Pratik Choudhary, United Kingdom

King's College London Diabetes
I am a clinical academic working at King's College London with a particular interest in hypoglycaemia. I am clinical lead for type 1 diabetes as well as islet and pancreas transplantation, and have done a number of studies with new technologies, particularly around using them to reduce hypoglycaemia.

Moderator Of 1 Session

PARALLEL SESSION Webcast
Session Type
PARALLEL SESSION
Channel
Paris
Date
21.02.2020, Friday
Session Time
09:00 - 10:00

Presenter Of 4 Presentations

Debate: Tubeless or Tubed: The Type of Pump Matters.

Session Type
INDUSTRY SESSION
Date
20.02.2020, Thursday
Session Time
15:00 - 16:30
Channel
Auditorium A
Lecture Time
15:40 - 16:10

NASAL GLUCAGON SUCCESSFULLY REVERSED INSULIN-INDUCED HYPOGLYCEMIA IN ADULTS WITH DIABETES WITH NADIR BLOOD GLUCOSE LESS THAN 3.0 MMOL/L (54 MG/DL): A POOLED ANALYSIS

Abstract

Background and Aims

Nasal glucagon (NG), a ready-to-use drug-device combination for treatment of severe hypoglycemia (SH), contains 3 mg glucagon dry powder that is absorbed through the nasal mucosa. We aimed to examine the efficacy and safety of NG in reversing clinically significant insulin-induced hypoglycemia in adults with diabetes.

Methods

Post-hoc analyses were performed to assess the efficacy and safety of NG compared to injectable glucagon (IG) using data from participants in 3 randomized studies whose nadir blood glucose (BG) was <3.0 mmol/L (54 mg/dL). The analysis included 169 adults (NG=156, IG=133). Treatment success was defined as an increase in BG to ≥3.9 mmol/L (70 mg/dL) or an increase of ≥1.1 mmol/L (20 mg/dL) from nadir BG within 30 min of receiving glucagon. Tolerability was assessed through reported treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) and solicited using a Nasal and Non-Nasal Score Questionnaire.

Results

NG (99.4%) and IG (100%) successfully reversed clinically significant hypoglycemia, and the mean time to treatment success (preparation time excluded) was 14 min and 12 min, respectively (p<0.001). BG changes were similar between treatments (Figure). No serious AEs occurred. TEAEs with an incidence ≥10% for NG were nausea, vomiting, and headache. Worsening of nasal and non-nasal symptoms experienced by ≥10% of patients up to 60 min after NG included runny nose, nasal congestion, nasal itching, watery eyes, redness of eyes, and itchy eyes.

attd ng.png

Conclusions

NG was efficacious and well tolerated in reversing clinically significant hypoglycemia in adults with diabetes, supporting NG as a rescue treatment for SH.

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A NEED FOR REAL CHANGE: UNMET NEEDS IN CARE AND THERAPEUTIC SOLUTIONS

Session Type
INDUSTRY SESSION
Date
21.02.2020, Friday
Session Time
15:00 - 16:30
Channel
Auditorium A
Lecture Time
15:05 - 15:25

Using neuroimaging to understand mechanisms of hypoglycaemia unawareness

Session Type
PARALLEL SESSION
Date
22.02.2020, Saturday
Session Time
10:30 - 12:00
Channel
Madrid
Lecture Time
10:30 - 10:50