Browsing Over 850 Presentations

Program Chair’s Summary and Vision Statement .The Foundational Role of Sensor-Based Glucose Monitoring Technology—How Should Clinicians and Patients Collaborate and Use Sensor-Based Technology to Improve Diabetes Care?

Session Type
INDUSTRY SESSION
Date
19.02.2020, Wednesday
Session Time
14:30 - 16:00
Channel
Rome
Lecture Time
15:50 - 15:55

Interactive Q&A Session

Session Type
INDUSTRY SESSION
Date
19.02.2020, Wednesday
Session Time
14:30 - 16:00
Channel
Rome
Lecture Time
15:55 - 16:00

From MDI to the MiniMed™ 670G system: a 10-day Initiation Protocol

Session Name
Session Type
INDUSTRY SESSION
Date
19.02.2020, Wednesday
Session Time
16:15 - 17:45
Channel
Paris
Lecture Time
16:15 - 16:15

WORKSHOP IS ORGANIZED AND SUPPORTED BY Medtronic

Session Name
Session Type
INDUSTRY SESSION
Date
19.02.2020, Wednesday
Session Time
16:15 - 17:45
Channel
Paris
Lecture Time
16:15 - 16:15

The MiniMed™ 670G System

Session Name
Session Type
INDUSTRY SESSION
Date
19.02.2020, Wednesday
Session Time
16:15 - 17:45
Channel
Paris
Lecture Time
16:15 - 16:30

From MDI to the MiniMed™ 670G System: The Clinical Evidence

Session Name
Session Type
INDUSTRY SESSION
Date
19.02.2020, Wednesday
Session Time
16:15 - 17:45
Channel
Paris
Lecture Time
16:30 - 16:45

From MDI to the MiniMed™ 670G System: The Practice

Session Name
Session Type
INDUSTRY SESSION
Date
19.02.2020, Wednesday
Session Time
16:15 - 17:45
Channel
Paris
Lecture Time
16:45 - 17:45

Opening remarks

Session Name
Session Type
NETWORKING EVENT
Date
19.02.2020, Wednesday
Session Time
18:00 - 19:00
Channel
Auditorium A
Lecture Time
18:00 - 18:10

The evolution of diabetes technology

Session Name
Session Type
NETWORKING EVENT
Date
19.02.2020, Wednesday
Session Time
18:00 - 19:00
Channel
Auditorium A
Lecture Time
18:10 - 18:30

The brain as a target of diabetes complications in children

Session Type
PLENARY SESSION
Date
20.02.2020, Thursday
Session Time
08:30 - 09:30
Channel
Auditorium A
Lecture Time
08:30 - 09:00

Abstract

Background and Aims / Part 1

Severe hypoglycemia may affect the developing brain, yet exposure to chronic hyperglycemia may also adversely impact brain development, particularly in children with early-onset T1D. In the Diabetes Research in Children Network, we are studying cognitive and neurodevelopmental consequences of T1D in a cohort of 144 children (initially 4-9 years old), and 70 age-matched non-diabetic controls.

Methods / Part 2

We performed unsedated structural MRI, using contemporary software, and age-appropriate cognitive testing. Lifetime A1c and glucose sensor data were also assessed.

Results / Part 3

We observed significant differences in total brain, gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) volumes, and altered WM microstructure in T1D compared to controls, and slower brain growth after longitudinal, 18-months follow-up. These differences were highly correlated with metrics of hyperglycemia. Subsequent longitudinal follow-up through puberty shows that children with T1D had slower growth of total cortical and subcortical GM and WM than controls at all time-points; also lower verbal IQ and working memory scores, differences again associated with higher lifetime A1c. Using functional MRI, brain activation patterns showed increased recruitment of executive control areas in T1D, which possibly act to offset diabetes-related impairments in the default mode network (the brain’s “idle “system). We posit these findings may be compensatory mechanisms to facilitate cognitive and behavioral performance.

Conclusions / Part 4

In conclusion, these and other studies demonstrate that hyperglycemia is detrimental to the developing brain during the critical period of rapid brain maturation in children. The impact of improved glycemic control on the brain using artificial pancreas technologies, e.g., is being actively investigated and requires long-term study.

Hide

Epidemiologic evidence linking diabetes to cognitive decline and dementia

Session Type
PLENARY SESSION
Date
20.02.2020, Thursday
Session Time
08:30 - 09:30
Channel
Auditorium A
Lecture Time
09:00 - 09:30

Abstract

Background and Aims / Part 1

There is growing evidence linking hyperglycemia and diabetes to cognitive decline and dementia risk. Because cognitive decline is a precursor to dementia, identifying risk factors for cognitive decline can suggest avenues for prevention and individuals to target for early intervention. Our results from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study suggest that prevention of diabetes and maintaining glucose control in midlife may slow or prevent late-life cognitive decline. Cognitive impairment can pose challenges for diabetes management, leading to a cycle of harm whereby diabetes contributes to cognitive dysfunction and cognitive dysfunction leads to poorly controlled diabetes. There is epidemiologic evidence that episodes of sustained hypoglycemia may also contribute to cognitive impairment and dementia, although mechanisms are uncertain. The current evidence suggests a strong link between diabetes and cognitive outcomes. In older adults with diabetes, assessment of cognitive impairment is important, especially in the setting of a history of hypoglycemia.
Hide

HYBRID CLOSED-LOOP SYSTEM IMPROVES GLUCOSE CONTROL IN PATIENTS TREATED WITH MULTIPLE DAILY INJECTION AND CGM OR INTEGRATED INSULIN PUMP AND CGM OR SENSOR-AUGMENTED PUMP

Session Name
CLOSED-LOOP SYSTEM AND ALGORITHM
Session Type
E-POSTER VIEWING (EXHIBITION HOURS)
Date
20.02.2020, Thursday
Session Time
09:30 - 15:30
Channel
E-Poster Area
Lecture Time
09:30 - 09:31

Abstract

Background and Aims

The MiniMed 670G Hybrid Closed-Loop (HCL) System improves glucose control and reduces glucose variability. There are no data whether HCL Systems achieve different results in T1DM patients treated with multiple daily injection and continuous glucose monitoring (MDI+CGM) or integrated insulin pump and CGM (CSII+CGM) or sensor-augmented pump therapy with predictive low glucose suspend (PLSG) feature. Aim of our study was to evaluate the effect on metabolic control of the switch from MDI+CGM, CSII+CGM or SAP with PLGS in type 1 diabetic patients.

Methods

Baseline clinical characteristics were presented as means and SD. One-way repeated measures ANOVA test was used to verify changes at 12 weeks from baseline in mean blood glucose, SD, TIR, TAR, TBR, Total Insulin dose and % of Basal Insulin.

Results

32 adults with type 1 diabetes (mean age 41,9 + 9,7; duration of diabetes 22 + 12,5; BMI 24,7 + 4,1), who had been using MDI + CGM (n=12) or CSII + CGM (n=11) or SAP therapy (n=9) were evaluated after switching to the 670G System. After 12 weeks a reduction of HbA1c (-0,39% p <0.001), mean glucose and SD (-9,7 mg/dl and 5,8 mg/dl p 0,003 and < 0,001) were observed. TIR increased significantly (+9,7% p < 0,001), in parallel with a reduction in TAR (-8,6% p 0,003) and TBR (-0,87% p 0,044).

Conclusions

Switching to the 670G System significantly improved glucose control in patients previously treated with MDI+CGM and CSII+CGM. Furthermore, similar results were obtained in patients treated with SAP with PLGS feature.

Hide