in this symposium, with particular attention being paid to ethical aspects. It will also be discussed which preventive measures can be derived for the future.
Educational
Session Description
Major depression is a serious, disabling, often chronic or recurrent mental disorder affecting over 350 million people worldwide. Treatment of major depression is now conceptualized as proceeding through three phases: the acute phase, the continuation phase, and the remission phase. Patients not achieving remission after several treatment trials are defined treatment-resistant, but a debate is ongoing regarding how many trials must fail before a patient can be defined as “treatment-resistant”. A new concept of “difficult to treat depression” has been recently proposed, based on the model of other medical disciplines. According to this concept, when a complete control of the disorder is not feasible, the treatment should aim at minimizing the impact of symptoms and the side effects of treatments on patients’ daily lives. Moreover, the concept of difficult to treat depression includes the presence of co-occurring problems/behaviours/disorders/situations, which can worsen the course or management of depression. The management of difficult to treat depression include the optimization of disease management, in terms of symptom control, improvement of daily functioning and of quality of life, rather than aiming to achieve sustained remission. In this symposium, the model of difficult to treat depression will be described and the possible therapeutic implications for clinical practice will be discussed. The dimensional treatment model of depression will be introduced and atypical presentations of major depression will be highlighted in order to increase clinicians’ opportunities to manage major depression.
Clinical/Therapeutic
Session Description
Proposed by the EPA section on Neuroimaging and Epidemiology and Social Psychiatry - Refining our understanding of developmental trajectories of mental disorders will allow us to identify early those patients most likely to develop persistence impairment in mental health as well as those patients which will benefit most from treatment. Because of the limited viability of treating all cases, it is particularly important to find out individual determinants predisposing to worst outcome or to a better response to treatment. The key role of social and environmental risk factors, within a gene-environment interplay framework, in precipitating and maintaining specific trajectories in mental disorders will be pointed out in different representative samples. In the same way, alterations in neurobiology and neuroimaging biomarkers which have been associated to developmental patterns leading to different mental health outcome will be critically revised in the light of recent evidence-based results.
Educational
Session Description
Proposed by the EPA section on Tele Mental Health and ECPC Section - The 21st century has witnessed a fast-paced revolution in information technologies, that in turn contributed to the spread of new complementary diagnostic and clinical tools for mental health, which are likely to become a standard of practice in the near future, especially for younger generations of psychiatrists. The symposium will provide an introduction on the main past and contemporary issues related to the diagnostic process in psychiatry and innovative digital approaches to psychiatric diagnosis will be presented. In detail, Neuroanalysis represents a novel integrative approach, based on a patient-interactive digital platform which couples EEG-based imaging data with machine-learning algorithms to measure brain network activity in psychiatric diseases. Digital Phenotyping takes advantage on biosensors and allows to analyze several digital parameters (individual level of activity, GPS location, use of voice/speech, use of social media and human-computer interactions) in real time. Its clinical potential in relation to monitoring the transition from at-risk conditions to initial stages of mental illnesses, in providing accounts of early signs of relapse, and in promoting recovery will be addressed. Finally, the use of automated technologies to perform innovative clinical assessments will be reviewed, with specific reference to the identification of subjects at high risk for neurodevelopmental disorders. Digital tools today represent potentially cost- and time-effective tools for clinical providers to help support early detection and diagnosis of psychiatric disorders and their potentials as well as their caveats for clinical practice will be thoroughly discussed.
Clinical/Therapeutic
Session Description
Proposed by the EPA section on Schizophrenia and Prevention of Mental Disorders - Psychotic disorders and particularly schizophrenia are severe mental illnesses which typically emerge during adolescence and young adulthood. This symposium will address two important components of early intervention aiming at improving functional outcomes in schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders, namely timely assessment and treatment. Briefly, Prof. Mucci (Italy) will discuss functional impairment in recent-onset schizophrenia spectrum disorders, Prof. Glenthøj (Denmark) will focus on early assessment of negative symptoms and related treatment strategies. Then Prof. Thorup (Denmark) will illuminate the often neglected aspect of Family high risk populations and their value for the purpose of early intervention. Finally, Prof. Rancans (Latvia) will present a critical overview of the treatment of schizophrenia from a real world perspective.
Research
Session Description
This symposium will discuss a) novel mechanisms of CNS and peripheral metabolic function (insulin resistance, the mitochondrial pathway of epigenetic regulation of neuroplasticity, neuropeptides) in cross-species models; b) the crosstalk between glial cells and neurons in the regulation of neuroplasticity and c) the need for integrated system-level strategies to identify and more effectively treat biologically based subtypes of depressive disorders and block the progression to dementia. New data of brain-enriched exosomes will also be presented as a new frontier to study in-vivo CNS molecular mechanisms in humans. Pierre Magistretti will present new data on the role of neuron-glia metabolic coupling in neuronal plasticity and neuropsychiatric disorders pointing to a novel action of L-lactate as a signaling molecule in addition to its role as an energy substrate. Carla Nasca (presenter) will present new data on the role of exosomes in psychiatric disorders and the emerging role of mitochondria as regulators of epigenetic programming of neuroplasticity in depressive disorders and rodent models. Aleksander Mathe will discuss the impact of targeting neuropeptide Y pathways in depressive disorders and post-traumatic stress disorder and present both preclinical and clinical data. Natalie Rasgon (chair and presenter) will describe conceptual model of the panel as a unique translational platform for studies of metabolic phenotypes in the progression from depressive disorders to dementia.