Go Back

J. Metzger

Author Of 2 Presentations

Roundtable

739 - Is urban sustainability going out of fashion?

Speakers
Authors
Date
Thu, Jul 12, 2018
Time
11:45 - 13:15
Location
241, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden
Session Type
Roundtable

Abstract

Suggested speakers

Barbara Czarniawska, Professor of Management Studies - University of Gothenburg

Jenny Lindblad, PhD candidate - KTH Royal Institute of Technology

Jonas Bylund, Manager - JPI Urban Europe

Mike Raco, Professor and Chair of Urban Governance and Development - Bartlett School of Planning/UCL

Phil Allmendinger, Professor of Land Economy - University of Cambridge

Simon Joss, Professor of Politics and International Relations - University of Westminster

Yvonne Rydin, Professor and Chair of Planning, Environment and Public Policy - Bartlett School of Planning/UCL

Abstract Body

Recent years has seen a proliferation of newfangled concepts which in one way or another purport to relate to ‘sustainable urban development’. These include, but are not limited to, resilient cities, green cities, low-carbon cities and smart cities. A bibliometric analysis of various concepts occurring in the academic literature concerning urban development, performed by De Jong and colleagues, evinced that in 2013 the usage of the term ‘smart cities’ surpassed the previously dominant ‘sustainable cities’ (De Jong et al, 2015).

Within academia, voices are also being raised suggesting that the concrete effects and achievements of planning for sustainable development now need to be critically questioned (see e.g. Raco & Flint, 2012; Hodson & Marvin, 2014) – while there are even those who proclaim that the idea of the sustainable city is effectively “dead” (Whitehead, 2012).

Are these signs of a sea change in the focus of urban development practice, in which the concept of sustainability and associated practices and priorities are ‘going out of fashion’ (see e.g. Czarniawska, 2004), while being replaced by a new repertoire of key concepts and, potentially, new related sets of practices?

Further, if the concept of sustainability is on the way out, is this something to be celebrated as the demise of a red herring, “empty signifier” (Brown, 2016) that has merely served to paper over and legitimize fundamental conflicts and injustices, or is it a concept that has provided – and still can deliver –important leverage for reform work, and therefore should be “revived” (Whitehead, 2012)?

This roundtable will provide an assessment of emerging trends and concepts relating to sustainable urban development, focusing on questions such as:

Has ‘sustainability’ been a fashionable concept that is now losing its attraction and receding to the background of urban planning and development practice? If so, what are its remaining effects or institutional legacy?

How should we view the practices that are coalescing around new key concepts such as smart, resilient, low-carbon – are they continuations of the sustainability paradigm, complimentary or rather competing?

Should ‘sustainability’ be let go off as a guiding concept for urban planning and development? What are the arguments for and against?

REFERENCES

Brown, T. (2016). Sustainability as empty signifier: Its rise, fall, and radical potential. Antipode, 48(1), 115-133.

Czarniawska, B. (2004). Gabriel Tarde and big city management. Distinktion: Scandinavian Journal of Social Theory, 5(2), 119-133.

De Jong, M., Joss, S., Schraven, D., Zhan, C., & Weijnen, M. (2015). Sustainable–smart–resilient–low carbon–eco–knowledge cities; making sense of a multitude of concepts promoting sustainable urbanization. Journal of Cleaner production, 109, 25-38.

Flint, J. & Raco, M. (eds.) (2012). The future of sustainable cities: critical reflections. Bristol: Policy Press.

Hodson, M. & Marvin, S. (eds.) (2014). After sustainable cities. Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge.

Whitehead, M. (2012). “The sustainable city: an obituary? On the future form and prospects of sustainable urbanism”. In Hodson, M. & Marvin, S. (eds.), After sustainable cities. Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 29-46.

Collapse
TRACK 13 ECOLOGIES

673 - The use of sustainability-related concepts in the recent European planning practice: preliminary results part of an international survey

Date
Wed, Jul 11, 2018
Time
11:45 - 13:15
Location
220, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden
Session Type
TRACK 13 ECOLOGIES

Abstract

Abstract Body

The vocabulary of sustainable urban development has in recent years developed into various directions. Agendas concerning the planning of ‘Smart’, ‘sustainable’, ‘attractive’, ‘eco’, and ‘low-carbon’ cities, to give but a few examples, constitute new knowledge and practice paradigms that circulate amongst actors involved in various types of urban planning activities.

The introduction of this range of concepts that purport to guide contemporary sustainable urban development work raises questions about their uptake in different national and professional contexts. How do planners in different countries and areas of expertise relate to this plethora of new concepts that vie for their attention – and what difference does this make?

This paper presents results of a survey conducted with over 500 planning practitioners across Europe. A statistical analysis is conducted, investigating variegations in the uptake of various vocabularies of sustainable urban development between different national contexts and professional subcategories of planning.

The results are discussed in the light of current scholarly debates concerning the similarities and differences between different conceptual repertoires of sustainable urban development, as well as how (or even, if) they serve to direct attention and effort towards sustainability issues in planning.

Collapse

Presenter Of 1 Presentation

Roundtable

739 - Is urban sustainability going out of fashion?

Speakers
Authors
Date
Thu, Jul 12, 2018
Time
11:45 - 13:15
Location
241, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden
Session Type
Roundtable

Abstract

Suggested speakers

Barbara Czarniawska, Professor of Management Studies - University of Gothenburg

Jenny Lindblad, PhD candidate - KTH Royal Institute of Technology

Jonas Bylund, Manager - JPI Urban Europe

Mike Raco, Professor and Chair of Urban Governance and Development - Bartlett School of Planning/UCL

Phil Allmendinger, Professor of Land Economy - University of Cambridge

Simon Joss, Professor of Politics and International Relations - University of Westminster

Yvonne Rydin, Professor and Chair of Planning, Environment and Public Policy - Bartlett School of Planning/UCL

Abstract Body

Recent years has seen a proliferation of newfangled concepts which in one way or another purport to relate to ‘sustainable urban development’. These include, but are not limited to, resilient cities, green cities, low-carbon cities and smart cities. A bibliometric analysis of various concepts occurring in the academic literature concerning urban development, performed by De Jong and colleagues, evinced that in 2013 the usage of the term ‘smart cities’ surpassed the previously dominant ‘sustainable cities’ (De Jong et al, 2015).

Within academia, voices are also being raised suggesting that the concrete effects and achievements of planning for sustainable development now need to be critically questioned (see e.g. Raco & Flint, 2012; Hodson & Marvin, 2014) – while there are even those who proclaim that the idea of the sustainable city is effectively “dead” (Whitehead, 2012).

Are these signs of a sea change in the focus of urban development practice, in which the concept of sustainability and associated practices and priorities are ‘going out of fashion’ (see e.g. Czarniawska, 2004), while being replaced by a new repertoire of key concepts and, potentially, new related sets of practices?

Further, if the concept of sustainability is on the way out, is this something to be celebrated as the demise of a red herring, “empty signifier” (Brown, 2016) that has merely served to paper over and legitimize fundamental conflicts and injustices, or is it a concept that has provided – and still can deliver –important leverage for reform work, and therefore should be “revived” (Whitehead, 2012)?

This roundtable will provide an assessment of emerging trends and concepts relating to sustainable urban development, focusing on questions such as:

Has ‘sustainability’ been a fashionable concept that is now losing its attraction and receding to the background of urban planning and development practice? If so, what are its remaining effects or institutional legacy?

How should we view the practices that are coalescing around new key concepts such as smart, resilient, low-carbon – are they continuations of the sustainability paradigm, complimentary or rather competing?

Should ‘sustainability’ be let go off as a guiding concept for urban planning and development? What are the arguments for and against?

REFERENCES

Brown, T. (2016). Sustainability as empty signifier: Its rise, fall, and radical potential. Antipode, 48(1), 115-133.

Czarniawska, B. (2004). Gabriel Tarde and big city management. Distinktion: Scandinavian Journal of Social Theory, 5(2), 119-133.

De Jong, M., Joss, S., Schraven, D., Zhan, C., & Weijnen, M. (2015). Sustainable–smart–resilient–low carbon–eco–knowledge cities; making sense of a multitude of concepts promoting sustainable urbanization. Journal of Cleaner production, 109, 25-38.

Flint, J. & Raco, M. (eds.) (2012). The future of sustainable cities: critical reflections. Bristol: Policy Press.

Hodson, M. & Marvin, S. (eds.) (2014). After sustainable cities. Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge.

Whitehead, M. (2012). “The sustainable city: an obituary? On the future form and prospects of sustainable urbanism”. In Hodson, M. & Marvin, S. (eds.), After sustainable cities. Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 29-46.

Collapse

Moderator Of 1 Session

Roundtable Ecologies RT
Date
Thu, Jul 12, 2018
Time
11:45 - 13:15
Session chair
Room
241